Author Topic: Mexico Drug War and Instability  (Read 68831 times)

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Offline Thucydides

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #50 on: February 25, 2011, 11:03:27 »
The Drug War may become more than a metaphore:

http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/failed-state-watch-how-long-before-u-s-military-confrontation-with-mexico-cartels/

Quote
Failed State Watch: How Long Before U.S. Military Confrontation with Mexico Cartels?
Posted By Alberto de la Cruz On February 24, 2011 @ 12:00 am In Uncategorized | 10 Comments

The violence rolling across Mexico continues to destroy everything and everyone in its path, threatening the further destabilization of an already besieged society teetering on the brink of anarchy. That wave is crashing on our border as Mexican drug cartel-related incidents increase in the United States.

This month’s murder [1] of a U.S. ICE agent and wounding of another — when their armored Suburban was attacked by assailants on a Mexican highway — is just another example of the drug-related crime that has become commonplace in Mexico. The 83 shell casings found at the scene indicate this was a premeditated hit on U.S. agents trying to help the Mexican government in their losing battle against the cartels.

A quick recap of only a few of the other violent crimes that took place in Mexico just the past weeks:

In Guadalupe, five youths believed to be drug dealers were murdered execution style. Their bullet-riddled bodies were then picked up from the scene of the crime, placed in a truck, and delivered to the victim’s homes in a final act of gruesome contempt.

In the city of Juarez, 16 people were murdered in one single day. Five of them were young men traveling in a car who died in a hail of bullets after gunmen forced their vehicle to stop and opened fire. Minutes earlier, a young girl who had accompanied the murdered men had just entered her home after being dropped off, fortunate timing being the only thing that saved her life.

In Acapulco, gunmen in at least ten trucks went on a terror spree through the city. Their indiscriminate gunfire knocked out power to some areas of the city, while they damaged twenty vehicles by setting them on fire or carjacking them to use as roadblocks. One witness described the melee as a war, with bullets flying everywhere. The early morning attack resulted in nine innocent people murdered, including taxi drivers [2], and many more wounded. Later in the day, five more victims were added to the death toll when their dismembered bodies were discovered by the police.

In Veracruz, the dismembered bodies of six unidentified murder victims were thrown outside a surveillance post run by the Mexican Department of Public Safety. The six severed heads and associated body parts were spread about to form a message from the Gulf Cartel.

All of the above violent incidents took place over a few days. While the Mexican government is attempting to break the wave of violence that is overtaking the nation, it has not had much success in stopping the drug cartels who not only threaten the Mexican people but the stability of the Mexican government as well.

That same wave of violence is crashing on our southern border and sending a stream of mayhem into our border states. The drug cartels have no issue using the same brutal methods in the U.S. that they use in Mexico. The rising intensity has prompted Pinal County, Arizona, Sheriff Paul Babeu to state that armed conflict between U.S. police forces and heavily armed drug cartel squads is inevitable:

We’re expecting a conflict. I absolutely believe you’re going to see that happen in the next 30 to 60 days. It’s not like I’m trying to start a war with the cartels. They’re coming through like they own this place, and we’re trying to stop them. I pray that every time, they surrender.



And we’re not just talking about illegal immigrants. We’re talking about cartels that have almost toppled the Mexican government and believe they can come into our county and commit these crimes and acts of violence. This is not going to happen here.

Until our southern border is secured, there is little that law enforcement officers like Sheriff Babeu can do about these attacks. As police departments, they are trained and equipped to deal with domestic crime, not organized and well-funded militant drug cartels with military-style armament. They must do their best to protect civilians as well as their own officers from a formidable menace that comes and goes across the border at will — all with no help or sympathy from the federal government.

While Janet Napolitano and the Department of Homeland Security continue to play politics with the border situation, refusing to admit there is a problem and proclaiming the situation to be improving, our border patrol and law enforcement officers are fending off attacks by soldiers of well-armed, well-funded, and ruthless drug cartels. Sooner rather than later, the wave of violence that is inundating Mexico will come crashing into the U.S. If we do not secure the border, the violence that has become commonplace in Mexico will become commonplace in our bordering states.

Article printed from Pajamas Media: http://pajamasmedia.com

URL to article: http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/failed-state-watch-how-long-before-u-s-military-confrontation-with-mexico-cartels/

URLs in this post:

[1] murder: http://www.ktsm.com/news/six-arrested-in-ice-agent-murder
[2] taxi drivers: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/02/21/501364/main20034382.shtml
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #51 on: July 29, 2011, 05:57:20 »
Further drug/gang turmoil in Mexico - this time a prison riot:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/video-machinegunning-prisoners-riot-2328159.html

How much worse can things get?
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #52 on: September 25, 2011, 08:33:22 »
And yet more, in this report which is reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the Globe and Mail:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/americas/woman-decapitated-in-mexico-in-retaliation-for-social-network-posts/article2179337/
Quote
Woman decapitated in Mexico in retaliation for social-network posts

MARK STEVENSON
MEXICO CITY— The Associated Press

Published Saturday, Sep. 24, 2011

Police found a woman’s decapitated body in a Mexican border city on Saturday, alongside a handwritten sign saying she was killed in retaliation for her postings on a social networking site.

