Author Topic: PTSD, Now What?  (Read 2076 times)

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Offline notnewhere

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PTSD, Now What?
« on: October 25, 2016, 21:03:18 »
Hello everyone,

So, I have recently been diagnosed by a psychiatrist with PTSD. I am still in the forces.

Is there anything I should be doing right now?

Thank you for your help.

Offline 3VPspecialty

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Re: PTSD, Now What?
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2016, 22:01:35 »
Print off disability award forms from VAC and send them in to the nearest office. Also get a My VAC account set up, it helps a lot.

And whatever your psych and VAC decide on your disability is between you and them and doesn't have to include your CoC

Best of luck, remember it's a low and slow approach to dealing with VAC.

Online gryphonv

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Re: PTSD, Now What?
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2016, 22:40:51 »
To add to 3VPspecialty,

Take it slow, keep your medical chain employed, but don't let things overwhelm you.

If the psychiatrist is employed directly with the CF things will go a lot smoother, if they are outsourced, be sure to get Release of Information Forms for them and your Dr, that way they can communicate without having to go through you. These forms can be revoked at anytime.

Also if you can employ your local VAC office, you are entitled to a case manager. They can help you navigate the maze that is VAC.

One thing to not forget though, help is always easy to find. Be it here, through VAC, or your medical staff. Don't ever think you are stuck  dealing with things on your own.

Offline notnewhere

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Re: PTSD, Now What?
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2016, 22:10:53 »
Thank you for the help/info everyone. Have a follow-up shortly to discuss a treatment plan.

Offline Brihard

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Re: PTSD, Now What?
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2016, 00:11:49 »
Others hve already made reference to the need to put a claim in through Veterans Affairs. This is definitely something to get done with as soon as you can turn yor attention to it. Normally for PTSD youll see an initial disability rating of 10% followed by a reevaluation farther down the road when treatment has had some time.

Putting a claim in can be a lengthy and tough process due to how specific a lot of the information has to be. Its somethign you want to get help with. I cannot recommend strongly enough that you enlist the help of a Service Officer from the Royal Canadian Legion. The service officers are full time paid staff whose job is to help vets with exactly this kind of thing. You dont have to be a Legion member, you dont have to like the Legion or have had any involvement with them. The service officers exist to help YOU. They are quite experienced with both initial claims and with appeals should that become necessary. I suggest checking the site I've linked below, and call up whoever is closest to you. VAC can be demanding, and the process of putting a claim through can be stressful and triggering for your condition. A service officer will help.

http://www.legion.ca/we-can-help/contact-a-service-officer/

Best of luck. By getting the diagnosis youve taken the first and toughest step. From here, a lot of people wil be there to help you, and I suggest you let them do so.

Pacificsm is doctrine fostered by a delusional minority and by the media, which holds forth the proposition it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

Offline Staff Weenie

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Re: PTSD, Now What?
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2016, 10:35:01 »
I've already commented on what you need to note on VAC claims on other threads. At the moment, the focus is on you. I guess I would give a few pieces of advice, based upon my own life with PTSD since 2010, and the observations I've made working with the IPSC and JPSU for years now.

Own your recovery - Don't be passive and assume that going to the Psychiatrist, or Social Worker alone will make things better. They're just giving you the tools to help. The meds help level and stabilize you, so that you can begin your recovery. You're in the driver's seat so practice the things they tell you, the breathing exercises, the mindfulness activities. If you do Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, some of it will open up nasty memories, but you need to be strong, confront the memories, and put them into their rightful place. Work at it, and expect that at first it will suck badly. If you stay with it, you will see progress.

Avoid Self Medicating - Alcohol and illegal drugs are not your friends. They may help numb you, or ease the anxiety for a few hours, maybe knock you out for a few hours, but what they give you in return is far worse than you can imagine. Too many of us have chosen that route, and too frequently it ends terribly.

Contact OSISS - The peer-based Operational Stress Injury Social Support network has been a huge benefit in my life. My wife and kids don't get it, my friends don't get it, but my OSISS peers do. For a couple of hours a every other week, I can be with people who understand and support. They can be found at OSISS.ca online. Or, contact your nearest Integrated Personnel Support Centre (IPSC). If you don't know where that is, send me a PM, and I'll get you in touch with them. Remember, OSISS also has groups to support your family, to help them as well!

Reach out - Don't isolate, don't hide from it, don't be ashamed of it. There is support out there. But, if you alienate too many people, you will find out how lonely it can be.

Get active - physical activity is a very significant benefit - and that's clinically proven. Contact Soldier On and get onto an activity with them. Try yoga - they've recently shown hard data on how much it helps people with PTSD. Don't sit idle, it lets the intrusive thoughts come in.

Don't become a professional victim - I see far too much of this on social media, and with some folks I've dealt with through work. People imploding on Facebook, blaming everybody else for what happens, etc.. I've also seen instances where I believe that some folks are subconsciously holding onto their injury, because it's all they know now, it's what defines them as a unique individual. Some few (and I say few) hold onto it because there's a cash payout from VAC. They are legitimately ill, but they don't want to get better, because that will reduce their Disability Award, and other payouts from SISIP and VAC. Even at 100% from VAC, is it really worth it, when you consider how many more decades you've got to live? Your recovery should be far more important!

Anyway, enough pontificating from me - good luck, and never give up. If you need to chat, send me a PM.