Author Topic: Islamic Terrorism in the West ( Mega thread)  (Read 332950 times)

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Offline George Wallace

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Islamic Terrorism in the West ( Mega thread)
« on: November 13, 2008, 19:52:00 »
Just for those who may feel that all is well and that they have no fear of terrorism or violence here in Canada:  (Link in Title)

Reproduced under the Fair Dealings provisions of the Copyright Act.

Ottawa prof arrested, suspect in 1980 Paris bombing

CTV.ca News Staff

The RCMP has arrested a Canadian man in Quebec at the request of France, which accuses the man of being behind a bomb attack that killed four people at a Paris synagogue in 1980.


The Department of Justice confirmed to CTV.ca that Hassan Diab, 55, was arrested at his home in Gatineau, Quebec Thursday.

"The arrest was made under a provisional arrest warrant for extradition as a request from France," Justice spokesperson Chris Girouard said.

Under a provisional arrest warrant, the official extradition request must be filed within 45 days. Diab will have a bail hearing within 24 hours of his arrest, according to Girouard.

France's Minister of the Interior, Michele Alliot-Marie, confirmed the arrest Thursday and credited cooperation between Canadian and French authorities.

Diab is a part-time sociology professor at the University of Ottawa, CTV News has learned. According to the university officials, he teaches one class at the undergraduate level.

Diab is also listed as a contract instructor in the department of sociology and anthropology at Carleton University for the fall of 2008. Carleton officials could not be reached for comment Thursday evening.

Two French anti-terrorism judges travelled to Canada earlier this week according to The Associated Press. Investigators are searching Diab's home and office for clues, including DNA samples.

A year ago the story broke that Diab was being investigated by French authorities. He told French media it was a case of mistaken identity.

Three French citizens and one Israeli woman were killed outside a synagogue in a posh area of Paris when a bomb went off minutes before a crowd of people were due to emerge from the synagogue. Twenty others were hurt.

The attack took place on a Friday evening, at the start of the Jewish Sabbath. More than 200,000 marched in France to protest the attack.

According to the French magazine L'Express, French authorities believe the bombing was arranged by a Palestinian militant group involved in a dispute with Yasser Arafat's Palestine Liberation Organization.

Diab's name was attached to the group by German intelligence, The Associated Press is reporting.

(News footage on Link.)
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Offline twistedcables

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2008, 17:19:27 »
Notwithstanding the usual (and empty) caveats of a presumption of innocence.  I tend to lean towards the side of the agencies that have the information that the media does not (and should not).

I have to say, very few deeds are as low as wanting to bomb a place of worship. That's when you can use the term EVIL appropriately.  Personally, I want to see more initiative from the mainstream Muslim community.  This is not (at all) to suggest we unfairly target a whole community but unless everyone works together, its true what they say: not a question of IF but WHEN.

Vigilance.

"Lest We Forget" should not become an empty phrase.  VIGILANCE is its core.
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Offline Shec

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2008, 08:33:39 »
I hate to think what this innocent victim of mistaken identity taught the young minds that he was instructing.   A Desert Eagle .50AE is just the ticket for this SoB.
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Offline FastEddy

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2008, 12:13:38 »
I hate to think what this innocent victim of mistaken identity taught the young minds that he was instructing.   A Desert Eagle .50AE is just the ticket for this SoB.


Oh ! that's not the Canadian way, "Nox Vulpes" will be very displeased with you.

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Offline twistedcables

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2008, 11:46:43 »
SOURCE: Terrorism Focus - Volume V, Issue 39 Jamestown Foundation

SPAIN’S GUARDIA CIVIL SEIZES TERRORIST MANUAL ADVOCATING “SECRECY IN JIHAD”

Spain’s Guardia Civil has released details of a terrorist manual discovered in the Catalonian home of Muhammad Mrabet, a Moroccan national accused of organizing an al-Qaeda cell that sent prospective suicide bombers to Iraq. The most notorious product of Mrabet’s network was Belgacem Bellil, an Algerian who detonated a truck carrying 3,500 pounds of explosives at the Italian camp at al-Nasiriyah in 2003, killing 19 Italian soldiers and nine Iraqis.

As detailed by the Spanish daily El Pais, the 30-page Arabic language document was entitled, “Secrecy in Jihad is a Legitimate Duty - Security Manual" (El Pais [Madrid], November 10). As its title suggests, the manual provides a detailed description of the means and methods of covert operations, as sanctioned by selected Islamic scholars. “Secrecy is a key factor in every war. It is a mistake not to use it for jihad, because the infidel leaders recruit thousands of intelligence agents to obtain information about the mujahideen… Many ulama [religious scholars] allowed the use of lies to achieve a religious benefit that may put an end to the punishment inflicted on Muslims by infidels.”

