Author Topic: Work Partners  (Read 6552 times)

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Online mariomike

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Work Partners
« on: November 21, 2015, 20:23:44 »
Having a steady* partner was, and still is, a common theme in TV shows such as Adam-12, Emergency! and Third Watch.

Of course, that's Hollywood.

The department I worked for always had a "steady partner policy". Some partnerships last over a quarter century.

I wonder how common that policy is in other emergency services? It was just something we took for granted.

* Your steady partner is who you work with on a permanent basis. Your swing partners are those you work with occasionally when your steady partner is off -- sick or injured etc.






Offline Brihard

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2015, 21:38:11 »
Must be nice. We're one member to a car unless we specifically double up for a particular reason or because too many of our cruisers are broken...
Pacificsm is doctrine fostered by a delusional minority and by the media, which holds forth the proposition it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

Online mariomike

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2015, 21:51:18 »
Must be nice. We're one member to a car unless we specifically double up for a particular reason or because too many of our cruisers are broken...

It wasn't given to them.

In 1974, the arbitrator ruled in favour of the Metro Police Association on the two-man car issue.
In 1976, they went on a slowdown over it.
https://www.tpa.ca/about-us/history/

"It took me 10 years to get two men in a car in Metro. We had guys beaten up, stabbed and murdered when they were one in a car."
Sid Brown, President Metro Police Association
Toronto Star, December 20, 1976
« Last Edit: November 21, 2015, 21:54:51 by mariomike »

Offline Teager

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2015, 21:20:53 »
Not being an emergency member myself but my dad is a retired OPP officer. Outside of major cities I don't think there are many partners other than Paramedic services. I believe most firefighters and police officers depend on there shift mates for help and back up. I believe the same bonds are made as partners within those shifts.

Offline JesseWZ

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2015, 22:33:35 »
Must be nice. We're one member to a car unless we specifically double up for a particular reason or because too many of our cruisers are broken...

Same here.
I will be seen and not heard... I will be seen and not heard... I will be seen and not heard...

Online mariomike

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2015, 09:51:51 »
^ In the 1970's, the Metro Police Services Board challenged the two-officer car arbitration all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada and lost. ^

The rule still stands.

Outside of major cities I don't think there are many partners other than Paramedic services. I believe most firefighters and police officers depend on there shift mates for help and back up. I believe the same bonds are made as partners within those shifts.

Of course you bond with the members on your platoon. You  "marry up" with them occasionally when your steady partner is off sick or injured.
The bond you share with your partner is different. When you ride with the same partner every shift for years and years, it's not going to be the same as the bond you have with the others in a platoon.

When others want to know about someone, they ask their partner. If it's a good partnership, like a good marriage, they share no secrets with others.

In the fire service, rather than the dynamics of a 50-50 equal partnership, crews number about five members, and always includes a Captain.












« Last Edit: November 24, 2015, 08:18:36 by mariomike »

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2016, 20:20:57 »
Although few may remember it, "Car 54" ( an NYPD Plymouth Belvedere )  is on Youtube. It ( the TV series ) was funny, in my opinion.

There was an episode called, "Change Your Partners".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgXIfOB_mZo

Francis and Gunther's nine blissful years as partners in the Bronx stuns an NYPD personnel officer because the average partnership lasts only 16 months  before they are begging for a partner change. ( We used to call it a 4-way switch. If all four did not sign the transfer agreement, it meant all four were stuck with each other. Like many marriages, you had to make it work.  :) )
I think anyone who ever served in a department with permanent partners would find it funny. 
Where I worked, we had a few pairs who were together over a quarter of a century. 

When you want someone as your permanent partner, there has to be some sort of a bond between you even before you start working together. Even if you have only just met for the first time.

We also had permanent stations. Your station could be in Etobicoke, North York, Scarborough, York, East York, or City. Back then, each of the six had their own mayors.

The schedules were also permanent. At first, I started on a permanent rotating schedule. Then, with seniority, I bid for a permanent fixed schedule. 0700-1900 Monday to Friday.
Because the shifts were 12-hours, you worked 5-days the first week, 3-days the second week, and 2-days the third week.