The gruesome killing may be the third so far this month in which people in Nuevo Laredo were killed by a drug cartel for what they said on the internet.

Morelos Canseco, the interior secretary of northern Tamaulipas state, where Nuevo Laredo is located, identified the victim as Marisol Macias Castaneda, a newsroom manager for the Nuevo Laredo newspaper Primera Hora.

The newspaper has not confirmed that title, and an employee of the paper said Macias Castaneda held an administrative post, not a reporting job. The employee was not authorized to be quoted by name.

But it was apparently what the woman posted on the local social networking site, Nuevo Laredo en Vivo, or “Nuevo Laredo Live,” rather than her role at the newspaper, that resulted in her killing.

The site prominently features tip hotlines for the Mexican army, navy and police, and includes a section for reporting the location of drug gang lookouts and drug sales points – possibly the information that angered the cartel.

The message found next to her body on the side of a main thoroughfare referred to the nickname the victim purportedly used on the site, “La Nena de Laredo,” or “Laredo Girl.” Her head was found placed on a large stone piling nearby.

“Nuevo Laredo en Vivo and social networking sites, I’m The Laredo Girl, and I’m here because of my reports, and yours,” the message read. “For those who don’t want to believe, this happened to me because of my actions, for believing in the army and the navy. Thank you for your attention, respectfully, Laredo Girl...ZZZZ.”

The letter “Z” refers to the hyper-violent Zetas drug cartel, which is believed to dominate the city across from Laredo, Texas.

It was unclear how the killers found out her real identity.

By late Saturday, the chat room at Nuevo Laredo en Vivo was abuzz with fellow posters who said they knew the victim from her online postings, and railing against the Zetas, a gang founded by military deserters who have become known for mass killings and gruesome executions.

They described her as a frequent poster, who used a laptop or cell phone to send reports.

“Girl why didn’t she buy a gun given that she was posting reports about the RatZZZ ... why didn’t she buy a gun?” wrote one chat participant under the nickname “Gol.”

Earlier this month, a man and a woman were found hanging dead from an overpass in Nuevo Laredo with a similar message threatening “this is what will happen” to internet users. However, it has not been clearly established whether the two had in fact ever posted any messages, or on what sites.

Residents of Mexican border cities often post under nicknames to report drug gang violence, because the posts allow a certain degree of anonymity.

Social media like local chat rooms and blogs, and networking sites like Twitter and Facebook, are often the only outlet for residents of violence-wracked cities to find out what areas to avoid because of ongoing drug cartel shootouts or attacks.

Local media outlets, whose journalists have been hit by killings, kidnappings and threats, are often too intimidated to report the violence.

Mexico’s Human Rights Commission says eight journalists have been killed in Mexico this year and 74 since 2000. Other press groups cite lower numbers, and figures differ based on the definition of who is a journalist and whether the killings appeared to involve their professional work.

While helpful, social networking posts sometimes are inaccurate and can lead to chaotic situations in cities wracked by gang confrontations. In the Gulf coast state of Veracruz, just south of Tamaulipas, the state government dropped terrorism charges last week against two Twitter users for false posts that officials said caused panic and chaos in late August.


Mexico, a NAFTA and G20 partner, is in some (I don't know how much) danger of slipping into the failing state category - not because of a lack of money or technology but, rather, because the civil power, the government, is unable to maintain law and order.
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline recceguy

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #53 on: September 25, 2011, 08:40:32 »
And yet more, in this report which is reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the Globe and Mail:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/americas/woman-decapitated-in-mexico-in-retaliation-for-social-network-posts/article2179337/

Mexico, a NAFTA and G20 partner, is in some (I don't know how much) danger of slipping into the failing state category - not because of a lack of money or technology but, rather, because the civil power, the government, is unable to maintain law and order.

And it doesn't help when the Obama administration and the BATF are supplying said gangsters with assault weapons through programs like Fast and Furious.
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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #54 on: September 25, 2011, 08:48:00 »
And it doesn't help when the Obama administration and the BATF are supplying said gangsters with assault weapons through programs like Fast and Furious.




It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline 57Chevy

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Re: Collapse of Mexico
« Reply #55 on: September 25, 2011, 09:13:31 »
See the Mexican cartels' main areas of influence :


Updated Cartels map showing disputed areas.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #56 on: September 25, 2011, 17:30:20 »
The following was in the news a couple of weeks ago.

Picture caption: Brutal: The disemboweled corpses of a man (right) and a woman hang from a pedestrian bridge in Nuevo Laredo after they were murdered by a drugs cartel.

                        This sign was left on the bridge, translated from Spanish: 'This is going to happen to all those posting funny things on the internet'


Mexican couple killed, mutilated, hung on bridge over blogging about violence


A couple have been found hanging from a bridge in the Mexican border city of Nuevo Laredo after being disembowelled and mutilated by attackers.

