Author Topic: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"  (Read 48271 times)

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #50 on: October 25, 2017, 21:41:12 »
C'mon man! #200M per year to keep old vessels afloat, nothing for new ships:

Quote
Liberals promise new funds for cash-strapped coast guard, fisheries department
'Operating aging vessels is challenging, as older ships break down more frequently and cost more to repair'

The Trudeau government has promised an infusion of much-needed cash for the Canadian Coast Guard and federal Fisheries Department, which documents show have suffered from years of chronic underfunding.

The question is whether the new funding will be enough.

The new money was included in the federal fiscal update, which the Liberals released to much fanfare on Tuesday, and works out to more than $1.2 billion over the next six years.

The government says the funds will be used in a variety of ways, including maintenance to keep the Coast Guard's aging ships, navigational aids and communications equipment in working order.

Money will also be used to train new staff, monitor fish stocks, upgrade radio and information networks and for icebreaking services.

The new funds will no doubt be welcomed by coast guard and fisheries officials, who warned Fisheries Minister Dominic Leblanc when he took over the portfolio last year that they were struggling to make ends meet.

But University of Calgary professor Rob Huebert, who has worked closely with the coast guard, said the promised new cash represents a fraction of what is really needed.

"Good on them for helping on the operational side," he said. "But $200 million per year? Come on  [emphasis added]."

Demands exceeding Coast Guard budget

Briefing notes prepared for Leblanc and obtained by The Canadian Press show the toll has been particularly heavy on the coast guard, whose job is to protect Canada's waterways and keep them safe and open to trade.

The agency relies on a fleet of 116 ships and 22 helicopters as well as 17,000 navigational aids and a network of 300 radio towers across Canada to accomplish this task.

But the briefing notes say that the demands placed on the coast guard had exceeded its $1.1-billion budget, which had forced officials to start making trade offs.

"For several years," officials wrote, "CCG has been attempting to protect these services from reductions by reallocating funds from maintenance."

The decision to divert money away from maintenance isn't insignificant given the age of the coast guard's fleet, with many of its ships more than 30 years old and some approaching 50 [emphasis added].

"Operating aging vessels is challenging, as older ships break down more frequently and cost more to repair," Leblanc was told. "In 2013-14, 1,595 operational days were lost due to breakdowns."
Financial challenges

The government is working to replace some of those ships as part of its national shipbuilding strategy, starting with the delivery of a new offshore fisheries science vessel early next year.

But the entire strategy has been marred by delays and cost overruns, which has forced the government to look for stop-gaps such as refitting extremely old ships or, when that won't work, leasing privately owned vessels.

In the meantime, government officials have said they are reviewing both the construction schedules and budgets of the new vessels.

The coast guard's overall financial situation was considered so severe last year that the government quietly ordered a review of its real financial risks and requirements, though it's unclear where that review sits...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/liberals-fiscal-update-coast-guard-1.4372059

Sunny ways for CCG and CAF, eh Justin?  Heck, these are just core federal responsibilities but you'd rather bribe people with their descendants' money for votes (if not their own if the crunch comes sooner).

Hurl.

To repeat what it's all about, from 2016:

Quote
Canadian Coast Guard Going Down
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/04/05/mark-collins-canadian-coast-guard-going-down/

Mark
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« Last Edit: October 25, 2017, 21:47:27 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #51 on: October 26, 2017, 07:41:53 »
Did we give that $241 million to the Clinton Foundation yet?  Seems like the CCG could use it more.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2017, 09:23:37 by Jarnhamar »
There are no wolves on Fenris

Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #52 on: October 26, 2017, 10:15:17 »
Mind you the CCG fleet is young compared to the USCG.

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #53 on: October 26, 2017, 11:32:41 »
Generally buoy work done over the side rather than the rear, plus her draft is a good 10' more than a 1100, buoy work often means being close in to hazards. She be good at deep sea ODAS's

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tB6XfEfwJHE

The draft would be the only issue.

