Author Topic: NEW AGE DIETING. (for those slightly out of shape)  (Read 18140 times)

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Offline Nemo888

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Re: NEW AGE DIETING. (for those slightly out of shape)
« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2014, 18:26:51 »
I have been paleo on and off for two years as well. I tried bringing things back a few at a time. Dairy is fine for me. Legumes I can do a few days a week, but grains make me feel like crap and give me tummy problems. It was definitely worth trying. Counting calories seems like a waste of time.  Not eating processed foods is so much more important. If I eat too much crap I don't even feel like working out sometimes. Having a few extra pounds while being in good shape is healthier than these 8% body fat glass cannons I see at the gym.


Offline Traintosucceed

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Re: NEW AGE DIETING. (for those slightly out of shape)
« Reply #26 on: April 02, 2014, 18:29:12 »
What I do for dieting and what works works for me, so take it for whatever you think it's worth.

I was having problems with malabsorption and stomach/pelvic pain and problems for over two years.  I went to the doctor numerous times and this latest visit I saw a new doctor who put me on the paleo diet.  I have been doing it since January and have seen a marked improvement in my health.

I went from 195lbs down to 178lbs in that timeframe and a lot of pain and problems I was having are slowly starting to resolve themselves.  Combining this with a healthy dose of exercise, while not a 100% better I feel a lot better then I have in awhile.

So what do I eat:

Lean Meat every meal (Fish, Chicken, Beef, Turkey)
Vegetables (Except Potatoes and Corn)
Fruits
Nuts (Almonds, Cashews, Walnuts, Pecans, etc...)

What don't I eat:

Any Dairy (No Milk, Cheese, Yogurt, Butter)
No Grains (Bread, Rice, Oatmeal, Quinoa, Couscous etc)
No Legumes (Beans, Peanuts, etc)

My meals are usually something like this:

Breakfast:

4 Eggs
Sliced Apple
Raspberries & Strawberries
Maybe some vegetables

Lunch:

Meat/Fish Choice
Mashed Sweet Potatoes or salad or something
Broccoli/Carrots/Cauliflower etc...

Dinner:

Meat/Fish Choice
Some sort of steamed vegetable
Some sort of salad

What do I drink:

Water
Almond Milk
Smoothies
Freshly squeezed juice (No concentrate)

I only cook with Olive Oil/Coconut Oil and I usually use some sort of seasoning with anything I cook to add flavor.

I DON'T CALORIE COUNT

This diet I am on is not a calorie counting diet.  You would not believe the amount of food that I eat.  When I say I am having chicken for lunch, I usually eat half a whole roasted chicken.  If you choose to follow a diet like I do, eat as much as you want but make the right choices with what you ingest into your body i.e. lean meat, vegetables, fruit and nuts along with plenty of water and nothing more.

At first this diet sucked, I was craving starch and had massive withdrawals for about two weeks from my body craving the sugars from grains and dairy.  Once my body acclimatized it started to get easy.  I actually think the hardest part was not eating bread and not drinking alcohol.  I still drink a little bit but try and limit myself to one or two beers or glasses of wine a week and have been adhering to this for awhile now so it gets easier.

I occasionally break my meal cycle as I travel a lot for work but try to limit myself to two to three cheat meals per week and so far I have been able to maintain that. 


As for PT:

I run 3x a week for an hour each time
I swim twice a week for an hour
I do pushups and situps every night before bed
I stretch/foam roll every morning
I have a chin up bar in door of my kitchen and usually do 30 to 50 chinups/pullups every other day.

Something else I have also done at work which has gotten a lot of wierd looks from people has been converting to a standing desk.  I found a standing desk at work that nobody was using (it's electronic and can go up and down) and took it to my office and use it now.  I was having back pains but they are now virtually gone.  It's also a great core workout standing up at the office and I find I am more productive as a result.

For those looking to join the military, you need to know that your fitness will be like a radio wave throughout your career.  You are going to be at an operational unit and be afforded time for PT everyday, other times you may be in a staff job or travelling a lot and time for PT will become more scarce.  At my infantry battalion I was lifting heavy weights everyday, doing tonnes of circuit training and had all sorts of equipment at my disposal.