Practical advice is given on methods of disguise, avoiding surveillance, forging passports, encrypting communications, using invisible ink and how to behave during police interrogations. The structure and functioning of a terrorist cell is explained in detail, with the author insisting the cell’s members must agree on “four key issues: obedience, secrecy, patience and the defense of the amirs.”

Intelligence work is also emphasized. The active jihadi should prepare by studying not only the secret services of his host nation, but also other radical Islamist groups operating in the area in order to divert police attention from the cell if necessary. Earlier successful jihadi operations must be examined in detail and meetings with experienced jihadis should be organized. Secrecy is to be upheld at all times:

It is necessary to change the way of dressing, the haircut, the place of residence, car, daily routes, arrival and departure times, places, and meetings…Use nicknames, false names and codes, even within the members of the same group; speak in a low voice, do not say much; to talk far too much may provide some information to the enemy and damage the rest of the mujahideen.

The author of the jihadi security manual remains unknown. In recent years Catalonia has become known as one of Europe’s most important centers for recruiting and training suicide bombers on their way to Iraq (La Vanguardia [Barcelona], June 3, 2007; see also Terrorism Monitor, June 7, 2007).

***Similar documents have been found among groups arrested all over the world: Canada, the UK, Australia and the U.S.  I am unsure if Netherlands and Denmark have also captured these same docs.

VIGILANCE
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Offline leroi

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2008, 10:50:53 »
Follow-Up to initial article: File on 1980 Paris Bombing Revealed

Reproduced under the fair dealings provision of the Copyright Act

 November 20, 2008 at 8:29 PM EST

OTTAWA — The author of the 1980 bombing of a synagogue paraded in the streets of Paris with two fake Cypriot passports, and carried a stack of $100 U.S. bills to pay for the material used in his deadly deed, according to French police records released Thursday.

The newly unsealed documents are part of the extradition case against Hassan Diab, an Ottawa sociology professor and Canadian citizen born and raised in Lebanon who was arrested in connection with the bombing last week.

According to information collected by French authorities since the 1980 attack, the bomber bought a Suzuki motorcycle for $1,000 U.S. at a store named Moto Shopping Etoile on Sept. 23.

Two days later, the bespectacled terrorist rented a Citroën GS in the French capital.
 
 About 10 kilograms of explosives were stashed in bags at the back of the bike, which was blown up 15 metres away from the Copernic Street synagogue on Oct. 3, killing four people and injuring about 40 others. A few days later, the car was found abandoned in a parking lot, with leftover food inside.

During his stay in Paris, the alleged terrorist was also caught stealing wire cutters and paid $100 U.S. for a night at his Celtic Hotel room with a prostitute, who pointed out his smoking habits and the fact he was circumcised.

French authorities feel the carnage would have been much worse had the bomb detonated 25 minutes later, as hundreds of worshippers were exiting, and if security measures had not prevented the terrorist from parking the motorcycle any closer.

Twenty-eight years later, Mr. Diab appeared in an Ottawa court, fighting extradition to France where he is accused of murder, attempted murder, and willful destruction of property by an organized group, all in relation to attack ...

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20081120.wdiab1120/BNStory?cid=al_gam_nletter_newsUp


Offline George Wallace

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2008, 19:00:17 »
Reproduced under the Fair Dealings provisions of the Copyright Act:    (Link in Title)

Wife says accused prof is innocent in Paris blast

Updated: Fri Nov. 21 2008 13:58:40

The Canadian Press

OTTAWA — The wife of a university professor accused in a 1980 Paris terrorist bombing says she is confident her husband had nothing to do with the attack.

French police allege Hassan Diab played a role in the blast at a synagogue which killed four people. They are seeking his extradition.

Diab's wife, Rania Tfaily, herself a university professor, told an Ontario Superior Court hearing on Friday she believes the charges against him are a mistake.

She says she's prepared to post thousands of dollars in bail.

Diab has been in custody since his arrest last week and is seeking bail as part of his extradition hearing.

Tfaily says their relationship has been strained in the last year, but she still supports him.

"I believe he's innocent, I've known him for some time," Tfaily told Justice Michel Charbonneau of Ontario Superior Court.

Questioned by federal lawyer Claude Lefrancois, she said she and Diab had discussed political events throughout their relationship including terrorism, the deaths of innocent people and mass murder.

"I know enough of that to realize he would never do such a thing," she said.

"It is not going to be the first time or the last time that innocent people are accused," she said.

The RCMP arrested Diab, 55, at the request of French authorities, who submitted affidavits to back their claim of Diab's involvement in the deadly attack.

The evidence includes claims by French police that Diab used an alias and a false Cypriot passport to enter France in 1980 before buying a motorscooter that carried explosives that detonated outside the synagogue.

The evidence also includes police sketches of the bombing suspect based on witness descriptions, and old passport photos.

