Author Topic: Wynne approval ratings  (Read 2700 times)

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Offline Journeyman

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Wynne approval ratings
« on: September 04, 2017, 07:35:44 »
Hell is in Ontario?
To even ask, you must not know of our Premier... and her satanic minions, Ontario Hydro and MTO.
Sadly amazed at people cheering on the spread of kakistocracy.   :not-again:

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2017, 08:53:59 »
To even ask, you must not know of our Premier... and her satanic minions, Ontario Hydro and MTO.

I'm not sure how accurate it is but I just read more people in Ontario believe in big foot than approve of Wynne.
There are no wolves on Fenris

Offline Loachman

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2017, 09:50:20 »
Maybe Bigfoot should run in the next election, then.

He certainly couldn't do a worse job.

Online Retired AF Guy

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2017, 16:24:08 »
Maybe Bigfoot should run in the next election, then.

He certainly couldn't do a worse job.

26 % actually think its not a bad idea. More here from Thursdays National Post:

Quote
Prime Minister Trump and King Charles: Here are all the things more popular than Kathleen Wynne now


Tristin Hopper
 
August 31, 2017
 
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne’s current approval rating sits at a rock-bottom 15 per cent. This makes her not only the least popular first minister in Canada right now, but one of the least popular political leaders in modern Canadian history.

Behold, our very mean gallery of all the things proportionally more popular among Canadians than the Ontario premier.

NOTE: This story breaks all kinds of rules regarding accurate statistical comparison. Please do not use it to inform your civic behaviour.

The penny (32%)

It was a useless disk of almost zero monetary value that wasn’t worth the copper it contained. And yet, there were Canadians who thought it was a travesty to get rid of our one-cent coin. In 2012, the year of the penny’s demise, the Angus Reid Institute found that 32 per cent of Canadians did not want to live in a world without pennies.

A border guard searching your phone without a warrant (22%)

Earlier this month, a Forum Research poll asked Canadians whether they would like the guards at our borders to be able to requisition their electronics and flip through them looking for compromising information. Nearly half didn’t like the idea, but to a committed group of 22 per cent, the prospect of having a CBSA agent swipe through their cat photos sounded just great.

Cheating on your spouse (16%)

Adulterers are likely a much greater constituency than we acknowledge, but that doesn’t mean Canadians think it’s a good idea to philander. In a July 2016 poll, Ababus Data asked Canadians whether adultery was “morally acceptable.” Only 16 per cent replied in the affirmative.

Saying sorry every single hour (17%)


In June, a Forum Research poll sought to find out how often Canadians apologize. Thirty-eight per cent of us say “sorry” every day, while a committed core of 17 per cent reported that they apologized “hourly.” And yes, hack comedians, there are indeed more Canadian men apologizing hourly than Canadian women.

The climate is unchanged (15%)

To be clear, this isn’t the number of Canadians who believe that humans aren’t causing climate change. No, this is a fringier group who believe the climate isn’t actually changing at all. The melting ice caps, the rising sea levels, the old Albertans who keep telling us the winters aren’t as cold anymore? All a bunch of media propaganda, apparently. In 2015, Forum Research found 15 per cent of Canadians stubbornly believe that the earth’s climate is just fine.

Banning all immigration to Canada (19%)

Canada, as a rule, is pretty cool with immigrants. While politicians who want to close the border are common in Europe, even Canada’s most extreme major party candidate of recent years, Kellie Leitch, never came close to saying that we should stop immigration completely. Nevertheless, a February report by the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada found that 19 per cent of Canadians backed the David Suzuki-esque view that “Canada is full.”

Prime Minister Donald Trump (20%)

Back in May, 2016, Abacus Data asked Canadians how they would vote if the U.S. presidential candidates were angling to be prime minister. Unsurprisingly, Democrat Hillary Clinton utterly swept the Great White North, although Donald Trump still managed to capture 20 per cent support. When asked how Trump would fare against Bernie Sanders in Canada, the Republican candidate’s vote share dropped to 18 per cent.