Bouy deployment and recovery is regularly done by off shore supply vessels of similar design, wave rider weather bouys are regularly launched and recovered in the fields off Newfoundland and Nova Scotia.

If you've got rail cranes or a crane at the stern, then doing it over the stern is ideal, in most supply vessels, the stern is specifically designed for running chain,.

The CCGS Grenfel is regularly employed in a supplementary role as a bouy tender, her cranes are pedestal boom cranes, fixed in position just aft of the superstructure, I've never been on her for bouy tending, but I would assume they'd flake the chain on deck and run it out from the "rescue zone", mid ship.

The CCGS Terry Fox also lays the occasional bouy.

Practically speaking, most of the "smaller" bouys are laid from the work barges anyway, even some of the larger ones are as well, depending on the area.

The Aiviq would be a poor dedicated bouy tender, but if she had a work barge, she'd certainly be able to fill in here and there, and in fairness, it's not a lack bouy tenders that's the coast guards primary concern, it's a lack of ice breakers.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2017, 11:40:18 by Not a Sig Op »
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #54 on: October 26, 2017, 11:46:27 »
One thing I have noted over the years is that the West Coast and East Coast CCG do everything differently and both will tell you that the other is wrong. :)


edit: I only did one deep sea ODAS deployment. Basically the workboat towed the buoy away from the ship, with the anchor over the side on a quick release. Once all the mooring line was payed out, the anchor was released and as soon as the felt the buoy being pulled the boat released the buoy. Most of our buoy deployments were 40-120' using a 3 ton serrated anchor and chain.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2017, 11:50:17 by Colin P »

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #55 on: October 26, 2017, 13:24:28 »
One thing I have noted over the years is that the West Coast and East Coast CCG do everything differently and both will tell you that the other is wrong. :)

Atlantic region and Newfoundland region did everything different and both said the other was wrong...

You can imagine how it went when they merged a few years ago....

The only real consistency across the organization is that they're all out to lunch on a many things :)
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

jollyjacktar

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #56 on: October 26, 2017, 13:47:07 »
Atlantic region and Newfoundland region did everything different and both said the other was wrong...

You can imagine how it went when they merged a few years ago....

The only real consistency across the organization is that they're all out to lunch on a many things :)

So, no different than the navy then.

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #57 on: October 26, 2017, 14:13:33 »
Actually, a lot different than the Navy.

To understand the Canadian Coast Guard, and I am sorry to be this blunt, you have to understand that you are fundamentally dealing with a bunch of merchant ships manned by a bunch of merchant seaman, who to make matters worse are civil servants.

When I served in the Navy in Quebec city, one of my friend was the Engineering Mate on the Norman McLeod (one of the two alternating one). That was his civil service job. It was his - no rotation to shore jobs, posting to "headquarters ' or change in posting - until he decided to retire or until he elected to apply for a different job in the civil service.

The qualifications that the Coast Guard officers are given are merchant seaman certificates and they are free to go and use them onboard any other merchant ship. Since there is no "centralized" training system and they are merchant seaman, there are no orders or regulations or other similar document that would standardize anything across the whole Coast Guard and each ship's crew is free to do things and use method for operating that they will, so long as they are compatible with good seamanship practices in the general merchant world.

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #58 on: October 26, 2017, 14:21:08 »
The qualifications that the Coast Guard officers are given are merchant seaman certificates and they are free to go and use them onboard any other merchant ship. Since there is no "centralized" training system and they are merchant seaman, there are no orders or regulations or other similar document that would standardize anything across the whole Coast Guard and each ship's crew is free to do things and use method for operating that they will, so long as they are compatible with good seamanship practices in the general merchant world.

Quite accurate.

Any consistency within a region is only due to circulation of personnel within a region over a long period.

The equipment used isn't standardized either, there may be procurement of some items nationally, but after that, much of it is bought by region, or by individual vessel...

