Author Topic: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress  (Read 7773 times)

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Offline Vell

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Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« on: November 06, 2013, 01:54:45 »
I have been browsing these forums for information for the past few months but today is the first day the search function on both this site and google have failed me, so this is my first post.

I applied to the CF last month and began training (since I was out of shape) shortly before that. I have made a lot of progress since I began training about 6 weeks ago, but I have unfortunately caught the flu. My whole body aches and I have a fever. Any research I do says that while I have any symptoms below the neck (body pain, sore stomach, fever, breathing problems...) I should not do any exercise at all.

My fever is gone now. I am still sick but apparently I should be OK to do SOME training. My question then becomes, how much do I need to workout to simply not lose progress. To be more precise, while I am sick, I have no interest in improving my progress, but I want to do enough training to not lose any of the progress I have already made in the past 6 weeks.

I jog for 30 minutes every second day and do push-ups, sit-ups, squats, and planks (of varying styles) on days where I do not run.
I have made the following progress in the past 6 weeks (yes, I know, it is pathetic, but it is still progress).

  • 0.3km jogging until too tired to go on -> 2.5km jogging before getting too tired to go on. (using couch to 5k programme) End goal: at least 5km in 20minutes.
  • 4 consecutive push-ups -> 16 consecutive push-ups (I wish this would progress faster). End goal: at least 30 consecutive push-ups.
  • 20 consecutive sit-ups -> 50 consecutive sit-ups. End goal: Already met, the rest is gravy.

Offline PMedMoe

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2013, 07:19:42 »
You're sick.  Your time would be better spent recovering fully from your illness instead of worrying about losing some progress on your road to fitness.  You say you applied a month ago.  Given some of the recruiting examples here, I think you have plenty of time to get in shape.
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
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Offline Nudibranch

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2013, 14:14:45 »
You're sick.  Your time would be better spent recovering fully from your illness instead of worrying about losing some progress on your road to fitness.  You say you applied a month ago.  Given some of the recruiting examples here, I think you have plenty of time to get in shape.

This.
That said, if you really want to exercise, I do some light running if I'm just mildly ill, and I listen to my body. Sometimes the exercise makes me feel better. If it makes me feel worse, I quit and let my body recover some more.

Offline Vell

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2013, 19:05:20 »
Thank you for the feedback. I ended up just doing a 3km speed walk and my body did not seem to complain any more than it already was. I tried a little light jogging but that was hurting way more than it should so I returned to the speed walking. I don't know how much 'exercise' speed walking provides, but it was all I could do at the time.

I still have not been able to find any webpages that list the approximate bare minimum of physical activity required to prevent the degradation of one's fitness level, but I am sure the information is out there and I am just not searching for the right terms. I would still like this information not only for when I am sick, but also for days where I have much less time available to me to exercise.

Offline X_para76

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2013, 21:58:44 »
I would suggest that until you've recovered fully from your illness that you steer clear of cardio. Doing cardio has a tendency to depress your immune system, and because of that I'd stick to doing calisthenics.  This will allow your immune system to recover and also help to give your metabolism a boost.
"In the absence of orders, find something and kill it." Field Marshal Erwin Rommel

Offline Chernoble

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2013, 14:17:50 »
If you maintain your nutrition it will ensure the maintenance of your progress and also give the right fuel for your body to get better :)
"Always fight, always win! The only unfair fight is the one you lose!"

Offline Vell

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2014, 21:57:04 »
Ha ha, 9 months and I still have not even written my CFAT (7 years in Japan is not kind on the application process). At least it has given me more than ample time to train. Now I am up to 6-7km in 30 minutes, no resting, and 30 consecutive push-ups (the push-up training is not improving so quickly at all, but at least I am at my goal... but I still want to improve). I can run no problem when I have a cold now as long as I have no symptoms below the neck (chills, fever and aches are a no go for running, but nose and throat problems are fine).

Now the big challenge is running in Japan's summer 30-35 degrees plus temperatures in humidity often above 80%. It can be brutal.

Offline Emilio

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2014, 01:27:40 »
Ha ha, 9 months and I still have not even written my CFAT (7 years in Japan is not kind on the application process). At least it has given me more than ample time to train. Now I am up to 6-7km in 30 minutes, no resting, and 30 consecutive push-ups (the push-up training is not improving so quickly at all, but at least I am at my goal... but I still want to improve). I can run no problem when I have a cold now as long as I have no symptoms below the neck (chills, fever and aches are a no go for running, but nose and throat problems are fine).

Now the big challenge is running in Japan's summer 30-35 degrees plus temperatures in humidity often above 80%. It can be brutal.

7k in thirty minutes! Jesus that's really good, Keep it up.
"Nobody's right if everybody's wrong"

Offline Vell

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2014, 02:45:59 »
Actually, the 7km days are likely closer to 35 minutes. I make three laps of a 2km course in close to 30 minutes but sometimes go over in time and distance. If it is THAT good, I am likely mistaken. Either way, it is a far cry from my original 300 meters and then being winded. I run for about 30 minutes every second day since September 2013 (not including warmup/stretching/cool down). I really need to take my smartphone with me again and record my distance and time precisely to see how far I have come. Some days my runs go great and I feel like I can keep going after three laps, other days I feel dizzy after just 4km (especially if I run in direct sunlight in 30+ Celsius weather and 80%+ humidity).
« Last Edit: June 30, 2014, 02:52:15 by Vell »

Offline Vell

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Re: Exercising and the Flu: How to Not Lose Progress
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2014, 01:35:56 »
After properly recording my time and pace with a GPS, I found that it takes me 33 minutes to do 7km at my best, but often closer to 35 minutes.

Colds are not longer my biggest enemy however. Japan's summer 35-40 degree Celsius and 80% plus humidity are. I can't even finish my runs if I try to do it in the full force of the afternoon sun.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 01:38:59 by Vell »