King Charles III (26%)

In 2011, Abacus Data asked Canadians to disregard the normal rules of monarchic succession and indicate whom they would like to succeed Queen Elizabeth II: Prince Charles or his son, William. Unsurprisingly, Prince William and his new wife were the clear favourites to become the next king and queen of Canada, with 56 per cent support. But a group of 26 per cent staunchly maintained that it was Charles’ turn.

Joe Clark (17%)

In early 2016, Abacus Data asked Canadians to rate the last seven people who became prime minister as a result of winning an election (ie: no Kim Campbells or John Turners allowed). Last place was occupied by Joe Clark, who gained only 17 per cent approval — exactly the same as his disapproval rating. Tragically for Joe Clark, the vast majority of Canadians either didn’t know who he was (25 per cent) or didn’t care (41 per cent).

Politicians (24%) and car salesmen (28%)

In June, Insights West got a group of Canadians to rank a list of professions by how much they liked them. Nurses topped the list (92 per cent positive approval), and even lawyers managed to grab a 50 per cent approval rating. At the bottom of the list, however, were politicians (24 per cent) and car salespeople (28 per cent).

Bigfoot (26%)

To be sure, if Bigfoot faced Kathleen Wynne in a provincial election it’s likely Ontarians would ultimately side with the human candidate. When the Angus Reid Institute asked Canadians in August, 2016 whether they believed in “cryptids” — scientifically unproven animals such as Bigfoot or the Loch Ness Monster — 26 per cent expressed some measure of support for the idea.

Selling arms to Saudi Arabia (19%)

As a terrorism-sponsoring absolute monarchy that publicly executes homosexuals, Saudi Arabia rightly doesn’t have the best reputation with Canadians. That’s why, when it came to a $15-billion arms deal with the kingdom, the Angus Reid Institute found a plurality of Canadians opposed the move. However, 19 per cent maintained that putting Canadian weapons and equipment in Saudi hands was a “good idea.”

Pronouncing Toronto as ‘Tronnah’ (26%)

In the non-Toronto parts of Canada, it is a popular pastime to jokingly pronounce the name of the country’s largest city as “Tronnah” in the belief that this is how the locals say it. However, according to an August 2016 Forum Research poll, the enunciation of Toronto’s citizens is just fine: Only 26 per cent favoured “Tronnah.”

Russia (15%)

As far as we know, Russia hasn’t interfered with any Canadian elections. However, with the annexation of Crimea, the invasion of Ukraine and a whole bunch of other shady stuff, Russia now ranks as Canadians’ least popular major foreign government. In August, Abacus Data found that only 15 per cent of us had a positive view of the Russian government.

An Afghan-style deployment (38%)

A 2014 Abacus Data poll found that Canadians are proud of the men and women who served in Afghanistan, but are generally skeptical that the whole operation was worth it. If Canada was asked to embark on another Afghanistan, only 38 per cent reported that it would be a good idea.

The burka (29%)

In April, the Angus Reid Institute gauged Canadians’ approval of various religious garments. Crucifixes, the Jewish kippah and Sikh turbans all scored pretty well, but at the bottom of the list were Islamic garments designed to cover women’s faces, the niqab (32 per cent approval) and the burka (29 per cent approval).

The FALSE belief that vaccines cause autism (19%)

Vaccines do not cause autism. The whole myth was started by a single fraudulent study that has since been disavowed by almost everyone who had anything to do with it. And yet the belief persists. A 2016 poll by the Ontario Science Centre found that 19 per cent of Canadians continued to suspect a link between autism and vaccinations.

Okay with drunk driving (16%)

Impaired driving remains one of Canada’s leading criminal causes of death, yet drunk driving still has a stunningly good public reputation in Canada. In a troubling December study by Ipsos-Reid, 16 per cent of Canadians reported that they “feel comfortable driving after a few drinks, even though they might be over the legal limit.”