For example, at construction, each of the 1100 class bouy tenders were roughly the same, at least their major systems were the same, but after 30+ years of refits, they're all well diverged, as the refits are all managed at the regional level.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2017, 14:29:59 by Not a Sig Op »
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #59 on: October 26, 2017, 16:41:42 »
The Black and Pearkes were roughly the same, but the East Coast preferred a aft leading crane and the West want a forward leading crane, which affected the height of the superstructure. When they wanted to transfer ships from West to East they discovered that the Marine Certificates issued by the CCG College had no international standard, quite embarrassing. They ended up having to get the certification for the college done and I think they had to hire a Master to be on the ship to sail it through the Panama Canal. The Norm McLeod came out here and according to people working on her, she was in terrible shape, asbestos was flaking off her pipes and ceiling, the refit was cancelled and she was sold off after sitting at the dock. Torn apart and rebuilt as a mega yacht. The West coast got screwed on that deal.   

jollyjacktar

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #60 on: October 26, 2017, 16:42:04 »
Actually, a lot different than the Navy.

I was being more tongue in cheek than anything else.  As the East and West coast each think they're doing it right and the other guys are wrong.  We may be not as extreme as the CG but we do have some bi-polar tendencies too.

Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #61 on: October 27, 2017, 19:55:12 »
Not good, can't imagine why it's been out of service this long?

https://buyandsell.gc.ca/procurement-data/tender-notice/PW-MD-021-26497

2. Definition of the requirement

o The CCGS Ann Harvey has been out of service since April 2015, leaving a large service gap in CCGs operational mandate in the North Atlantic. The purpose of this contract is to refit the vessel back into operating condition and allow it to return to full service as rapidly as possible.
o The Canadian Coast Guard has a requirement for the drydocking, engine installation and limited refit of the CCGS Ann Harvey. The working period for the drydocking is January 18, 2018 to June 15, 2018.  The CCGS Ann Harvey is presently a dead ship.  The vessel has no means of propulsion or working controls to operate the vessel to travel to any other port under its own power.  The drydocking will include the installation of three new engines, a new propulsion control system, a new bow thruster, a new sewage treatment system, hull coating. The refit will also include selected regulatory work and certification requiring drydocking (pulling and inspecting the tail shafts, seals, stern tubes, propellers, rudder) and miscellaneous regulatory surveys of the sea bays, sea chests, void spaces; fire prevention system/pumps.
o The current drydocking schedule for the CCGS Ann Harvey is facilitated by the arrival of the propulsion engines to be installed, allowing the vessel to return to operational service. Moving the vessel to an alternate location would, in its present condition, require a heavy lift transfer since CCG considers a tow in the North Atlantic along the Grand Banks of NL during the winter season too large of a risk for the asset, and CCG will not permit the towing of the vessel in the timeline required by this contract. Further to this, due to scheduled alongside repair work before and after the above stated work period, the vessel is not available for a tow outside of the timeline of this contract.

3. Criteria for assessment of the Statement of Capabilities (Minimum Essential Requirements)

o Any interested supplier must demonstrate by way of a statement of capabilities that its product/equipment/system (as appropriate) meets the following requirements:

1. Operating shipyard, equipped with steel plate cutting, and steel fabricating capabilities to support the required work.
2. The shipyard must be equipped with a certified drydock or certified floating dock capable of drydocking the CCGS Ann Harvey for the working period (January 18 2017 to June 15, 2018)
3. The Contractor must possess CSA W47.1, Certification for Companies for Fusion Welding of Steel (Minimum Div 2) or equivalent.
4. The supplier must be willing to accept full care and custody of the vessel from CCGS Base St. Johns to their facility, and assume all liability for the vessel while in their custody.
5. Vessel transfer and work scope would have to be completed within the time frame noted above
6. As part of their Statement of Capabilities, the shipyard will be required to include in their costing:
a.  a naval architect to develop a docking plan (including blocking plan) to safely dock and undock the vessel in their dry dock
b. the cost of completing the scope of work described above,
c. the cost of transferring the vessel to their facility.
7. As noted above, shipyards interested in submitting a Statement of Capabilities would be required to include in their costing a heavy lift vessel transfer to their facility (with all applicable insurance coverage).