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Offline George Wallace

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2008, 19:04:35 »
Reproduced under the Fair Dealings provisions of the Copyright Act:    (Link in Title)


Bombing suspect's ex-wife questioned his marriage motivation

Terrorist allegations come as complete surprise
Cassandra Drudi, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Sunday, November 23, 2008
The American ex-wife of a man accused in one of Europe's most shocking terrorist incidents suspected their marriage may have been a ploy to get an U.S. green card and was not surprised when she was questioned by authorities about their relationship a few weeks ago.

"That was under suspect from the very get-go," said Heather Winne, 35, of Hassan Naim Diab's marriage intentions.

A green card, or permanent resident card, gives its bearer official immigration status in the United States.

Mr. Diab, 55, was arrested at his Hull apartment on Nov. 13. He is wanted by French authorities in connection with a terrorist bombing at a Paris synagogue in October 1980 that killed four and injured dozens.

The allegations against Mr. Diab came as a shock to Ms. Winne, but she was not surprised that someone might want to question her about their relationship.

"The bombing, yes, I was surprised about. It totally took me off guard."

Ms. Winne was questioned for several hours while at work. She would not say who had questioned her.

Ms. Winne and Mr. Diab met in 1993 when he was an adjunct professor at Syracuse University where she was taking sociology classes, Ms. Winne said. They married in 1994 and separated in October 1995, when their daughter was born. The divorce was finalized in 1996.

"When my daughter was born things kind of took a turn for the worst," she said.

Ms. Winne's daughter, now 13, had been in contact with Mr. Diab over the phone and online until about two weeks before "this whole episode" took place, she said.

"Things came out online maybe a week after I was spoken to," Ms. Winne said. "I've followed the story very close, so I'm just waiting to hear the outcome."

René Duval, Mr. Diab's lawyer, said the idea that his client may have been motivated to marry Ms. Winne for U.S. permanent resident status is unfounded.

"Based on my confidential knowledge of certain information, this is sheer nonsense. This is yet again another way of trying to discredit Mr. Diab," he said.

"It's basically a smearing campaign. That's what it is."

© The Ottawa Citizen 2008



« Last Edit: November 23, 2008, 19:17:44 by George Wallace »
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Offline twistedcables

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2008, 21:51:12 »
Hence the attention paid to immigration policies and fighting terrorism.  It's not about being xenophobic - that's just stupid - it's about taking a critical look at entry points as a natural course of action in any coherent security program.
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Offline FastEddy

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2008, 12:38:30 »
[quote
[/quote]

What would you expect a Wife or Mother to say ?.

Let the Courts and his peers decide if he's Innocent.

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Offline Spanky

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2008, 15:22:30 »
Oh his wife says he's innocent!  Well, that's good enough for me!  ::)
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Offline D3

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2008, 16:11:00 »
What do his neighbours say?  Was he " A nice quiet guy"

Offline Greymatters

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2008, 18:44:54 »
“Secrecy in Jihad is a Legitimate Duty - Security Manual" (El Pais [Madrid], November 10).

Unlikely, but has anyone found a link to a copy of this available on-line?

Offline leroi

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2008, 11:13:05 »
This slide show by Martin Rudner and Angela Gendron is worth viewing. Martin Rudner has been warning Canadians of the internal threat for some time. Unfortunately, Canadian MSM and some politicians have often not taken him seriously.

Penetrating Terror Threats: Counterintelligence as Counter Terrorism.

(Courtesy of The Canadian Centre of Intelligence And Security Studies.)

http://www.cacp.ca/media/events/efiles/103/DrMartinRudnerMs.pdf


***Mods, please feel free to move***

Offline Greymatters

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2008, 11:38:17 »
That organization (CCISS) was only formed in 2002 - saying its been around 'for some time' is an exaggeration.

Having said that, its nice to see a half-decent presentation on the subject...


Offline leroi

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2008, 12:06:00 »
This slide show by Martin Rudner and Angela Gendron is worth viewing. Martin Rudner has been warning Canadians of the internal threat for some time. Unfortunately, Canadian MSM and some politicians have often not taken him serious.


Actually Greymatters, if you re-read my highlighted sentence above, you'll see that's not what I said. It makes no claim that the organization has been around 'for some time.' My sentnce indicates Martin Rudner has been warning Canadians 'for some time'.



Offline Greymatters

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2008, 13:34:34 »
My error, I was going by the org not the person...

Offline George Wallace

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2008, 20:25:54 »
Reproduced under the Fair Dealings provisions of the Copyright Act.    (Link in Title)

Ottawa prof loses bid for bail in 1980 bombing case


Updated: Thu Dec. 04 2008 10:10:52

The Canadian Press

A university professor facing murder charges from a 1980 bombing in Paris has been denied bail as he awaits hearings for extradition to France.

Hassan Diab has been in custody since his arrest Nov. 13 at the request of French authorities, who allege he was involved in the explosion that killed four people outside a synagogue in the French capital.

