Author Topic: Paying Compliments (Saluting, Verbal Address)  (Read 110869 times)

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Offline BernDawg

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Re: protocol
« Reply #50 on: January 30, 2005, 09:27:45 »
AN interesting aside to the Army AF name thing. I re-mustered 5 years ago and found my self as a tradesman on an air base (after 15 yrs as a ground pounder).  When an officer or snr NCO introduces themself as "Bob" or "Larry" the most informal response I can bring myself to use at work is Boss as in "Yes boss" or "Good morning Boss" for snr NCO's. Officers are still Sir or Ma'am.  The whole first name thing just doesn't feel right at work.

I guess you can take the man out of the grunts but you can't take the grunt out of the man.
"We can't all be heroes... because someone has to sit on the curb and clap as they go by."  Will Rogers
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Offline Radop

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Re: protocol
« Reply #51 on: January 30, 2005, 13:47:21 »
I have a good friend who is now a CWO. We have known each other since before we joined the RegF, and I was best man at his wedding. His wife and mine are friends from high school days. When the CWO and I see each other on duty, it is by the rules. When we are at each others' houses or I am out shooting gophers with him, it is as friends. Professionals know where the line is.

Cheers.
I agree fully with you especially with your use of professionals.  The unfortunate thing is that there are a lot of unprofessional soldiers in at the moment.  The worst part is Pte or Cpls calling Snr NCOs by their first name at work because they use it on the ice.  My wife has several friends of high commanders in Kingston and personally I feel uncomfortable calling them anything other than sir.  I call them by their first name at their place or at church, etc but definitely not at work.
Radop
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Offline pbi

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Re: protocol
« Reply #52 on: January 30, 2005, 20:57:20 »
Quote
The unfortunate thing is that there are a lot of unprofessional soldiers in at the moment.  The worst part is Pte or Cpls calling Snr NCOs by their first name at work because they use it on the ice. 

Yes-you are right, but I can assure you it is not just "at the moment"-this has been around for a while in some places. The problem with it in an Army environment is that there is a much higher risk in an Army unit that the superior will have to order the subordinate to do something nasty or dangerous-a "first name" basis can break down the discipline needed to make that work. Of course, as we have discussed at length on other threads, we have a number of people in the Army who never imagine they will have to do anything along those lines. IMHO the superior who alllows and encourages it at the wrong time and place  is just as bad (in fact, worse...) than the subordinate who does it.

Cheers
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Offline InterestedParty

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Re: protocol
« Reply #53 on: January 30, 2005, 21:10:08 »
When we are at each others' houses or I am out shooting gophers with him, it is as friends.

PBI,

Were those gophers armed? Can you verify that with certainty? Did they approach you with hostile intent? Otherwise I would watch what you say in public lest you may end up in the dock at the Hague,   8) cheers, mdh

Offline Meridian

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Re: protocol
« Reply #54 on: January 30, 2005, 21:14:20 »
Also, were those gophers uniformed and seeminly professional? Might cause some issues in the media :)

Offline InterestedParty

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Re: protocol
« Reply #55 on: January 30, 2005, 21:19:15 »
My best advice sir is to insist that you discovered a network of spiderholes/tunnels used cleverly by a fifth column of jihadist gophers working their way toward and under the US border.

Offline George Wallace

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Re: protocol
« Reply #56 on: January 30, 2005, 21:23:31 »
Then they should call in the USAF and carpet bomb....  ;D

GW
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Offline pbi

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Re: protocol
« Reply #57 on: January 30, 2005, 21:35:13 »
I applied "reasonable grounds". And I didn't shoot any of them when they were running away.






OK-well....I did, but......what if they came back? When I wasn't looking?


Cheers
The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools. ...

The true measure of a man is what he would do if he knew he never would be found out...

Offline Sailing Instructor

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Re: protocol
« Reply #58 on: February 01, 2005, 17:27:35 »
It seems my question has been overlooked due to the other posts being of a far more interesting nature.  However, I must ask once again:

When O Canada is played while the flag is hoisted (i.e. the time known as 'colours' in the Navy), shall I sing?  I ask because there is a rule saying 'one does not sing the anthem as part of a salute' & I am slightly confused as to whether saluting as the flag is hoisted counts as a salute.  I expect that it does not count: the rule refers only to the regal/viceregal salutes & the reason for not singing O Canada & God save the Queen is that they cut off: it would sound awful with a fraction of the words sung.

Are my reasoning & conclusion correct?

Offline George Wallace

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Re: protocol
« Reply #59 on: February 01, 2005, 21:50:48 »
Sailing Instructor, no you do not sing during the Royal or Vice-Regal Salute. My background on this is based upon three years as an HADC to LGov of Manitoba. Regarding the Vice-Regal, this is practical as well as customary because near of the two anthems are completely played. On many occasions I have seen the consternation of many civilian dignitaries when "all of sudden the music stops".

Regarding who salutes in the hallway, or whenever a group of officers are moving from one place to another, it should be the senior person return the compliments. This seniority is determined by rank, position, commissioning date.

Sailing Instructor

I guess you must have fallen off the top rack and never read this post from back on 26 January 2005.