Toronto Police work a 10-hour day shift, a 10-hour evening shift and an 8-hour night shift. Firefighters work 24-hour shifts ( they used to work a 10-hour day and 14-hour night ) and Paramedics work 12-hour shifts.

At least in municipal 9-1-1, the way they did it was good for morale, in my opinion. Your partner is the one you turn to for advice and reassurance, in both your professional and personal lives.

So, life was pretty simple. Get the rubber on the road / "wheels rolling" within 90-seconds of the tones going off. Don't worry about the rest.  :)



« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 13:33:48 by mariomike »

Online mariomike

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2016, 12:55:42 »
Quote
I found it in Stats Can.  Sexual harassment in workplace; 4% in Quebec raising to a high of 7% in Ontario.  Sexual assault in workplace; 1% nationally raising to 6% for a life time employee; includes all touching, actual penetration is 1%. 

Saw those stats posted today in another thread.

Perhaps my reply is more appropriate here.

It wasn't a topic of discussion when I started with the City. The stations were all male domains. Not to suggest that was right or wrong - just the way it was.

When women were eventually integrated into the Department, their presence in the stations sparked an angry response from some of the wives.
There were no separate bedrooms - the Department's solution to that problem was simple: remove the beds.
Eventually, they got around to building separate washrooms and showers. The old stations were tiny and primitive by today's standards.

You were a 50-50 partnership that lasted for years. Sometimes, even a couple of decades. Neither one of you was boss of the other.
That included 1900-0700 HR shifts, with no other crew or Supervisor in the station.
Removing the sexual aspect, it had some similarity to marriage. ie: You had to work things out between the two of you, or get a divorce.

Perhaps surprisingly, I didn't hear of many Sexual Harassment complaints. Or, maybe they were quietly dealt with by transferring one or both of them.
More often, I heard, and personally felt, exactly the opposite. Regardless of gender etc., people were loyal to their partners.

For those few who didn't get with the program, there was always The Big Threat. Termination of employment. And they made it stick!

 



« Last Edit: July 28, 2016, 13:39:32 by mariomike »

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2016, 15:35:40 »
Anyone wondering what it is like to ride 40-hours a week, year after year, with the same partner may find this amusing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A7OKurRoII

The Department finds the average partnership lasts only 16 months and 3 days before the pair are screaming for a change.

"He keeps opening and closing the glove compartment a thousand times a day! Click, click, CLICK!"

"He's a foot tapper! Tap, tap, TAP!"



Online mariomike

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2017, 08:37:59 »
Quote
Just consider how many of the public service is off on "stress" leave at any given time. It's a universal issue that is hitting our government work force and as most here say, it creates a problem in distinguishing those who have a genuine condition caused by overwhelming external factors from those who are just psychologically weak by nature and have coping problems in the face of minor or moderate situations that most of us can handle.

Saw this in Radio Chatter. Thought it better to reply here.

Ontario passed PTSD presumptive legislation for police officers, firefighters, paramedics less than one year ago.

At a luncheon a few weeks ago it was mentioned that since then, PTSD claims have "taken off like wildfire".

Members claiming PTSD have to be temporarily ( or permanently ) removed from 9-1-1 operations.

There seems to be a concern at the top that if an honourable path exists to escape 9-1-1 operations that many will take it.

I have read here about marijuana and dogs ( $30,000 ? ) to treat PTSD.

I wouldn't know about that. But, I would say that having a partner you get along with makes the job fun.  :)





 
« Last Edit: February 23, 2017, 10:32:12 by mariomike »

Online mariomike

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Re: Work Partners
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2017, 22:30:53 »
How not to make a good first impression at your station,

City of Detroit Probationary Firefighter decided to bring a watermelon wrapped in a pink ribbon to the station. He was fired.

As a probie, the union will send a rep to hold his hand at the dismissal. But, that's it. He is history.

"After a thorough investigation, it was determined that the best course of action was to terminate the employment of this probationary employee."
http://www.fox2detroit.com/news/local-news/detroit-firefighter-fired-for-bringing-watermelon-to-station

I brought a cake my first day on the job.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2017, 22:41:34 by mariomike »