Canadian government lawyers had argued Diab would be a flight risk if he was allowed to go free before the extradition proceedings begin, likely next month.

Ontario Superior Court Justice Michel Charbonneau agreed, saying in his ruling Wednesday that "all the ingredients exist to spur a flight in this case."

Charbonneau said evidence in the bail hearings last month -- including extensive trips in and out of Lebanon from 1998 to 2006 and a history of residence in several countries -- suggests Diab "does not have any real ties anywhere."

The judge added that evidence provided by the French government, while circumstantial, will "more likely than not" meet the threshold to justify extradition.

He said he was not basing his decision to keep Diab in custody on the basis of the information provided by the French government -- which could eventually could "fall like a house of cards" in a trial -- but noted the burden of proof for extradition is lower.

French police affidavits claim evidence links Diab, 55, to the purchase of a motor scooter that was used to place the explosives in front of the synagogue. French authorities allege he belonged to a terrorist group backing an independent Palestinian state at the time.

But Diab's Quebec-based lawyer, Rene Duval, argued it was a case of mistaken identity and said Diab was attending university in Beirut, Lebanon, at the time of the attack.

Diab has been a part-time sociology lecturer at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa for the last year.

His wife, Rania Tfaily, is a full-time professor at Carleton University and offered to put up bail and vouch for Diab's release conditions.

But Charbonneau noted the relationship between Diab and Tfaily, 24 years younger than Diab, was unstable and had only begun in 2006 after Tfaily obtained her position at Carleton University.

The judge noted Diab moved from Tfaily's Ottawa condominium last year into an apartment sublet in Gatineau, Que., and the pair gave contradictory reasons for the separation as well as the amount of time Diab later spent at Tfaily's residence.

Charbonneau also said Diab's failure to report the loss of his passport in 1981 for nearly two years "suggests he may have familiarity with forged documents." Part of the French evidence centres on the lost passport, which Italian police found on a man they arrested in 1981.

A Quebec judge in Gatineau will hear a request Thursday for the transfer to French authorities of evidence and material the RCMP seized from Diab's apartment when he was arrested. France has until Dec. 28 to formally request extradition, and hearings to decide whether he should be sent to France are likely to begin in late January or February.

The judge hearing the extradition case must be convinced a jury of reasonably informed Canadians could find Diab guilty based on the evidence France has provided.

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Offline George Wallace

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2008, 08:20:24 »
Reproduced under the Fair Dealings provisions of the Copyright Act.    (Link in Title)

Police defuse bombs at Paris department store

A Paris news agency says an Afghan group has taken responsibility for explosives that were planted in a high-end Paris department store.


16/12/2008 7:39:30 AM

CTV.ca News Staff

Police defused the bombs earlier today after the explosives were found in the rest rooms of the prestigious Printemps Department Store, a favoured shopping spot with tourists.

The store was evacuated and anti-crime brigades and the bomb squad were called in. French TV later reported that five devices had been located and disarmed. No one was injured during the incident.

CTV's London Bureau Chief Tom Kennedy told Canada AM that authorities are trying to determine how serious the threat was.

He said after authorities neutralized the bombs, government officials announced that there were no detonators attached to the devices.

"We also know there was a phone call that went to Agence France Presse in Paris, (telling AFP) to warn the police that these devices were in the department store. Nevertheless, there is a lot of concern," Kennedy said, speaking from London.

"The group claiming responsibility is called the Afghan Revolutionary Front. They're calling for the removal from Afghanistan of all French troops by early in the new year."

Kennedy said little else is known about the group. AFP reported that the group said the bombs were supposed to go off on Wednesday. France has about 3,000 troops in Afghanistan.
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Offline leroi

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2009, 18:11:44 »

By Ian MacLeod, Ottawa Citizen

(Reproduced in accordance with the Fair Dealing Provision of the Copyright Act.)

http://canadianarmedforcesblogger.blogspot.com/2009/02/number-of-homegrown-suspected.html

Number of Homegrown Suspected Terrorists Higher Than Ever: RCMP


OTTAWA, Ontario — Canadians should be concerned but shouldn’t overreact to news that more homegrown extremists and suspected terrorists are believed operating here than ever before, says the RCMP’s top national security officer.

In his first in-depth interview since assuming command of the nascent National Security Criminal Investigations unit, Assistant Commissioner Bob Paulson said more terrorism arrests are expected in coming months.

“The threat we’re facing today is as threatening as it’s ever been,” he said during a hour-long talk in his headquarter’s office this week. “We’re as busy as we’ve ever been and a little busier, frankly,” but he added that the sky is not falling.

“You want Canadians and people who have a role to play to be engaged and you want them to understand the nature of the threat, but you have to balance that against the Chicken Little criticism.