In my present job I spend 20 days a month in hotels and probably am at the airport flying 8 to 10 days a month.  Obviously I cannot train the way I did before so you need to be able to change it up. 

What is critically important to you though is that you start your career fit.  We change so much and the organization moves so quickly that if you don't start your career in shape and healthy, well unfortunately you will probably never be in shape or healthy.  With this in mind, take the time to adequately prepare yourself before you come and this will set the proper conditions for future success in your career.

If you have questions, PM me.

Awesome contribution, I love hearing the success stories of others. This is why I made this topic. So people can get the help they need and find what works for them.  I've heard alot of great things about the Paleo lifestyle and even tried it myself, but had to give it up because my local grocer wasn't reliable enough. Living in a remote rural community certainly has its downfalls.
Recruiting Centre: ST. John's, NL
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Trade choice 1:Aircraft Structures Technician
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Applied: Jan 2013
First contact: April 2013
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Medical: April 17th, 2013
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BMQ: June 2nd, 2014

Offline Bigguy85

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Re: NEW AGE DIETING. (for those slightly out of shape)
« Reply #27 on: April 12, 2014, 09:09:36 »
Everyday there are more and more advances being made in the dieting and nutrition field, some good and some bad. Due to inclement weather conditions that have me house bound for the day I feel it is necessary to take this time and provide the people of this forum with the new age way of FITNESS dieting. I say FITNESS dieting because that is exactly the image I have for the Canadian Forces and its people, the fitness elite of our great country, because lets face it, the Canada's guide to nutrition isn't exactly updated on a regular basis (if you all remember those charts we seen in school, they have pretty much remained the same over the years). So without further ado, lets get on with the show!

The following will allow you to calculate the number of calories you burn daily based on you activity level. Its is broken into 2 steps. The first step is your BMR (basal metabolic rate), this is the number of calories you burn daily doing no activity whatsoever. The method shown here is the Harris-Benedict Formula. The second step uses your BMR along with constants based on your daily activity level to calculate your TDEE (total daily energy expenditure).

Step 1
Calculate your BMR (basal metabolic rate):

Men: BMR = 66 + (13.7 x weight in kg) + (5 x height in cm) - (6.8 x age in years)

Women: BMR = 655 + (9.6 x weight in kg) + (1.8 x height in cm) - (4.7 x age in years)

Remember 1 inch = 2.54cm and 2.2 lbs = 1 kg.

Step 2
Calculate your TDEE (total daily energy expenditure). This will tell you the average number of calories you burn based on your BMR and your daily activity level.

Sedentary = BMR X 1.2 (little or no exercise and a desk or still standing job)
Lightly active = BMR X 1.375 (light exercise or sports one to three times per week)
Moderately active = BMR X 1.55 (moderate exercise or sports three to five times per week)
Very active = BMR X 1.725 (hard exercise or sports six to seven times per week)
Extremely active = BMR X 1.9 (hard daily exercise or sports and a physical job, or twice a day training for an athletic event such as for a marathon or intense competition)

So the figure you come up with will be the average number of calories you burn daily. This number is crucial so you can adjust caloric intake in order to bulk (add mass) or cut (reduce body-fat) or even to maintain if that is your goal. Remember this will only be as accurate as the data you put in as well as how honestly you assess your daily activity level.

How many meals per day should I eat?

This is a highly debated topic in the fitness community. Some people can eat 1 large meal/day and get great results. Some fast for several hours/day, then go through a feeding phase. For the purpose of this article, stick with the generally accepted standard of 6 to 8 smaller meals per day. I try and keep my meals about 3 hours apart. If you can only do 2 hours apart, do it.

How many calories should I eat?

So your TDEE is 2500. You know that if you eat 2500 calories per day, you should maintain your weight. You also know that dropping calories too low is a terrible idea. So, what is the answer? The fact is, there is no set answer as we are all different. However, the general rule of thumb is to start with a deficit of 300-500 calories. You will need to monitor yourself closely and continue to adjust until you hit your 'sweet spot' (you'll know when you do). In my example, I'm going with a 500 calorie deficit, so daily intake will be 2000 calories per day.