GW
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Offline Sailing Instructor

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Re: protocol
« Reply #60 on: February 02, 2005, 19:44:31 »
I did read that, but I was rather hoping for an explicit statement that, yes, you sing O Canada when it is played during colours.  Anyway, thanks for the answer, Her Majesty's forces shall delight in my wonderful rendition of O Canada henceforth.

Big Bad John

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Re: protocol
« Reply #61 on: February 02, 2005, 19:53:31 »
In the Marines, God help you if you don't sing...enthusiastically!!!

Offline J0HN

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Question about going to attention.
« Reply #62 on: June 27, 2005, 13:31:49 »
Do you have to go to attention everytime you talk to a higher superior? Even if your not on duty?

Thanks alot,

John

Offline paracowboy

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #63 on: June 27, 2005, 14:25:32 »
depends on the unit you're in, the superior you're addressing, and how much poop you've gotten in lately.
...time to cull the herd.

Offline Acorn

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #64 on: June 27, 2005, 20:02:03 »
Yes. Unless told otherwise.

Acorn
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Offline Hatchet Man

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #65 on: July 06, 2005, 04:00:23 »
Do you have to go to attention everytime you talk to a higher superior? Even if your not on duty?

Thanks alot,

John

Depends, if you are on course than yes.  If not then no, at least I never have unless entering an office of thiers.  I have saluted officers when I go to speak to them but other than that I was standing relaxed while I spoke with them.

Offline Brad Sallows

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #66 on: July 06, 2005, 17:05:45 »
"Go to attention"...is this a down east thing, like "stay where you're at and I'll come where you're to"?

Here in the west we "come to attention".
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Offline Ex-Dragoon

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #67 on: July 06, 2005, 18:22:17 »
"Go to attention"...is this a down east thing, like "stay where you're at and I'll come where you're to"?

Here in the west we "come to attention".

Its Come to Attention here (as in the east) as well
« Last Edit: July 07, 2005, 13:08:09 by Ex-Dragoon »
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Offline Ditch

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #68 on: July 10, 2005, 02:36:05 »
Semantics aside - the young private asks a good question.

As a member of the Primary Reserve, you are not subject to the CSD when not in uniform or on military property.  Therefore, if you were to encounter a superior while at a movie with friends, it would not be necessary to stomp your feet and adopt the position of attention.  I would not recommend being rude, as your actions will be remembered the next parade night, just be polite and civil.
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Offline FastEddy

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #69 on: July 10, 2005, 03:29:20 »
Do you have to go to attention everytime you talk to a higher superior? Even if your not on duty?

Thanks alot,

John


Just a tip, if its to the RSM, I'd highly reccommend it. ;D
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Offline PikaChe

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #70 on: July 10, 2005, 17:41:36 »


Just a tip, if its to the RSM, I'd highly reccommend it. ;D
Or anyone with a high degree of accuracy with a pace stick. :D

Offline the 48th regulator

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #71 on: July 10, 2005, 19:19:09 »
Quote
Semantics aside - the young private asks a good question.

As a member of the Primary Reserve, you are not subject to the CSD when not in uniform or on military property.   Therefore, if you were to encounter a superior while at a movie with friends, it would not be necessary to stomp your feet and adopt the position of attention.   I would not recommend being rude, as your actions will be remembered the next parade night, just be polite and civil.

This sums it up quite nicely.   Coming to attention when off duty is as bad as giving the high five in the field.   You become a sniper check, or garnish the weird looks of those around you.   Being polite and civil is the way to go, as they Will remember you if you are an ***.

hmm what am I saying?? I should have heeded that advice last night!!...Ah Pacino day soirees..

nuff said

dileas

tess

btw, I too say the going to atteniton, not coming.

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Offline FormerHorseGuard

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #72 on: July 11, 2005, 05:36:21 »
when in doubt stand at attention.  or do it the PTE OPIE way, lean on doorframes in your office as you stand there and talk to the CO, and then have the Padre come and tell you Pte Opie , only  you  would get away  with leaning on the door frame talking to the LCOL  like that  and  only  you  would do it again.

I was the Pte OPIE and leaned on the door frame talking to the LCOL. Nothing happened to me.
But common manner is come to attention when you know the person outranks you . then wait for direction to stand at ease or stand easy or as you were.

Offline OHara(Banned)

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #73 on: July 11, 2005, 08:23:57 »
It really all depends on what it is about. If you are casually discussing something with a officer then there isnt much need to stand at attention. The only Officer that would tell you otherwise would be one who has his head to far up his *** or his/her wife/husband isnt putting out! I have done lots of things with a Brig General (Kilby) When I was the CSM of my Army Cadet Corps (2510 RMRang Sicamous B.C) And he didnt like it when I stood at attention to talk to him. So it all depends on who you are talking too, how you are talking, and if you want to do it for the hell of it out of respect then do it.

Offline reccecrewman

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Re: Question about going to attention.
« Reply #74 on: September 02, 2005, 20:07:41 »
I would definitely agree that it all depends on the situation & the rank of the individual you're speaking to.  Generally speaking, most officers & sergeant majors are fairly relaxed when not on duty (some even when on duty unless you're the object of their anger)  I see my CO & RSM quite frequently when out and about around Petawawa and Pembroke and for them, they don't expect their troops to come to attention when speaking to them.  I will say it's in your very best interests to use "Sir" when addressing them no matter what the situation though.
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