“Even discussing national security investigations publicly and openly runs the risk of being misunderstood of saying, ‘the sky is falling.’ The threat is a significant threat (and) we and other agencies of the government are actively managing that threat.”

He said the increase in national security criminal cases — from 848 last May to an undisclosed but larger number now — is “marginal” and “nothing that people ought to be excessively worried about. That’s what we get paid to do.”

More concerning is the evolving origin of the threat.

“Historically, it’s always been the threat from somewhere else in the world coming over here. But it’s no secret to anyone that a larger part of the threat is the so-called homegrown threat and that’s certainly the lion’s share of the threat that we’re dealing with.”

Homegrown radicalization is now at the top of the government’s national security agenda. Several of the biggest terror attacks and threats in the West in recent years, from the transit attacks in Madrid and London to the foiled “liquid bomb” airline plotters, have come from previously unremarkable, law-abiding citizens largely unknown to authorities.

The official concern is also partly a reflection of concerns about potential blowback from Canada’s involvement in Afghanistan and the terrorism prosecutions of Ottawa’s Momin Khawaja and the pending “Toronto 18” cases.

NSCI has laid charges in two other terrorism cases — the continuing trial of a Quebec man charged with supporting the Global Islamic Media Front, the propaganda arm of al-Qaida, and last year’s arrest of an Ontario man for allegedly collecting money for the outlawed Tamil Tigers, the only person ever charged with terrorist financing in Canada.


The stinging 2006 report and recommendations of the O’Connor Commission into the Maher Arar affair led to a fundamental re-organization of NSCI, with a priority on centralized oversight of national security investigations, including targeting, evidence-based decision-making, information collection and sharing and quality control.

“My desire (is) to re-establish a trust with people,” said the assistant commissioner, whose police career ranges from general patrol duties in British Columbia to senior positions fighting the Hells Angels and organized crime. Now 50, the Lachute, Que., native joined the Mounties in 1986 after a stint as a Canadian Forces pilot.

Since taking over NSCI in May, “I’m very satisfied that we have the business processes and systems that permit me to defend the criticism that we’re loosey-goosey sharing information all the time. The RCMP has pulled out all the stops in terms of implementing O’Connor’s recommendations and there were considerable costs associated to that.”

He also commented on:

• The need for manufacturers of leading-edge communications equipment to “build in a backdoor for authorities who — when properly authorized by the judiciary as we have always had to have been — can get access so that we don’t have to build research and development commensurate with leading state-of-the-art technology.”

In previous cases where judges authorized police to intercept suspects’ electronic communications, “if the gizmo was the latest version, then our tech guys would say, ‘we don’t know where to hook it up.’

“The objectives of justice shouldn’t be defeated by advancements in technology if everybody understands and signs off on the fact that the processes that permit authorizations of the state to eavesdrop or intercept are properly governed.”

• On co-operation with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service: “As good as it’s ever been.”

• On whether he knows why the Americans continue to harbour suspicions of terrorism against Maher Arar. “No.”

• On why there have been no espionage arrests in Canada in recent years, despite repeated statements by CSIS and others that some foreign intelligence services are engaged in aggressive industrial, economic and state-secret spying (and proliferation activities) in Canada:

“Oh yeah, it’s going on. My objective in this program is to bring these cases that come to our attention to resolution through prosecution, that’s my preferred course of action. But there are alternative ways of dealing with some of these threats (such as) disruption, and sometimes we’re forced to do that. You can’t arrest your way out and charge your way out of everything. So sometimes, there’s maybe just confronting people and saying, ‘we’re on to you, cut it out.’ ”

• On the importance of counter-radicalization philosophies and reaching out to Muslim, Sri Lankan, East Indian and other ethnic communities in Canada.

“We are seeing people accepting us, but we continue to face day-to-day-to-day suspicious of our motives. When I was a uniformed police officer, the extent to which I was successful as a criminal investigator was entirely dependent on the contacts I had in the community. And it’s not informants, it’s being able to persuade people that the problems that we face as police are their problems and if people buy in, which they ought to, then you got something.”

But there’s fine line to walk between that and being seen as recruiting sources or spying on the community.

“If the community senses that at all, then it’s ineffective, the trust is gone.”

Offline old medic

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2009, 00:09:00 »
Partner of accused terrorist to stand by her man
By Jim Brown, THE CANADIAN PRESS
23 March 2009
Quote
OTTAWA — The common-law wife of accused terrorist Hassan Diab says the romantic bloom is off their relationship — but she’s still willing to vouch for his innocence and keep tabs on him if he’s released on bail.

Rania Tfaily, testifying Monday at an Ontario Superior Court hearing, acknowledged she was “annoyed and upset” to discover last year that Diab was having an affair with another woman.,

But that doesn’t change the fact that, in her view, he can’t be guilty of a 1980 synagogue bombing that took four lives in Paris.