The motive for the gruesome attack was to warn social media users not to criticise Mexican drug cartels on the internet.

Next to the battered bodies was a sign reading: ‘This is going to happen to all those posting funny things on the internet, You better (expletive) pay attention. I’m about to get you.’
 
The woman, thought to be in her 20s, was tied to the bridge from her feet and hands as her body dangled topless with her innards protruding.

The man’s body, also believed to be in his early 20s, was hanging from just his hands.

Online blogging about violence in Mexico is currently one of the loudest ways it is reported, after some traditional media outlets have been silenced by cartel threats.

Bloggers who release information about trafficking have faced threats in the past, but this might be the first warning to social network users, CNN reported.
 
Investigator Ricardo Mancillas Castillo told CNN that this form of torture, including disembowelment, has been seen before in drug-related violence but he has not encountered it before with internet threats.

The investigator said the victims will be almost impossible to identify because of the severe mutilation and there were no witnesses.

The bodies were found on Tuesday morning, which is thought to be 36 hours after they were killed.

It will also be impossible to find out whether the victims actually posted anything online about the cartels too, he said.

The two blogs that the attackers signalled out as a warning to internet users were Al Rojo Vivo and Blog del Narco.
 
Blog del Narco is a site that only posts news in relation to Mexican drug violence.

The site made a statement to CNN, saying that Blog del Narco is not dedicated to criticising crime and added: ‘We are not in favour or against any criminal group, we only inform as things happen.’

While Al Rojo Vivo is a forum where bloggers can make anonymous tips about crime.

Over the last five years more than 34,000 people have died in drug-related violence in the country.
 
SOURCE: Daily Mail
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #57 on: September 25, 2011, 23:43:24 »
At Canadiangunnutz someone posted a link to people being excuted by chainsaw, didn't watch the whole thing, but you know the whole purpose is to terrorize everyone. Mad Max is alive and true. You can bet the population is going to let democracy go in the hopes that someone will stamp out these thugs, at least a dicatorship will generally give you warning to behave before they kill you.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #58 on: September 28, 2011, 20:23:38 »
Even sadder is the role of the current US administration in fueling the violence (and the cover-up by both the politicians and the media):

http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/msm-sheep-ignoring-the-scandal-of-the-century/?print=1

Quote
MSM Sheep: Ignoring the Scandal of the Century

Posted By Bob Owens On September 28, 2011 @ 9:33 am In Uncategorized | 78 Comments

Monday’s revelations by Mike Vanderboegh at Sipsey Street Irregulars [1] and David Codrea at the Gun Rights Examiner [2], corroborated here [3] at PJMedia and expounded upon at Fox News [4], comprise a “smoking gun” of the one of the most stunning political scandals in U.S. history.

As William Lajeunesse writes at Fox:

    Not only did U.S. officials approve, allow and assist in the sale of more than 2,000 guns to the Sinaloa cartel — the federal government used taxpayer money to buy semi-automatic weapons, sold them to criminals and then watched as the guns disappeared.

I don’t wish to understate it: elements of the U.S. Departments of Justice, State, Homeland Security, and Treasury are responsible for supplying an arsenal to narco-terrorists waging a civil war against an American ally. Our federal government may bear responsibility for at least 200 murders committed with “walked” firearms, in what Mexican Attorney General Marisela Morales describes as a “betrayal [5]” of her country by the Obama administration.

Are there legal ramifications? Perhaps. According to Title 18, 2331 of the U.S. Code, Operation Fast and Furious may amount to international terrorism [6], which carries with it stiff penalties for conspiracies that result in homicide [7]. The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations [8] (RICO) Act — which was originally used to prosecute the mafia — and the Arms Export Control Act [9] (AECA) may also fit, as may assorted state and federal charges. Charges may also result from two investigations launched by Mexican authorities, and Mexico could conceivably file charges with the International Criminal Court.

This is objectively the most important political and legal story in America right now.

But despite the revelations from of documents and testimony obtained by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and repeated calls for full disclosure from senators and congressmen, mainstream media organizations have done everything in their power to bury the scandal. This can only be viewed as a partisan media’s attempt to protect a criminal executive branch.

Let’s play “if Bush did it.”

If thousands of firearms had been provided to the Sinaloa cocaine cartel by the Justice Department; and if those guns had been blamed for not one or two, but hundreds of murders by Mexico’s lead prosecutor, would there not be wall-to-wall front page coverage every day on the pages of the New York Times … if Bush were still president?

Under Bush, the MSM did provide blanket coverage for the warrantless wiretapping program — which was deemed legal by the courts and caused no deaths.

If circumstantial evidence, political speeches, and talking points from Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, and President Bush all suggested that the solitary goal of a gunwalking conspiracy was to put American weapons in the hands of criminals in hopes they would commit violent crimes in order to undermine the Constitution and Bill of Rights … the Washington Post columnists would call for impeachment and criminal prosecution each day.

Recall how they breathlessly reported the minute details and speculations of the Valerie Plame affair, which had much smaller stakes.