4. Applicability of the trade agreement(s) to the procurement

o This procurement is subject to the following trade agreement:
       The Canadian Free Trade Agreement (CFTA)

5. Set-aside under the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business
             Not applicable

6. Comprehensive Land Claims Agreement(s):
             Not applicable

7. Justification for the Pre-Identified Supplier

o The pre-identified supplier is the closest shipyard to the CCG Base in St. Johns, with the infrastructure required to drydock the vessel. It would not require the vessel to leave the safety of its home port.

8. Government Contracts Regulations Exception(s)

The following exception(s) to the Government Contracts Regulations is (are) invoked for this procurement under subsection subsection 6(c), and (d)

     6 Notwithstanding section 5, a contracting authority may enter into a contract without soliciting bids where
           6(c) the nature of the work is such that it would not be in the public interest to solicit bids;
           6(d) only one person is capable of performing the contract.


9. Exclusions and/or Limited Tendering Reasons
            Not applicable

10. Ownership of Intellectual Property
       Not applicable.

11. Period of the proposed contract or delivery date

o The estimated drydocking and work period for CCGS Ann Harvey is between January 18 2018 and June 15, 2018. 

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #62 on: October 27, 2017, 21:34:13 »
Not good, can't imagine why it's been out of service this long?

Because they punched a large hole in it and flooded three compartments, including her antiquated propulsion system.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/ann-harvey-under-tow-on-2-day-journey-to-st-john-s-1.3023084

She and her sister ships already had a mid-life extension planned for around now, she just got pushed to the front of the line.

It's just moving at the speed of government.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2017, 06:03:57 by Not a Sig Op »
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #63 on: October 30, 2017, 10:28:02 »
Thanks, I forgot about that incident. The 1100 are a good all round design, she be worth fixing.

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #64 on: October 30, 2017, 18:34:31 »
Thanks, I forgot about that incident. The 1100 are a good all round design, she be worth fixing.

They're good boats, but they're only worth fixing because we're so bad at buying new ones.

The scope of the job on the Harvey is not likely much more than the scope of the midlife will be on her sister ships... another suffered a rather violent generator failure about five years ago... they (the generators) had exceeded the recommended service life from the manufacturer by a number of years... not sure what happened since, but the plan at the time was to run it on two instead of three until the midlife... so they're still in service, still past the end of their life, and they're five years older now.

Tender for generator replacement on all six boats... https://buyandsell.gc.ca/procurement-data/tender-notice/PW-ML-044-26020

Edit: After a little bit of google, looks like ABB will be replacing the propulsion drives...

http://www.abb.ca/cawp/seitp202/b63e2106dadbb404c12581390045dd74.aspx

They make a good, durable, idiot proof drive system... the coast guard makes a good, durable idiot though, and it'll be a night and day change from what they're used to dealing with, so hopefully it'll end well ;)
« Last Edit: October 30, 2017, 18:48:15 by Not a Sig Op »
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #65 on: October 31, 2017, 10:16:40 »
Interesting, thanks for all the info, I have been away from the fleet for sometime and lost the pulse.

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #66 on: October 31, 2017, 12:07:25 »
Interesting, thanks for all the info, I have been away from the fleet for sometime and lost the pulse.

I've been asked a few times if I'd go back.

They may have thought I was joking when I said sure, right after you have a 400% pay raise and the fleet goes dry.

It's certainly an interesting place to work though.
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #67 on: October 31, 2017, 12:34:59 »
yea they are struggling to hire out here as well. We had guys from the weather ships when I was in the fleet, those guys were serious alcoholics, on the SAR vessels, drinking was not much of a problem, the buoy tenders were, the Layday system was just introduced as I arrived on the Pearkes and that forced some of them to get a life off of the ship, which was literally their home. I did luck out and get a fabulous Bosun who was great to learn from.