I've figured out my TDEE, but have no idea how much protein, carbohydrates, and fats I should eat to reach that number?!

For the sample diet, we're going with a TDEE of 2500 calories, with a 500 calorie deficit.  The diet will be 2000 calories a day. There are countless macro percentage splits (macros = macro nutrients, the stuff that makes up your food, i.e. protein, carbohydrates, and fats), but a widely accepted starting point is 40% protein, 40% carbohydrates, and 20% fats, shortened to 40/40/20. So 40% of 2000 calories = 800 calories (2000 x .40 = 800). That means 800 of your calories will come from protein, and 800 will come from carbohydrates. 20% of 2000 = 400. 400 of your calories will come from fats. Protein and carbohydrates each contain 4 calories per gram, and fats contain 9 calories per gram, therefore this diet will consist of 200g protein, 200g carbohydrates, and 45g fat.

From this point, you can play with the numbers a bit to your liking. You may want to adjust slightly to make it 250g protein, 150g carbohydrates, and 45g of fat. In so doing, the total of 2000 calories hasn't changed, only the macro split has.

I don't know how I should combine my proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. What should I eat, and when?

Great question! Now you know you'll be eating 2000 calories/day, at 40/40/20, then modified a bit to bring us to 250g protein, 150g carbohydrates, and 45g fat. In our example diet, we will break this down across 6 meals, spaced 3 hours apart.

There are plenty of opinions on when to eat what, but one that I think everybody will agree on is to have a protein source in every meal. To make our sample diet easy to follow, I am going to break our 250g protein down evenly across our 6 meals.  Remember, this is just a sample. So 250g protein / 6 meals = roughly 40g protein per meal. When the fat macro is relatively low like in our example, I would do the same - break it down evenly across all meals. So 45g fat / 6 meals = 7.5g fat per meal. That leaves us with carbohydrates.

On a diet where cutting bodyfat is the primary goal,  Keep carbohydrates focused around your high energy activity, namely, your workout. Pre and Post workout is an ideal time to consume the majority of your carbohydrates. Your first meal of the day is also a great time for carbohydrates for other reasons. The sample will have carbohydrates in meals 1, pre, and post workout. 3 meals - i.e. 150g / 3 meals = 50g carbohydrates per meal.

Even if this information helps one person I have achieved what I set out to do. I hope I posted it in the right area of the forum! I'd like to thank everyone for their time!
 
PS. use your head, clean foods only. You wouldn't lose the excess weight your carrying eating Oreo's and BBQ chips.

This is a compilation of data I've gathered over the span of a 2 year period from various fitness professionals that I am unable to list. I in no way take credit for the information contained, I merely put it all together in this thread for you!



Hey Everyone, thank you for taking the time in advance for the answers,
I am having difficulty working out how much calories i should be taking in to loose weight.
I am currently training to enter full time as a med tech,
I train in jujitsu 5 days a week for 1.5 hours a session followed by 1.5 hours of MMA,
I have drastically cut out a lot of negatives, sugar, bread, dairy, coffee, high fructose, I am obese by the BMI index standards but wont give up.

I currently weigh 318 lbs, 6Ft 1 inch and am 29 years old.

Any wisdom would be greatly appreciated, also as a second question would you be able to recommend a good protein powder for post workouts.


Thank you all again.

Offline Nemo888

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Re: NEW AGE DIETING. (for those slightly out of shape)
« Reply #28 on: April 12, 2014, 10:07:51 »
If I want to blow off some pounds what I eat is more important than how much. I've lost about 45 pounds of fat during my injury recovery. The thing I discovered was ketosis. You can waste thousand paying for the Dr Bernstien diet which is exactly this. You pancreas is not designed to process large amounts of carbs  in short periods. A 16 ounce soft drink is the equivalent of digesting all the sugar in 8 feet of sugar cane. Humans and their ancestors never had access to so much sugar and weight gain is the bodies protective reaction to so much acidic sugar being released into your bloodstream. Your insulin spikes to store the acidic sugar as fat and then crashes at which time you have serious sugar cravings that sustain the unhealthy cycle. Once you do this for awhile your body gets accustomed to a constant stream of carbs and forgets how to produce fuel from fat.