Instead, both the New York Times and Washington Post have responded to Gunwalker with attempted character assassinations of Congressman Darrell Issa, the lead investigator.

The Post ran a desperate hit piece [10] on Issa, a story turned down by at least two other news organizations and left-wing blog Talking Points Memo for being too thinly sourced. They gave the byline to a reporter returning from a plagiarism suspension.

After that failed to stop Issa, the New York Times produced a hit piece so rife with errors that it amounted to fiction [10].

Among the MSM, only Richard Serrano of the Los Angeles Times, Sharyl Attkisson of CBS News, and William Lajeunesse of Fox News have faithfully reported on the story.

Nobody died in the Watergate break-ins, but the Washington Post’s dogged coverage of the story created a reputation that the now clearly partisan newsletter coasts upon to this day. The New York Times spent untold man-hours and and money exposing the FISA warrantless wiretapping program — to the detriment of the nation’s national security — even though no laws were broken by the wiretaps.

Yet perhaps hundreds have died as a result of this administration’s conspiracy to supply weapons to a narco-terrorist organization, and the crack ABC News investigative team at the Blotter [11] can’t be bothered. 60 Minutes is more enthralled by the murder of an American Nazi [12] than the Obama adminstration’s Reichstag fire [13]. CNN may as well be protecting Saddam again [14]. Need we mention PBS or MSNBC?

The Gunwalker conspiracy is the kind of story that journalists dream of breaking their entire careers. It is now in the palms of their hands: a story in which they can make a difference, take down the evil and corrupt, and ensure justice is served.

Instead of reporting, however, they are complicit. They have chosen to acquiesce to a clear and obvious evil, an aberration of our most basic values. They are no longer watchdogs, but docile sheep.

More news organizations are shrinking, merging, and consolidating as they face a decrease in circulation and credibility. When they die, point back to this moment in time, and write as their epitaph:

    The could have lived, but chose death.

Unlike those they allow this government to terrorize and murder with impunity.

Article printed from Pajamas Media: http://pajamasmedia.com

URL to article: http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/msm-sheep-ignoring-the-scandal-of-the-century/

URLs in this post:

[1] Sipsey Street Irregulars: http://sipseystreetirregulars.blogspot.com/2011/09/vanderboegh-codrea-exclusive-us-govt.html

[2] Gun Rights Examiner: http://www.examiner.com/gun-rights-in-national/breaking-letter-implicates-atf-committing-straw-purchases-for-gunwalker

[3] here: http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/gunwalker-atf-walked-guns-directly-to-cartel-using-taxpayer-dollars/

[4] Fox News: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2011/09/26/us-government-bought-and-sold-weapons-during-fast-and-furious-documents-show/

[5] betrayal: http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-mexico-fast-furious-20110920,0,5544168.story

[6] international terrorism: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/2331.html

[7] conspiracies that result in homicide: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/usc_sec_18_00002332----000-.html

[8] Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racketeer_Influenced_and_Corrupt_Organizations_Act

[9] Arms Export Control Act: http://www.pmddtc.state.gov/regulations_laws/aeca.html

[10] desperate hit piece: http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/the-darrell-issa-hit-piece-most-inaccurate-nyt-article-%E2%80%A6-ever/

[11] Blotter: http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/

[12] murder of an American Nazi: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/09/25/60minutes/main20110803.shtml?tag=contentMain;cbsCarousel

[13] Reichstag fire: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reichstag_fire

[14] protecting Saddam again: http://www.nytimes.com/2003/04/11/opinion/the-news-we-kept-to-ourselves.html
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #59 on: September 28, 2011, 20:35:31 »
Part of Mexico's problem is that fools - right word - like Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano are downplaying Mexico's crisis in order to pander to Hispanic voters in the USA. Thus that stupid woman compares the problems on the Canadian border with those on the Mexican one - an act that actually helps the Mexican drug lords by taking critical US law enforcement and border security resources away from where they are needed and putting them where they help serve her partisan political agenda.


Source:  http://bloviatingzeppelin.blogspot.com/2009/04/napolitano-canadas-border-problem.html - which is worth a read
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #60 on: September 29, 2011, 07:32:29 »
And now courtesy the only person left alive who still stupid enough to believe that the 9/11 terrorists came through Canada, reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the Globe and Mail:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/us-eyes-fencing-along-canadian-border/article2184300/
Quote
U.S. eyes fencing along Canadian border

JIM BRONSKILL OTTAWA
The Canadian Press

Published Thursday, Sep. 29, 2011

The United States is looking at building fences along the border with Canada to help keep out terrorists and other criminals.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency has proposed the use of “fencing and other barriers” on the 49th parallel to manage “trouble spots where passage of cross-border violators is difficult to control.”


A 2008 file photo shows American contractors building a new fence along the U.S. border with Mexico near Tijuana.
Peter Power/The Globe and Mail


The border service is also pondering options including a beefed-up technological presence through increased use of radar, sensors, cameras, drones and vehicle scanners. In addition, it might continue to improve or expand customs facilities at ports of entry.