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #68 on: October 31, 2017, 12:41:18 »
yea they are struggling to hire out here as well. We had guys from the weather ships when I was in the fleet, those guys were serious alcoholics, on the SAR vessels, drinking was not much of a problem, the buoy tenders were, the Layday system was just introduced as I arrived on the Pearkes and that forced some of them to get a life off of the ship, which was literally their home. I did luck out and get a fabulous Bosun who was great to learn from.

From what I understand, alcoholism isn't *as* rampant as it once was...

The *second* time we had an emergency at sea, and we couldn't muster a sober full sober fire team, I said I had enough.

There's policies on the consumption of alcohol, both on and off SAR, but enforcement varies widely depending on the skipper... SAR tasking meant the boat was dry, but practically speaking, it just meant the canteen stopped selling beer, hope you brought enough for yourself.

Purely my opinion, but if they were able to completely clear house of a lot of the existing crew, and reinterview for anyone who wants their job back, it might be a decent spot to work, eliminate the "old school" mentality, and bring in some fresh young keen individuals.

They've opened skipper and chief competitions up to the public since last year, which I think is a good thing, though the downside, they won't get the really talented individuals without opening up the purse strings as well.

Like I said, it's an interesting spot to work at least.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2017, 12:45:28 by Not a Sig Op »
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline Spencer100

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #70 on: November 20, 2017, 14:45:53 »
Good grief!  CCGS Hudson is 54-years old--just buy new vessels wherever built:

Quote
Costs pile up from delayed Canadian Coast Guard vessel refit
Coast guard has been forced to charter 3 private vessels at a cost of $2.58 million, excluding tax

The Canadian Coast Guard has been forced to spend more than $2.5 million this fall to charter vessels to carry out at-sea science surveys because a much-delayed refit has left its own research ship unavailable.

Canada's East Coast ocean monitoring program usually takes place on the CCGS Hudson, but the 54-year old vessel is still not ready after a $4-million refit ran six months behind schedule.

In place of the Hudson, the coast guard has been forced to charter three private vessels at a cost of $2.58 million, excluding tax, CBC News has learned.

"Requests for proposals processes were conducted to secure alternative vessels for three zones which have been surveyed every year since 1998," Department of Fisheries and Oceans spokesperson Vance Chow said in a response to CBC News questions about the fallout from the refit.
Vital information on ocean health

The twice-annual surveys collect a wide range of physical, chemical and biological data to measure ocean conditions...


    $4M refit contract for coast guard research vessel under review

    Why Ottawa yanked a Coast Guard ship out of $4M refit

As for the Hudson, it returned to its home port in Halifax one week ago, with the refit still unfinished.

"There is some minor outstanding work required that will be conducted alongside the ship's home port at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography," Chow said.

Lloyd's Register, the U.K.-based marine safety certifier, has given the vessel an interim provisional certificate, which is valid until Jan. 31, 2018...


The CCGS Hudson is now docked at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Dartmouth, N.S
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/coast-guard-coasts-delayed-hudson-refit-1.4407288

Mark
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #71 on: January 09, 2018, 12:08:20 »
Comprehensive piece on CCG's acquistions of new helos (note single pilot)--effectively sole-sourcing glossed over but in any event was almost no public attention/controversy as airfrcraft made by Bell Montreal and CAF procurements are the ones media/pols focus on:

Quote
Better, Faster, Stronger: The Canadian Coast Guard’s new helicopter fleet
https://www.verticalmag.com/features/better-faster-stronger-canadian-coast-guards-new-helicopter-fleet/


The Coast Guard base in Shearwater, Nova Scotia, received its 412EPI in June 2017, and pilots have been quick to praise the additional capabilities it provides. Mike Reyno Photo

Mark
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #72 on: January 11, 2018, 15:45:59 »
These smaller vessels being built by shipyards outside NSS with "infrastructure" money--spreading the pork around but glad something being produced (cost?):

Quote
Canadian Coast Guard picks Furuno for new SAR vessel class



The Canadian Coast Guard has selected Furuno to outfit its new Bay class search and rescue vessels.

