Author Topic: Thank you for your military service — now here are 9 reasons why I won't hire yo  (Read 2918 times)

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Thank you for your military service — now here are 9 reasons why I won't hire you

So, you’ve decided to hang up the uniform after years of distinguished service to our great nation. You’ve attended a few transition classes and have your interview suit and shiny new resume as you make the leap into the civilian world.

You feel confident, because you’ve seen your colleagues leave the uniform on Friday and come to work the following Monday in a suit and tie making twice as much salary. You storm the job boards and job fairs. Never mind that although you’ve drafted a plan of action and milestones (POA&M) for every significant evolution of your military career, some of you have invested the least amount of time and effort into your own transition POA&M.

http://www.businessinsider.com/hiring-veterans-tips-2014-1
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline MedCorps

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My wife does a reasonable amount of hiring in the public service. Quite often when she has a military applicant she needs to bring home the resume to get me to decode it for her.

It is remarkable how poorly people applying are able to convert army speak to civilian speak on the resume. "DP 3 qualified - top candidate - Gagetown 2014" means very little to someone on civi street, as does "qualified TACLANE operation and repair".

Most people doing hiring do not have a military husband / wife at home who can decode your resume and they get binned as confusing.

Food for thought.

MC

Offline ModlrMike

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My wife does a reasonable amount of hiring in the public service. Quite often when she has a military applicant she needs to bring home the resume to get me to decode it for her.

It is remarkable how poorly people applying are able to convert army speak to civilian speak on the resume. "DP 3 qualified - top candidate - Gagetown 2014" means very little to someone on civi street, as does "qualified TACLANE operation and repair".

Most people doing hiring do not have a military husband / wife at home who can decode your resume and they get binned as confusing.

Food for thought.

MC

I've always felt that this should be what is presented at SCAN. Unfortunately, these days in some places if you're not being released 3B, you don't get to attend. Retirement and transition planning should start in basic, but could also be part of the process of converting from a BE to an IE.
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Offline SupersonicMax

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I find military personnel in general are bad at vulgarizing, or explaining in terms people can understand, what they do.  It's obviously true for military-civilian interractions but also within the military where some words or accronyms may mean something different to me than to you.  In correspondance (written or verbal), define job-specific or accronyms the first time they are used.

Offline Hamish Seggie

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I find military personnel in general are bad at vulgarizing, or explaining in terms people can understand, what they do.  It's obviously true for military-civilian interractions but also within the military where some words or accronyms may mean something different to me than to you.  In correspondance (written or verbal), define job-specific or accronyms the first time they are used.

You're right. Also convert those military things - like leadership or management courses - into HR speak. Company Transport Sergeant means nothing to an HR person. A manager of a fleet of 200 + vehicles in which you were responsible to schedule maintenance, supervise maintenance, order supplies (POL) etc means something to a civvy.
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Online mariomike

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Re: Thank you for your military service — now here are 9 reasons
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2017, 20:56:26 »
So, you’ve decided to hang up the uniform after years of distinguished service to our great nation.

This sounds like a Voluntary Release ( VR ).

If the individual has stayed in the CAF for the whole ride, they should be receiving a 70% pension.

70 per cent is considered the benchmark for adequate financial provisions in retirement for Canadian workers. Retire the day you max-out. ( 70% ).

By then, your mortgage is likely paid off, the kids have left home, your spouse is contributing income. Investments and savings etc...

I understand that everyone's financial situation is different. But, I find that my 70% pension is more than enough to live comfortably.

Without the need to start a new career with a new employer.



« Last Edit: February 26, 2017, 21:03:54 by mariomike »
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Offline Hamish Seggie

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I understand that, but some of the people need to get out of the house and a second career/job is what they need. I don't know how many people I've seen retire at age 55 and within 3-4 years they're dead.

Not this kid.....I'm living for a while yet.
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

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Offline Underway

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Offline jollyjacktar

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I understand that, but some of the people need to get out of the house and a second career/job is what they need. I don't know how many people I've seen retire at age 55 and within 3-4 years they're dead.

Not this kid.....I'm living for a while yet.

That's cuz legends find it hard to die.   ;)

Offline Hamish Seggie

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That's cuz legends find it hard to die.   ;)

You know it bro!! LOL ;)

Actually one of the COs of 2VP called me a "legend". I was quite taken aback.
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

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Offline Eagle Eye View

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If you do a simple google search "how to convert military career on resume" you'll find good sites that takes your military terms and transfer them into civilian terms, free of charge. That's what I did for my resume a few years ago.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2017, 07:04:21 by Eagle Eye View »
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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Thank you for your military service - 9 reasons why I won't hire you
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2017, 23:08:33 »
My wife does a reasonable amount of hiring in the public service. Quite often when she has a military applicant she needs to bring home the resume to get me to decode it for her.

It is remarkable how poorly people applying are able to convert army speak to civilian speak on the resume. "DP 3 qualified - top candidate - Gagetown 2014" means very little to someone on civi street, as does "qualified TACLANE operation and repair".

Most people doing hiring do not have a military husband / wife at home who can decode your resume and they get binned as confusing.

Food for thought.

MC

I recently helped one of our troops do the same thing. He's a well qualified military driver and logistician, but got no bites on his resume because no one knows what a 'MSEOP' is..

I told him to write: "Since 1997 safely and without incident drove heavy duty vehicles, and conveyed more than 2000 passengers, over 20,000 kms both on and off paved roads in 15 different countries."

He got a call and picked up a driving job the next week.
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Not a Sig Op

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A-CR-007-000/AG-001 is (or at least was) the canadian published translating military skills to a civilian resume.

