Author Topic: Canadian government (this one and previous) not cyber serious  (Read 3155 times)

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Offline MarkOttawa

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With just the Brits in mind:

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The Lions’s Cyber Roar: UK Getting Really Serious, Unlike Canada
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/mark-collins-the-lionss-cyber-roar-uk-getting-really-serious-unlike-canada/

Just after Conservatives left office:

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Canadian Federal Government (and others) Not Cyber Serious
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2015/11/24/mark-collins-canadian-federal-government-and-others-not-cyber-serious/

As for CAF, from June;

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Offensive Cyber Capability for Canadian Forces? Is the New Government Cyber Serious?
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/06/23/mark-collins-offensive-cyber-capability-for-canadian-forces-is-the-new-government-cyber-serious/

Mark
Ottawa
« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 22:13:26 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Humphrey Bogart

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Re: Canadian government (this one and previous) not cyber serious
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2016, 22:23:55 »
With just the Brits in mind:

Just after Conservatives left office:

As for CAF, from June;

Mark
Ottawa

Cyber Security, one of multiple areas the government doesn't take seriously.

Offline SupersonicMax

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Re: Canadian government (this one and previous) not cyber serious
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2016, 07:33:49 »
Not only cyber security but also cyber warfare. 

Offline Journeyman

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Re: Canadian government (this one and previous) not cyber serious
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2016, 07:40:55 »
...also warfare, writ large.
There’s nothing more maddening than debating someone who doesn’t know history, doesn’t read books, and frames their myopia as virtue. The level of unapologetic conjecture I’ve encountered lately isn’t just frustrating, it’s retrogressive, unprecedented, and absolutely terrifying.
~Chris Evans

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Canadian government (this one and previous) not cyber serious
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2017, 18:57:46 »
Rather timely, what with events down south. Canadian gov't still cyber security sucking, further to these posts,

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Offensive Cyber Capability for Canadian Forces? Is the New Government Cyber Serious?
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/06/23/mark-collins-offensive-cyber-capability-for-canadian-forces-is-the-new-government-cyber-serious/

Canada: “Time to get serious about cyber security”
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/08/23/mark-collins-canada-time-to-get-serious-about-cyber-security/

the latest (further links at original),

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Government computer networks can’t standup to cyberattacks: Report

Canadian federal government agencies desperately need to beef up their cybersecurity posture, according to a recent report.

Documents from Public Safety Canada indicate that the country is a prime target for cybercrime, state-sponsored cyberattacks, and lone wolf-type hackers.

Consulting firm Pricewaterhouse Coopers prepared for the federal public safety and emergency organization by which revealed that Canada’s federal information technology systems are ill-equipped to handle potential cyberattacks.

The report said Canadian government budgets, resources, and capabilities “are simply not up to the overall challenge,” according to the Canadian Press.

The report recommended the federal government engage the public sector to help the Ottawa deal with its cybersecurity challenges. For instance, the government can co-operate with small and medium-sized businesses in developing cybersecurity solutions. It also suggested closer collaboration with the U.S. which spends billions of dollars on cybersecurity.

However, the report cautioned that surveillance and information-gathering aimed at countering cyber threats must be balanced with people’s privacy and personal liberties. The report said strict criteria for the use of collected data, as well as sufficient oversight, should be created.

Canada and the United States have traditionally worked together against cyberattackers, according to French Caldwell, chief evangelist at governance, risk, and compliance company MetricStream.

“But no matter how many defensive and preventative measures you put in place, it takes only one successful hack to get access very often to sensitive information,” he said. “The treats can be insider threats, nation-states, or they can be cyber criminals…it can be a very, very tough game to play.”

Caldwell is a former nuclear submariner who wrote the book Artic Leverage, Canadian Sovereignty and Security, which focused on the reasons behind Canada’s submarine program back in the 1990’s. He also helped plan a war game called Digital Pearl Habour for the White House and the U.S. Naval College to determine if it was possible to launch a cyberattack against North America. The findings of Caldwell and 150 other researchers was, yes, it is possible...

Early last year, security vendor FireEye also released a report which warned that Canada and other western nations remain the targets of more than a dozen hacker groups which may or may not have ties with the Chinese government.