“I know his political views,” Tfaily, an assistant professor of demographics at Carleton University, told Justice Robert Maranger. “I know he’s disgusted by mass killing of innocent people.”

Diab, a Lebanese-born Canadian citizen and part-time instructor in sociology at both Carleton and the University of Ottawa, is seeking release on bail while he awaits an extradition hearing later this year.

French authorities want to try him in Paris on charges of murder, attempted murder and destruction of property in the synagogue attack nearly three decades ago.

Tfaily has offered to be Diab’s principal surety, the person responsible for monitoring him and seeing that he abides by any bail conditions.

“It’s not out of love,” she testified. “He’s a nice man but I’m not in love with him. . . . After some time love wears off.”

Nevertheless, said Tfaily, she couldn’t live with herself if she let a man she believes to be innocent remain in jail out of jealousy.

“He’s not charged with marital infidelity,” she said. “This is a criminal case.”

Crown prosecutors oppose Diab’s release. They say there’s a risk he could flee given the seriousness of the charges he faces in France.

But defence lawyer Donald Bayne questioned the strength of the French case, saying the evidence offered would never stand up to scrutiny in Canada.

“This is an extremely weak, criminal case,” said Bayne, arguing that the eyewitness identifications, handwriting analysis and secret intelligence used to buttress the French charges are all suspect.

Diab has told the court he’s willing to abide by whatever bail conditions are imposed, including the wearing of an electronic monitoring device to ensure he remains in the Ottawa area.

Crown attorney Suzanne Schriek raised questions about how Tfaily can act as an effective overseer of bail conditions, given the fact that Diab has deceived her in the past about his travels and his relationships with other women.

She painted him as a man who has engaged in a series of “marriages of convenience” over the years, with extensive contacts in several countries that make him a risk to flee Canada before the extradition can be concluded.
re-answering vision questions since 2004.

Offline leroi

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2009, 23:30:05 »
Are We Safe Yet?
Eight Years After 9/11, Canada is Still Far From Secure


http://www.walrusmagazine.com/articles/2009.05-security-are-we-safe-yet/

The Walrus: April 19, 2009
Daniel Stoffman

(Reproduced in accordance with the Fair Dealing Provision of the Copyright Act.)

Quote
Imagine, if you will, the following scenario: Terrorists on a small ship approach the Atlantic coast of North America. They’ve got one medium-range missile to carry one small nuclear weapon. As it detonates at high altitude, the bomb triggers a surge of electromagnetic radiation. Voltage spikes fry electrical and electronic equipment. Lights, phones, TV, radio — nothing works. The food in the fridge is rotting. Water stops flowing from taps, because the electrical systems that govern the local reservoir are dead. Dead, too, is the ignition in your car. In the worst-case scenario, we are effectively thrown back to pre-modern times. We have to relearn the survival skills of our ancestors. The hardiest make it, but many don’t.

An electromagnetic pulse attack is the sort of thing that keeps counterterrorism experts up at night. Depending on the blast’s size and location, such an attack could leave all of North America in primitive conditions. The emp threat typifies the terrorist threat. The chances of it happening are low at any given time. But it could happen, because there are international terrorists with the motivation, brains, and patience to pull it off. Osama bin Laden has said it is his “religious duty” to acquire nuclear weapons to attack the West. And al Qaeda has repeatedly cited Canada as one of its targets.

In another nuclear nightmare, terrorists detonate a weapon on the ground. On October 11, 2001, a cia agent code named Dragonfire reported that al Qaeda had stolen a ten-kiloton bomb in Russia and successfully smuggled it into New York City. Exploded at noon in midtown Manhattan, the bomb would have killed 500,000 people immediately, and hundreds of thousands more from collapsing buildings, fire, and fallout.

Dragonfire turned out to be wrong, and the intervening years have seen no major attacks on North American soil. But does that mean we’re safe? Graham Allison, an expert on the threat of nuclear terrorism and director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, puts the answer this way: “If the US and other governments just keep doing what they are doing today, a nuclear terrorist attack in a major city is more likely than not by 2014.”

The attacks by al Qaeda on September 11, 2001, killed 2,974 people, including twenty-four Canadians. Since then, authorities in this country have taken several steps to make life harder for terrorists. John Thompson, who heads the Mackenzie Institute, a Toronto-based think tank that studies political instability and organized violence, has a three-part answer to the question of whether or not these measures have made us safer: “Yes, no, and maybe.”

On the face of it, we should be safer. After 9/11, the federal government rushed the Anti-terrorism Act into law, giving police and intelligence agencies broad new powers, including enhanced use of electronic surveillance and the right to arrest people suspected of planning to commit a terrorist act. As well, Ottawa reorganized its security apparatus: It created the new Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, to improve coordination and information sharing among agencies responsible for national security. It gave the Communications Security Establishment new powers to eavesdrop on private communications. It created the Integrated Threat Assessment Centre. And it launched integrated national security enforcement teams in various parts of Canada, with the aim of disrupting and preventing terrorist activities. There have also been other, more modest improvements. Checked baggage is now screened at Canadian airports, reducing the danger of another Air India disaster. Closed-circuit TV and an increased police presence are helping to protect Canadian transit systems.