The agency considered but ruled out the possibility of hiring “significantly more” U.S. Border Patrol agents to increase the rate of inspections, noting staffing has already risen in recent years.

The proposals are spelled out in a new draft report by the border service that examines the possible environmental impact of the various options over the next five to seven years.

Customs and Border Protection is inviting comment on the options and plans a series of public meetings in Washington and several U.S. border communities next month. It will then decide which ideas to pursue.

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano noted last month the challenges of monitoring the vast, sparsely populated northern border region. She stressed manpower, but also a greater reliance on technology.

Ironically, the moves come as Canada and the U.S. try to finalize a perimeter security arrangement that would focus on continental defences while easing border congestion. It would be aimed at speeding passage of goods and people across the Canada-U.S. border, which has become something of a bottleneck since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Relatively speaking, Washington has focused more energy and resources on tightening security along the border with Mexico than at the sprawling one with Canada.

But that may be changing.

A U.S. Government Accountability Office report recently warned that only a small portion of the border with Canada is properly secure. It said U.S. border officers control just 50 kilometres of the 6,400-kilometre boundary.

The Customs and Border Protection report says while fences have been a big element in deterring unauthorized crossings of the U.S.-Mexican border, “it is unlikely that fencing will play as prominent a role” on the northern border, given its length and terrain that varies from prairie to forest.

However, the agency would use fencing and other barriers such as trenches to control movement and sometimes delay people trying to sneak across the border, increasing the likelihood they could be caught, says the report.

It doesn’t provide details about what the fences might look like, but suggests they would be designed to blend into the environment and “complement the natural landscape.”

The approach would also involve upgrading roadways and trails near the border.

“The lack of roads or presence of unmaintained roads impedes efficient surveillance operations,” says the report. “Improving or expanding the roadway and trail networks could improve mobility, allowing agents to patrol more miles each day and shortening response times.”

Over the last two years, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has already made what it calls “critical security improvements along the northern border,” adding inspectors at the ports of entry and Border Patrol agents between ports, as well as modernizing land crossings.

Nearly 3,800 Customs and Border Protection officers scrutinize people and goods at crossings. The number of Border Patrol agents working between crossings along the northern parallel has increased 700 per cent since Sept. 11, 2001. And some three dozen land ports of entry are being modernized.

Unmanned U.S. aircraft patrol about 1,500 kilometres along the northern border from Washington to Minnesota as well as more than 300 kilometres of the Canadian border around New York state and Lake Ontario.


This is nothing but pandering to the Hispanic voters in the US Southwest - "see," Ms. Napolitano says, "we are not singling out Mexico for border security, the Canadians are just as dangerous to our security."

The whole idea of Homeland Security was a bad joke when George W Bush put it together, now it devolved into farce - making the American homeland less secure.



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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #61 on: September 29, 2011, 13:21:11 »
Take a million or two of the unemployed, borrow a couple or three trillion dollars and fence the whole 6,400-kilometre boundary.

Building the infrastructure, the support and the actual construction should take at least five years, say starting the project in 2012.

Machinery manufacturers, home builders, steel workers, laborers, managers will all be happy. Money will flow, the economy will improve.

Only employ union members, buy American only.

Obama: There, I saved you.
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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #62 on: September 29, 2011, 13:27:02 »
Youd be surprised how many Americans believe the hijackers came in through Canada. I find myself constantly correcting and family and their friends.

Say a lie enough I guess.
Posted again...thats six in six.

Offline GAP

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #63 on: September 29, 2011, 13:38:30 »
Take a million or two of the unemployed, borrow a couple or three trillion dollars and fence the whole 6,400-kilometre boundary.

Building the infrastructure, the support and the actual construction should take at least five years, say starting the project in 2012.

Machinery manufacturers, home builders, steel workers, laborers, managers will all be happy. Money will flow, the economy will improve.

Only employ union members, buy American only.

Obama: There, I saved you.

I don't find myself getting all upset about the US wanting to fence everybody out.....they've gotten progressively protectionist/paranoid in the last 20-25 years......to the point that 1984 is coming true....bit by bit..

wanna fence it off....knock your socks off....legal trade is going through the border crossings anyway.....

but in the meantime....Canada needs to explore other markets...eg: Asia...not so much Europe......we've been lazy because trading with the US has been easy and close...

 :2c:
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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #64 on: September 29, 2011, 13:43:55 »
This is nothing but pandering to the Hispanic voters in the US Southwest - "see," Ms. Napolitano says, "we are not singling out Mexico for border security, the Canadians are just as dangerous to our security."
With the fire fueled by some border state politicians.....
Quote
With the U.S.-Canada border under sudden intense scrutiny in the United States, a handful of American senators placed it under an ever-harsher spotlight Thursday by asking for the military’s help in patrolling the expansive boundary.

Democratic senators from states located near or along the 6,400-kilometre border are asking the U.S. Department of Defense to provide military radar in an effort to nab drug traffickers who use low-flying aircraft to move their product from Canada into the United States.

New York Sen. Charles Schumer is leading the charge and sent a letter Thursday to Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano to formally request help.