The 55-foot CCGS Pennant Bay and CCGS Baie De Plaisance are the first of twelve hulls ordered by the CCG, with an option for six more.

CCGS Pennant Bay was built by Hike Metal Products in Wheatley, Ontario, while Baie De Plaisance was built by shipbuilder Chantier-Naval Forillon, Inc. in Gaspe, Quebec.

These new Bay class vessels, all named for Canadian bays, have been commissioned under Canada's Federal Infrastructure Initiative and the 2016-17 Fleet Renewal Plan.

The vessel's new Furuno electronics, including a multi-station NavNet TZtouch network with radar and depth sounder, will assist the CCG in its mission of keeping Canadians and Canadian waterways safe...
http://www.marinelog.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=28078:canadian-coast-guard-picks-furuno-for-new-sar-vessel-class&Itemid=257

Mark
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #73 on: January 16, 2018, 13:54:25 »
Further to this post,
https://milnet.ca/forums/index.php/topic,122642.msg1510147.html#msg1510147

what's going on?

Quote
Heddle Marine wins Coast Guard contract months after aborted refit
$4-million exterior overhaul of CCGS Hudson fell months behind schedule and was left incomplete

Questions are being raised about the awarding of another refit contract for the Canadian Coast Guard ship Hudson to the same company behind an aborted refit on the science research ship last year.

"My question is, with the problems with that dry docking, why was this firm allowed to bid on this one?" asked Wayne Snow, the CEO of Dartmouth-based KMS Industries Inc.

Snow was an unsuccessful bidder on a mechanical refit of the Hudson. The work was awarded Friday to Heddle Marine Service Inc (NL).

    Costs pile up from delayed Canadian Coast Guard vessel refit

It's an affiliate of Heddle Marine Services, which carried out the troubled $4-million exterior overhaul of CCGS Hudson in 2017.

That refit was months behind schedule and still unfinished when Public Services and Procurement Canada stepped in in October and towed Hudson out of the Heddle Marine shipyard in Hamilton, Ont.

Why a second chance?

The plan was to complete the refit at a federal facility in nearby Burlington, Ont., but the job was incomplete when Hudson returned to its Halifax home port in November. The vessel was operating under an interim provision certificate by Lloyds Register.

The contract has been under review for months and outstanding issues remain.

    Canadian Coast Guard ship back in Halifax 6 months later than planned

"For us, it's an issue that should be answered by government as to why this company is allowed to come back and bid after not completing the first refit," said Tony Kennedy of Canadian Marine Engineering, another losing bidder.

Kennedy and Snow are competitors, but are united in speaking out on this tender...

The winning bid is for 61 days of mechanical refits while CCGS Hudson is alongside its home base at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography.

Work is supposed to conclude in March, with Hudson available for spring science cruises.

As for the disputed contract at its Hamilton shipyard, Padulo said the company and PSPC are "finalizing" outstanding issues.

"Although there were challenges on both sides, we are working toward an amicable resolution," he said in an email to CBC News.

The federal government has never explained what went wrong with Heddle's 2017 refit nor whether it paid the company the full $4-million contract price. Months of delays had a costly cascading effect, they have admitted.

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans spent $2.5 million in 2017 chartering private vessels for scientific cruises because the Hudson was not available...

Public Services and Procurement Canada did not respond to CBC questions.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/canadian-coast-guard-contracts-refit-ccgs-hudson-1.4486111

Gosh.

Mark
Ottawa





Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #74 on: January 16, 2018, 20:19:34 »
The CCGS Hudson is 55 years old, and in poor condition...

An equally important question is why is the government so bad at replacing boats.

Heddle does about the same quality of work as any other marine contractor in Canada.
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.