I've got a copy around somewhere if anyone wants it.

Just a note, even if it's "translated", don't put every course you've ever done on the resume, only the ones relevant to the job you're applying for.

If it's more than one page, it's too long.

Most employers recognize that military experience and training is "good", but unless you have specialized technical training, and it's either directly relevant to the job, or you've gotten equivalent civilian qualifications with it, most HR people envision everyone as infantry anyway.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2017, 08:05:36 by Not a Sig Op »
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline Underway

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Re: Thank you for your military service - 9 reasons why I won't hire you
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2017, 08:55:41 »
I told him to write: "Since 1997 safely and without incident drove heavy duty vehicles, and conveyed more than 2000 passengers, over 20,000 kms both on and off paved roads in 15 different countries."

This is really important.  Interviewers want numbers and examples.

Also there is another little trick.  Many HR systems use a computer algorithm to sort out what resume's to look at.  Resume hack from learntobecurious.com.

Quote
...snip...

Do you ever read a job description and just know that you would be the perfect fit? You know if you get called in for an interview you will astonish the interviewers and they’ll have no choice but to hire you. All you need to do is get to the interview stage. You spend so much time curating your resume to make it specific for that job, all to have the employer never even contact you.

Most of the time when the employer doesn’t contact you it’s because you have been filtered out of the running based on a couple skills that you are missing, or a couple words that weren’t present on your resume. The first thing we need to do in order to ‘hack’ the automated screener is understand how it works.

Your resume is received and it is entered into a parser. The parsers job is to filter through your resume and ‘look’ for certain strings of characters. The employer then enters certain words that pertain to the job you have applied for. The amount of words that you have matching on your resume, with the words that the employer enters, is how your resume is graded. Then based upon this grade, you may or may not be contacted. So how, you ask, can you get past the parser and come up to the employers view? Easy.

At the bottom of your resume, type out all of the possible buzz words and experience that pertain to the job you are applying for that you can think of (even if you don’t have the experience). Make the font smaller if you have to, I mean literally cram everything in. Once you have everything you can possibly think of the computer parser looking for, highlight your newly added text and change the colour of it to white.

Once you have changed this text to white, the parser can still see it and you will receive one of the highest resume scores. However, the employer cannot see the text so you are not lying about your experience. This will make your resume pop up to the top of the list for the employer, and in turn will guarantee that it will be read by human eyes.This will nine times out of ten get you called in for an interview.

...snip...

*emphasis added

Offline Journeyman

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So, spending a career burning bridges can be listed as an engineering skill, and if people who disagree with one another both concur that I'm a douche, list that as 'team building'?     ;D

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: Thank you for your military service - 9 reasons why I won't hire you
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2017, 11:25:59 »
This is really important.  Interviewers want numbers and examples.

Alternately, use the same terms on your resume that are included in the job ad, that's what they're searching for.
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline NavyShooter

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Re: Thank you for your military service — now here are 9 reasons why
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2017, 12:00:48 »
I think my resume (last time I updated it) was up to about 7 pages long.

Yes, I know, make it one page.

But!

I wrote in everything, and made it 7 pages so that when I decide to apply for something (if I need to) I will simply delete or shorten the sections that don't apply for the job I'm applying for until it goes down to one page.

My master resume will still have 7 + pages, but the one submitted would only be 1.

Target (and translate) the resume to the job you are applying for.

Insert disclaimer statement here....

:panzer:

Offline captloadie

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I found the attached link had a good discussion on "How long should my resume be?"

https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/how-to-decide-on-resume-length

Online mariomike

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Re: Thank you for your military service —
« Reply #18 on: February 27, 2017, 17:53:12 »
I don't know how many people I've seen retire at age 55 and within 3-4 years they're dead.

Retire at 55 and live to 80; work till you’re 65 and die at 67. Startling new data shows how work pounds older bodies.
http://www.biznews.com/thought-leaders/2013/09/10/retire-at-55-and-live-to-80-work-till-youre-65-and-die-at-67-startling-new-data-shows-how-work-pounds-older-bodies/

I retired on my 55th birthday. No way I was staying one day longer and breaking my back for only 30% more than I would get playing golf or bowling as a pensioner.
Your benefits remain unchanged when you retire.

They explain that when you hire on so you can mark it on your calendar.  :)

Now that the accrual rate has been raised from 2% to 2.33%, they can max-out and retire on their 50th birthday.
That's not considered a perk or a luxury, but has long been accepted as being in the best interests of public safety.

He's a well qualified military driver and logistician, but got no bites on his resume because no one knows what a 'MSEOP' is..

I was a PRes MSE Op. CAF experience was desirable back then ( before the two-year diploma program ) as many of the men ( it was a different time ) who did the hiring were what we called '46ers.

I mentioned it during my interview, as I had my eye on the emergency bus and truck division.

HR is much more involved than they were years ago.

So are the colleges with their own set of values.

Colleges also reduce the number of candidates to chose from.

I believe returning to the residency requirement would improve loyalty.

If a former CAF member is applying for a union job, it might be a good idea to obtain a copy of the collective agreement.
If you have never been a member of a union, the part about seniority may be of particular interest.

Also, read the S.O.P.s., if possible.

Applicants may wish to consider this advice,

Tattoos: A Word of Warning
http://firelink.monster.com/benefits/articles/929-tattoos-a-word-of-warning?page=2

Somebody should write a book about the rise and fall of the para-military structure in emergency services.




« Last Edit: February 28, 2017, 16:37:14 by mariomike »
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