Schumer says statistics from media reports and Homeland Security show that drug smuggling from Canada into the U.S. is on a dramatic upswing. According to a region-by-region report he released, border seizures of marijuana increased by 22 per cent from 2007 to 2009.

From 2004 to 2009, seizures of ecstasy increased sixfold, to more than two million doses. Heroin and cocaine seizures have also significantly increased in the past few years.

Schumer was joined in his request by fellow New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Jon Tester of Montana and Herb Kohl of Wisconsin.

“Given what is at stake in combating illegal cross-border activity, and given its past success, (we) write to ask your agencies to co-ordinate in determining whether there are any available military technological assets anywhere around the world that can be more effectively deployed along our northern border to combat drug smuggling,” the senators wrote in the letter ....
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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #65 on: September 29, 2011, 13:48:15 »
Take a million or two of the unemployed, borrow a couple or three trillion dollars and fence the whole 6,400-kilometre boundary.

Building the infrastructure, the support and the actual construction should take at least five years, say starting the project in 2012.

Machinery manufacturers, home builders, steel workers, laborers, managers will all be happy. Money will flow, the economy will improve.

Only employ union members, buy American only.

Obama: There, I saved you.

You don't need that much: In my younger days around the farm, we use to be able to string about 500 feet of cow fence ad day with just three of us and a tractor. That's a mile every two weeks. 6,400 Km = 4,000 miles, so divide by  23 times two work weeks in a year (we're giving ourselves four weeks vacation) and basically, 175 teams of three can do the job.

OOPS! I missed the last sentence: It's going to be done by unionized personnel. Forget I talked.

By the way ERC, how did you get hold of Napoloitano's official Homeland Security picture ???

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #66 on: September 29, 2011, 16:53:50 »
The communists put up walls in Europe between themselves and free countries, why wouldn't they do the same between the States and the free NA countries either side of them? ;)
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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #67 on: September 29, 2011, 17:34:51 »
Well when you consider the lead up to the 1812 war, the states butting up to Canada were not interested in warring with their best customer at all, it was all driven by other states.

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #68 on: September 29, 2011, 18:55:39 »
A few years ago my wife and I were in the lower Rio Grande valley for a month in the winter. We took a boat tour on the Rio Grande. This was a high illegal crossing area and a fence had been authorized. It was a fiasco, partly because the EPA would not allow it to be put along the river bank for environmental reasons. Instead it was several hundred metres in land and the illegals just made their way past it unobserved.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #69 on: September 29, 2011, 19:07:07 »
More on the complicity of the Administration:

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/furious_revelation_OhK6TBqPlEpRglHjsSbiBI#ixzz1ZKCGnptv

Quote
A 'Furious' revelation
Feds sold guns to drug gangs

Last Updated: 5:10 AM, September 29, 2011

Posted: 10:24 PM, September 28, 2011

This just might be the smoking gun we’ve been waiting for to break the festering “Fast and Furious” gun-running scandal wide open: the Department of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives apparently ordered one of its own agents to purchase firearms with taxpayer money, and sell them directly to a Mexican drug cartel.

Let that sink in: After months of pretending that “Fast and Furious” was a botched surveillance operation of illegal gun-running spearheaded by the ATF and the US attorney’s office in Phoenix, it turns out that the government itself was selling guns to the bad guys.

Agent John Dodson was ordered to buy four Draco pistols for cash and even got a letter from his supervisor, David Voth, authorizing a federally licensed gun dealer to sell him the guns without bothering about the necessary paperwork.

“Please accept this letter in lieu of completing an ATF Form 4473 for the purchase of four (4) CAI, Model Draco, 7.62x39 mm pistols, by Special Agent John Dodson,” read the June 1, 2010, letter. “These aforementioned pistols will be used by Special Agent Dodson in furtherance of performance of his official duties.”

On orders, Dodson then sold the guns to known criminals, who first stashed them away and then -- deliberately unhindered by the ATF or any other agency -- whisked them off to Mexico.

People were killed with Fast and Furious weapons, including at least two American agents and hundreds of Mexicans. And the taxpayers picked up the bill.

So where’s the outrage?

There’s none from the feds. Attorney General Eric Holder has consistently stonewalled Rep. Darrell Issa, Sen. Chuck Grassley and other congressional investigators.

In a constantly evolving set of lies, Holder has denied knowing anything about Fast and Furious while at the same time withholding documents from the House and Senate committees looking into the mess while muzzling some witnesses and transferring others.

Justice calls the allegations about Dodson’s operation “false.” But Grassley says that’s “a lie,” as he told Greta van Susteren the other day. “The ATF ordered this ATF agent to purchase these guns and in turn sell them, and supposedly track them,” he said. “But he was a lone wolf in the operation -- they wouldn’t give him any help for 24-hour surveillance.”

So now the wheels have come off the official explanation for Fast and Furious. Of course, that explanation never made much sense in the first place.

For one thing, the ATF had no authority to track the guns once they were in Mexico; for another, nobody bothered to inform the Mexicans of this intrusion on their national sovereignty.