FireEye said that between 2013 and May 2016, the company’s customers experiences 262 cyber breaches which have been traced to 72 suspected China-based groups in 26 countries, including Canada.  The company did not reveal how many of the incidents involved Canadian firms or government departments...

Canada’s spy agency has openly said that China and Russia are not intent on stealing national secrets.

In 2014, the Canadian government said Chinese state-sponsored hackers broke into the National Research Council’s computer networks. The attack resulted in the shutdown of the agency’s system.

Back in 2011, the networks of the finance department, Treasury Board, and the Defence Research and Development agency were forced to go of offline in the face of a sustained cyberattack. The breaches were attributed to actors from inside China.

“We are currently engaged in a cyberwar,” said Caldwell. “But unlike in the Cold War where we rarely physically engaged the opposition, were are engaged in cyberwar day-to-day.”
http://www.vanguardcanada.com/2017/01/12/government-computer-networks-cant-standup-to-cyberattacks-report/

Mark
Ottawa

Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Canadian government (this one and previous) not cyber serious
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2017, 11:19:20 »
Canadian cyber security efforts pathetic compared to others:

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Canada’s allies racing ahead on boosting cyber security, PM told
As Canada's government ponders a new cyber security direction, the country's closest security allies are spending billions on the issue.

Canada’s closest allies are pumping billions into new cyber security plans as Ottawa ponders a new approach to defending the country’s vital cyber systems and networks.

A 2016 briefing note prepared for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau noted the U.S., U.K., Australia and New Zealand have all updated their cyber security strategies, with the U.S. planning to spend $24 billion to bolster the country’s defences.

Canada is still operating under a cyber security plan devised in 2010. And compared with the updated plans of the other “Five Eyes” countries, Ottawa spends comparatively little to protect the public and private systems that underpin everything from online banking to the government’s top-secret network.

The briefing note was prepared by Canada’s most senior public servant, Michael Wernick, and obtained under access to information law. In it, Wernick stated that these “allied strategies reflect a fundamental enlargement of cyber security issues into policy areas” including research and development, trade and market development, and international relations.

They also emphasize cyber security needs to be addressed across all government departments, Wernick wrote.

The Liberals have pledged to revamp Canada’s approach to cyber defence, and recently completed months of public consultations on the issue. The results of that survey have not been made public, but are expected to be released by Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale sometime this spring.

Scott Bardsley, a spokesperson for Goodale, said that it would premature to talk about what the Liberals’ approach to cyber security will be.

“When Canada’s current cyber security strategy was launched over seven years ago, there was no Instagram and Netflix had just launched in Canada,” Bardsley noted.

“A lot has changed since then, which is why the prime minister mandated a review of measures to protect Canadians and our critical infrastructure from cyber threats.”

Bardsley pointed to $77.4 million committed in the Liberal’s first budget to improve the “security of government networks and information technology systems.” But that money is spread out over five years, and only $27 million is expected to be spent before 2019.

Australia, Wernick’s briefing note states, has committed $227 million for cyber security over the next five years. Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull also appointed a new minister of cyber security, as well as an advisor and “cyber ambassador”

In a statement earlier this week, Turnbull called cyber security the “new frontier of warfare.”

“This is the new frontier of warfare, the new frontier of espionage, it’s the new frontier of many threats to Australian families, to governments, to businesses,” Turnbull said in a statement.

Turnbull connected the threat directly to allegations that Russia interfered with the 2016 U.S. presidential election. American intelligence officials allege Moscow hacked the emails of several prominent Democratic Party officials and released them through Wikileaks.

In an unclassified report, U.S. spies alleged Russian President Vladimir Putin was personally involved in the hacking campaign, a claim Moscow denies.

The U.S. has proposed $24 billion in spending to enhance their government’s cyber security, as well as to help private businesses and individuals to protect themselves, the briefing note states...
https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/01/27/canadas-allies-racing-ahead-on-boosting-cyber-security-pm-told.html

And a related topic:

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Former CSE chief Maj.-Gen. (ret'd) John Adams wants CAF offensive cyber
http://milnet.ca/forums/index.php/topic,125063.0.html

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.