All told, we’re now spending $25 billion a year on national security — a figure that encompasses defence, the rcmp, intelligence services, and air, border, and coastal security. Not included in that estimate is the value of the time spent by air travellers lining up to empty their pockets and take off their shoes at security checkpoints. Slowdowns because of increased security at the US land border are costing individuals and businesses millions more. Then there is the curtailed privacy that comes with counterterrorism. It’s too late to do anything once the suicide bomber has walked through the turnstile of the subway station; you have to find out about his plans before he puts them into action, which means security operatives must snoop and watch and eavesdrop. Citizens of totalitarian countries take such things for granted. Most Canadians don’t, at least not yet.

Martin Rudner, founding director of the Canadian Centre of Intelligence and Security Studies at Carleton University, believes the costs of security are worth it. “There is no question in my mind,” he says, “that the reason Canada has been spared a deadly attack since 9/11 is not because the terrorists haven’t tried, but because counterterrorism has succeeded.” To take one example, the strategy of pre-emptive enforcement saw its first visible results last fall, when Canadian prosecutors won their first convictions under the Anti-terrorism Act.

Neither of the convicted individuals had actually committed an act of terrorism, but both, the courts decided, were helping to prepare for such acts. One of them was only seventeen in 2006, when he was arrested for attending two training camps held by the so-called “Toronto 18” cell. He also stole things for the group, which was allegedly scheming to bomb targets in Ontario and behead Prime Minister Stephen Harper. In another case, an Ottawa software developer was found guilty of conspiring to set off fertilizer bombs in England in 2004.

In both instances, the threats were from Islamist terrorism, which has become nearly synonymous with terrorism itself. “Islamist,” in this context, means a radical fundamentalist who rejects the concept of a secular, democratic state, and is prepared to use violence to impose a rigid theocratic rule on society. Of course, not all terrorists are Islamic fundamentalists, but non-Islamist terror groups, such as the Tamil Tigers, are obsessed with local struggles. Most pose little threat to Canada, with the major exception thus far being the Sikh separatists who planted bombs on two airplanes departing from Canada on June 22, 1985, killing a total of 331 people.

Al Qaeda has named Western democracies in general, and Canada in particular, as its enemies. In November 2002, Osama bin Laden warned in a statement broadcast on the Arabic television station Al Jazeera that Canada would be attacked because of its participation in the war in Afghanistan. “What do your governments want from their alliance with America in attacking us in Afghanistan?” he asked. “I mention in particular Britain, France, Italy, Canada, Germany, and Australia. Why should fear, killing, destruction, displacement, orphaning, and widowing continue to be our lot, while security, stability, and happiness be your lot? This is unfair. It is time that we get even. You will be killed just as you kill, and will be bombed just as you bomb.”

In 2004, an al Qaeda manual named Canada as the terrorists’ fifth most important “Christian” target. The people making these threats, says Rudner, are “well-educated intellectuals. Many of the mujahedeen of al Qaeda are engineers and doctors and other professionals. They mean what they say.”

One hundred and fifty jihadist plots have been identified in Europe, North America, and Australia since 9/11. Because of counterterrorism, few have been successful, with the notable exceptions of the attacks on the Madrid commuter trains in 2004, and the London transit system in 2005. Some of the failed plots would have had devastating results. In December 2001, a British convert to Islam tried to blow up a transatlantic flight carrying 198 people by igniting explosives in his shoe. In June 2007, terrorists left two car bombs in central London. One of the cars contained sixty litres of gasoline, gas cylinders, and nails. It was parked outside a nightclub, and if detonated would have killed hundreds of people. In February in London, a trial began of eight men charged with conspiring to kill thousands of people in 2006, by blowing up seven transatlantic planes using liquid bombs made from soft drink bottles and batteries. Two of the targets were Air Canada flights destined for Toronto and Montreal.

The scale of the threat is yet another reason to take it seriously. In 1993, al Qaeda started trying to buy highly enriched uranium in Sudan. And al Qaeda documents seized in Afghanistan gave details of the terror network’s attempts to obtain nuclear materials over several years, until they were expelled from the country after 9/11. “Nothing we know about al Qaeda’s ideology suggests they would have any inhibitions about using such weapons if they could acquire them,” says Wesley Wark, a terrorism expert at the Munk Centre for International Studies at the University of Toronto. “A group with that capacity may simply be undeterrable, both in terms of measures the state would take and any phenomenon of self-deterrence — so, an intent to acquire them and use them, and no restraints. That is why the nightmare is a nightmare.”