Further, we now know that a host of federal agencies (including the ATF, the FBI and IRS, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Drug Enforcement Administration and, very probably, top officials at the Department of Homeland Security) were all in the loop at various levels, as was the White House.

So calling “Fast and Furious” a cockamamie operation gone wrong just isn’t going to cut it anymore.

There are two possible explanations. The first is that the anti-gun Obama administration deliberately wanted American guns planted in Mexico in order to demonize American firearms dealers and gun owners. The operation was manufacturing “evidence” for the president’s false claim that we’re to blame for the appalling levels of Mexican drug-war violence.

If this is true, then Holder & Co. have got to go -- and the trail needs to be followed no matter where it leads. For the federal government to seek to frame its own citizens is unconscionable.

A second notion is that the CIA was behind the whole thing, which accounts for all the desperate wagon-circling. Under this theory, the Agency feared the los Zetas drug cartel was becoming too powerful and might even mount a coup against the Mexican government. So some 2,000 weapons costing more than $1.25 million were deliberately channeled to the rival Sinaloa cartel, which operates along the American border, to keep the Zetas in check.

Of course, there’s a third explanation -- that both scenarios are true, and that those in charge of Fast and Furious saw an opportunity to shoot two birds with one Romanian-made AK Draco pistol.

Time for a special prosecutor, who’s both fast and furious.

Michael Walsh’s new spy thriller, “Shock Warning,” hits stores this week.

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/furious_revelation_OhK6TBqPlEpRglHjsSbiBI#ixzz1ZNxoPatV
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Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #70 on: September 30, 2011, 08:00:28 »
Now, here, reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the Globe and Mail is a Canada/US border initiative I do support:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/americas/canada-us-border-patrolling-aircraft-hunt-bad-people-doing-bad-things/article2185795/
Quote
Canada-U.S. border-patrolling aircraft hunt ‘bad people doing bad things’

PAUL KORING
GRAND FORKS, N.D.— From Friday's Globe and Mail

Last updated Friday, Sep. 30, 2011

The unmanned planes look north toward the long, lightly defended and admittedly porous Canada-U.S. border – the best route many Americans believe for jihadists seeking to attack the United States to sneak across.

Like their missile-carrying military cousins prowling Pakistan’s skies targeting al-Qaeda suspects, the unarmed Predator aircraft that have patrolled the 49th parallel since 2009 are high-tech, sophisticated and little understood. And they are part of the same diffuse and determined effort the Unites States is making to secure its borders and defend itself.


he unmanned planes look north toward the long, lightly defended and admittedly porous Canada-U.S. border –
the best route many Americans believe for jihadists seeking to attack the United States to sneak across.
Like their missile-carrying military cousins prowling Pakistan’s skies targeting al-Qaeda suspects, the unarmed
Predator aircraft that have patrolled the 49th parallel since 2009 are high-tech, sophisticated and little
understood. And they are part of the same diffuse and determined effort the Unites States is making to
secure its borders and defend itself.


“We’re here to protect the nation from bad people doing bad things,” says John Priddy, U.S. National Air Security Operations director for the Customs and Border Protection’s Office of Air and Marine. He heads the Predator operation guarding American’s northern airspace.

“This is the equivalent of the Cold War in terms of a new type of vigilance,” says Mr. Priddy, who has flown everything from Boeing 747 cargo jets to Apache helicopters.

No one says “terrorism,” but no one has to. On Mr. Priddy’s office wall, there’s a fading photograph of the burned-out tail of a Pam Am Boeing 747 after it was blown up by Palestinian hijackers in Cairo in 1970. The pilot of that flight was his father, also named John Priddy.

Now, with a team of a few dozen, this John Priddy is running a futuristic – and slightly unsettling – surveillance system, a test program with only two planes operating in a relatively small zone that could grow into a fleet of unmanned aircraft watching the border day and night in all weather.

In an effort to demystify the unmanned aerial surveillance along 1,500 kilometres of the Canada-U.S. border, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security invited The Globe and Mail to visit its National Air Security Operations base in Grand Forks, N.D. There, a pair of Predators are prowling America’s northern frontier, providing protection without, the department insists, infringing on the privacy of Canadians on the other side of the border.

Eyes in the skies

On the ground, the Predator-B looks like a giant, ungainly carbon-fibre insect with a flattened hammerhead where a cockpit would usually be found. It sports a spindly undercarriage, long elegant wings and a propeller behind a V-shaped tail. Once aloft, it disappears, the sound of its single powerful engine fading even faster than the blue-grey fuselage melds with the sky. Within seconds it is gone, yet its powerful cameras and radar can peer down, beaming detailed surveillance images taken from many kilometres away.

To illustrate just how detailed and undetectable the Predators can be, Mr. Priddy described how staff watched a car stop briefly on one of the many rural roads that run parallel to the border. A handful of men got out, oblivious to the Predator circling perhaps five kilometres up. These men, like others before them, were Somalis, heading north, trying to sneak into Canada, Mr. Priddy said. The RCMP was alerted.