This process is called ketosis. It replaces glucose by producing  ketones from fat, one of which is acetone. I experimented at first with keto sticks until there was enough ketones in my urine to turn the stick pink. By then you could smell the acetone and the sticks weren't really necessary. It was very easy to get rid of the ten pounds I had gained during Christmas holidays two years ago. After the fresh fat was gone the old weight was hard to get at and I got super grouchy.  I had to not be so severe. But my liver had relearned how to go into keotsis. Now when I want to lose weight I limit carbs to under 150 grams a day and occasionally skip meals. The crash starts and about 20 minutes later I bounce back and the ketosis starts. I can lose about 3-4 pounds of fat a month whenever I want now. I'm down to 15% body fat and don't really worry about it anymore. Since December I put on just over ten pounds of lean mass and can happily eat another 83 calories a day just to maintain my basic metabolic rate. Access to a Tanita body fat % scale is pretty useful in measuring your progress. I thought I was getting fat again, but it was muscle. My BMI is obese again too, but I have 45 pounds less fat then the last time I had a BMI of 30. I never counted calories but will admit I counted carbs for a few months.

I buy the fancy Kaizen Isolate at Costco. Costco has the best prices I could find. I also get the Premier Protein drink juice boxes for right after my workouts and Clif protein bars. I've really bulked up in just muscle since I upped the protein to about 140 grams a day. I'm trying to get to the ideal gram of protein per pound of lean  per day.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2014, 10:38:35 by Nemo888 »

Offline Jayrickson

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Re: NEW AGE DIETING. (for those slightly out of shape)
« Reply #29 on: April 12, 2014, 23:01:28 »


Hey Everyone, thank you for taking the time in advance for the answers,
I am having difficulty working out how much calories i should be taking in to loose weight.
I am currently training to enter full time as a med tech,
I train in jujitsu 5 days a week for 1.5 hours a session followed by 1.5 hours of MMA,
I have drastically cut out a lot of negatives, sugar, bread, dairy, coffee, high fructose, I am obese by the BMI index standards but wont give up.

I currently weigh 318 lbs, 6Ft 1 inch and am 29 years old.

Any wisdom would be greatly appreciated, also as a second question would you be able to recommend a good protein powder for post workouts.


Thank you all again.

Call me crazy, but I think protein powders are a crock. I put on weight taking them.
I don't want to give bad advice, but I will tell you what worked for me personally, under the advice of a professional trainer.

Keto diet starting at 2k cal a day. Adjust based on how you feel day to day. I usually eat less than 2k because I am just not hungry.
Taking 5-10g Creatine daily. I feel like it's working. My muscles are definitely larger.
12.5g BCAA (MonsterAmino) daily pre/during/post workout. 1 dose, 0 calories, I sip it over 2.5 hrs.
I thought i'd put on weight with the creatine but it's coming off like a bad thing. 10-11 hours of hard cardio and weights a week too, plus 7-14 hours of walking a week, and a bit of biking.

Again, its not advice, its what worked for me.
I've had bad advice since January up until March and I'm way behind my goal, so consult a professional.

And to Nemo, keto is amazing. Ive shed 15 pounds in just over 2 weeks now, and kept + gained muscle.
I love the results but the food sucks.
BMQ: April 28, 2014

Offline Wes-Ken

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Re: NEW AGE DIETING. (for those slightly out of shape)
« Reply #30 on: July 05, 2014, 00:21:19 »
A keto diet and 10-11 hours of hard cardio a week.  Yep that will work for a time as you COMPLETELY destroy your cortisol/testosterone/estrogen levels.  That is the worst advice I have ever heard and am shocked people still push crap like that...fire your trainer immediately.  The reason he gave you that advice is because he knows it will work for the short term.  "Wow, amazing results, this guy  must be good".  Meanwhile, under the hood your endocrine system is smashing it's head into the wall.  Google "adrenal fatigue" please.

You havent had bad advice from January to March, you've had bad advice from January to April.... 

Jayrickson, do not, for the love of god (or lack thereof) follow this kind of training plan, unless you want to end up in the hospital.