According to Matthew Bunn, co-principal investigator of the Project on Managing the Atom at Harvard’s Belfer Center, the ingredients for nuclear weapons exist in hundreds of buildings in forty countries. Some sites are secure, he says, but others “have little more than a night watchman and a chain-link fence.” Once terrorists obtained nuclear material, it would be easy for them to import it into Canada; only 4 percent of containers arriving at our ports are inspected to determine their contents.

Another weapon of mass destruction is biological. To grasp the potential of such an attack, consider a war game called Dark Winter that was conducted by the United States just prior to 9/11 to simulate the effects of a smallpox strike. In the exercise, six days after the first identified case, in Oklahoma City, 2,000 people had the disease and 300 were dead. The worst case predicted by the simulation saw three million Americans infected and one million killed. Should this actually happen, hundreds of thousands of Canadians could die, too.

(page 2 on link above)

Edit: Re-format
« Last Edit: April 14, 2009, 04:01:25 by leroi »

Offline leroi

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2009, 19:26:53 »

Toronto Man Charged With Trying To Export Nuclear Technology To Iran

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2009/04/17/toronto-rcmp-arrest-nuclear-uranium-trandsducers.html

(Placed here in accordance with the Fair Dealing Provision of the Copyright Act.)


CBC News: April 17, 2009

A Toronto man is facing charges of illegally trying to export nuclear technology to Iran, the RCMP said Friday. The charges stem from an alleged attempt to illegally move pressure transducers from Boston to Toronto and onto Dubai, with Iran as the final destination, police said.

"The declared point of destination was Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates. However, we have evidence to support the fact that its ultimate destination was Iran," RCMP Insp. Greg Johnson told a press conference.

The pressure transducers that were seized are used in the uranium enrichment process for weapons-grade products, Johnson said. The transducers have a legitimate commercial use but also can be used for military purposes, the RCMP said.

Police confirmed at least two devices were seized and some of the devices were found when a search warrant was executed in Toronto.

Mahmoud Yadegari, 35, is facing charges under the Customs Act, Export Import Permits Act and the United Nations Act for violating UN sanctions on Iran. Iran insists it is enriching uranium to produce nuclear energy for civilian purposes, but the United States and some European countries accuse Tehran of secretly seeking to build nuclear weapons.

Yadegari, who is a Canadian citizen from Iran, is being held in police custody awaiting a bail hearing in Toronto. Police allege the man took steps to conceal the identification of the transducers so he could export them without required permits.

The charges were made following an eight-week investigation by the RCMP, customs agents, the Department of Foreign Affairs and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, police said. The investigation is ongoing, Johnson said.

Johnson declined to comment on whether Yadegari is believed to be a part of a larger network or if other arrests related to the devices are pending.

Offline lovinmysapper

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #23 on: April 17, 2009, 20:49:00 »
I would like to comment on Dr Martin Rudner's presentation, I have been fortunate to study under him this man is amazing... Agreed he has been warning Canadians for some time now!
As he so eloquently puts it " Imagine this a 20 yr business plan,with extremely intelligent officials in charge" "Doctors, Lawyers MBA's Scientists"..."Imagine board rooms occupied with officials conducting audits and PER's" "This is a well organized, exercised business operation  or another word we are familiar with "Terrorists"

When you look at his presentation take note to the success of every operation that has been conducted in the business plan! they even have Business Continuity Plans !!!!!


THEY WALK AMONG US!!!! enough said!!!

Pain is your friend, your allie, it will tell you when you are seriously injured, it will keep you awake and angry, and remind you to finish the job and get the hell home. But you know the best thing about pain? ....."It lets you know you're not dead yet"!

If you can't stand behind our troops feel free to stand infront of them!!!!!

Offline leroi

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Re: They Walk Among Us
« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2009, 23:24:57 »
I would like to comment on Dr Martin Rudner's presentation, I have been fortunate to study under him this man is amazing... Agreed he has been warning Canadians for some time now!
As he so eloquently puts it " Imagine this a 20 yr business plan,with extremely intelligent officials in charge" "Doctors, Lawyers MBA's Scientists"..."Imagine board rooms occupied with officials conducting audits and PER's" "This is a well organized, exercised business operation  or another word we are familiar with "Terrorists"

When you look at his presentation take note to the success of every operation that has been conducted in the business plan! they even have Business Continuity Plans !!!!!


THEY WALK AMONG US!!!! enough said!!!

Lovinmysapper,

You are fortunate to have studied under him.  I don't move in military circles and live in a world, for the main part, that absolutely doesn't believe Canada has any internal threats!

Yes, THEY WALK AMONG US ... one of the Toronto 18's (Toronto 11 now?) camps was a 20 minute car ride from where I live.

« Last Edit: April 18, 2009, 11:45:37 by leroi »