The full range of the planes’ capabilities is still being explored. Last spring, for instance, during the devastating floods along the Red and Souris rivers, the Predators provided real-time video of water-ravaged areas, and flew all the way up the Mississippi. Ice buildup threatening bridges showed clearly on the radar.

It feels a lot like Big Brother is watching. The data – video, radar and thermal imagery – streams back to control rooms and can be watched live or stored for later analysis. It can be delivered simultaneously to border patrol, police and other ground units, or put on the open Internet in the case of emergencies.

ut even with flights that can last for 10 hours, the Predators provide only an occasional presence over any one spot. It’s the unpredictability of where one could be, and the near impossibility to detect it even overhead, that provide its powerful deterrent value. That’s one of the reasons DHS wants it widely known that Predators are patrolling the borders.

‘Don’t call them drones’

Nothing irks the pilots who fly Predators and other unmanned aircraft more than having them dubbed “drones,” although the ubiquity of the term seems certain to prevail. “Drones” conjure up images of a mostly autonomous existence and these are anything but. The pilot just doesn’t sit inside.

“Call them UAVs – for unmanned aerial vehicle – or just Predators,” a pilot at Grand Forks pleads. Teams of two operate the Predators, with one piloting the aircraft by looking through its forward mounted camera. The other, a sensor operator, controls the turret beneath the nose that can focus camera or radar on objects or people many kilometres away and remain “locked on” even as the aircraft circles. Long flights can be flown by shifts of pilots from any properly equipped control centre with a satellite link.

Almost all the pilots have military backgrounds and long experience flying in very difficult conditions, but say that piloting the Predator is very demanding, made all the harder because the pilots have a very narrow field of vision and have none of the “seat of the pants” feelings of gravity and momentum that regular pilots rely upon. Imagine riding a bicycle while peering through opera glasses while sitting in a closet.

Old base, new war

No active military units remain at this vast air base outside Grand Forks, only the ghosts of another war: a mammoth B-52 Stratofortress bomber and a phallic Minuteman ballistic missile guard the gate, proclaiming “Warriors of the North.”

The Predators are the only aircraft currently stationed here. The two planes, one at a time, patrol from Muskeg Bay, in the Lake of the Woods area on the Ontario-Minnesota border, to roughly 1,500 kilometres west beyond Spokane, Wash., and from the 49th parallel to 160 kilometres south. That’s 246,000 square kilometres to roam, or roughly the airspace over Britain.

In the busy operations centre, there is a keen awareness that Canadians – who throng Grand Forks on weekends for everything from hockey tournaments to shopping sprees – regard the Predators with a mix of trepidation and resentment. “We work closely with our counterparts on the Canadian side,” Mr. Priddy says, aware of the need to reassure Canadians that unmanned planes patrolling the border are meant to protect the United States, not invade Canadian privacy.


U.S. Customs and Border Patrol has used these unmanned aircraft to monitor the 49th parallel since 2009.
Paul Koring/The Globe and Mail


I fully support this idea and I believe Canada should approach the US and offer to co-fund, co-man and co-operate this system to patrol both sides of the border and provide information/targeting to law enforcement on both sides of the border. If the US border is insecure and vulnerable then so is ours.
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline GAP

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #71 on: September 30, 2011, 08:03:51 »
I agree.....rif-raf goes both ways, as do others...
Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I´m not so sure about the universe

Offline cupper

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #72 on: October 01, 2011, 22:56:38 »
You don't need that much: In my younger days around the farm, we use to be able to string about 500 feet of cow fence ad day with just three of us and a tractor. That's a mile every two weeks. 6,400 Km = 4,000 miles, so divide by  23 times two work weeks in a year (we're giving ourselves four weeks vacation) and basically, 175 teams of three can do the job.

OOPS! I missed the last sentence: It's going to be done by unionized personnel. Forget I talked.

By the way ERC, how did you get hold of Napoloitano's official Homeland Security picture ???

Don't forget, this will also be a government project, so there will be a 10,000% mark-up, and additional administrative costs.

This is the same goverment whose justice department spent $16 per person for muffins at a conference for employees to eat along with their $3 per ounce coffees (and no not Starbucks).
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

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Offline cupper

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #73 on: October 01, 2011, 22:59:23 »
Apparently Rick Perry would consider sending troops into Mexico to help quell the drug violence.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/perry-send-us-troops-to-mexico-to-fight-drug-wars/2011/10/01/gIQA2qDGDL_story.html
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

There is no God, and life is just a myth.

"He who drinks, sleeps. He who sleeps, does not sin. He who does not sin, is holy. Therefore he who drinks, is holy."

Let's Go CAPS!

Offline canada94

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Re: Mexico Drug War and Instability
« Reply #74 on: October 01, 2011, 23:10:21 »
Apparently Rick Perry would consider sending troops into Mexico to help quell the drug violence.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/perry-send-us-troops-to-mexico-to-fight-drug-wars/2011/10/01/gIQA2qDGDL_story.html

Why not! They can print more money to pay for more things they can't afford :)

Great idea!