• Email: thopper@nationalpost.com | Twitter: TristinHopper

Article Link (with photos)
Years ago, fairy tales all began with, "Once upon a time." Now we know they all began with, "If I'm elected."

Carolyn Warner

Offline Journeyman

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2017, 08:21:14 »
....even lawyers managed to grab a 50 per cent approval rating
Fake news!!   MSM bullshit!!   >:(
Sadly amazed at people cheering on the spread of kakistocracy.   :not-again:

Offline Bird_Gunner45

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2017, 10:36:27 »
26 % actually think its not a bad idea. More here from Thursdays National Post:

Article Link (with photos)

Trump polled at 20%??? I assume that 18 of those 20% post in the politics threads on this site  ;D

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2017, 13:40:58 »
Trump polled at 20%??? I assume that 18 of those 20% post in the politics threads on this site  ;D

 :rofl:

But seriously.

« Last Edit: September 05, 2017, 15:44:04 by Jarnhamar »
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Offline Bird_Gunner45

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2017, 18:15:53 »

Offline PuckChaser

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2017, 18:40:04 »
Kathleen Wynne's approval ratings are so low, they get their own topic. I also moved it back into the Politics board so we can keep the discussion away from those who don't care to see it.

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2017, 20:58:26 »
Why, did she complain?

Offline PuckChaser

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2017, 21:57:17 »
Her complaints wouldn't hold water with me, but we have politics boards for a reason now and this stuff was way off original topic.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2017, 22:14:46 »
Sadly, I was at a Patrick Brown event recently and it looks perilously like he's going to crash and burn like his two predecessors. There's no "there" there......
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline George Wallace

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2017, 18:02:40 »
The Wynne Government must think we are all fools:

Reproduced under the Fair Dealings provisions of the Copyright Act.

Quote
$15 wage law could cost 50,000 jobs, says report
Your essential daily news Pace and degree of the hike is unprecedented, watchdog says
Metro Canada (Ottawa)13 Sep 2017

More than 50,000 people could lose their jobs if the Ontario government goes ahead with its plan to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2019, the province’s financial watchdog said Tuesday in a report that assessed the economic impact of the proposed increase.

The job losses would be concentrated among teens and young adults, while the number of minimum wage workers in Ontario would increase from just over 500,000 to 1.6 million in 2019, the Financial Accountability Office said in its report. FAO chief economist David West said the province is entering “uncharted waters’’ with the increase because no other jurisdiction has gone so far so quickly.

While the move will have a positive impact on the province’s total labour market income — hiking it by 1.3 per cent — it will also result in job losses over a number of years.

“There’s evidence to suggest these job losses could be larger given the magnitude and rapid pace of this increase,’’ West said.

In July, Premier Kathleen Wynne announced her government would increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour by Jan. 1, 2019. The increase would be phased in gradually and would rise with inflation, as scheduled, from $11.40 currently to $11.60 in October, to $14 an hour on Jan. 1, 2018 and $15 the following year.

West said that while the FAO report makes no recommendations about the proposed policy, it does raise red flags for legislators. The report specifically sites the speed with which Ontario will phase in the change as a concern for business, he said. The proposed changes are in response to a governmentcommissioned report released last week that included 173 recommendations addressing precarious work. The Changing Workplaces review concluded that new technology, a shrinking manufacturing sector and fewer union jobs, among other factors, have left approximately one-third of Ontario’s 6.6 million workers vulnerable.

Minister Kevin Flynn said Tuesday that because of the province’s strong economy the government can move forward with the minimum wage increase.

He pointed to studies written in recent years by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the Center for Economic and Policy Research and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives that support the move.

“This money (people are) going to be making goes right back into the economy,’’ Flynn said. “This doesn’t go into trust funds or this doesn’t go offshore. This goes right back to Main Street.”

Of course they won't, fool!  They will not have any disposable income to do anything but scrap by purchasing only the essentials. 

This further proves that the Ontario Education System has failed its students for decades.   Even the Finance Minister can not do the simplest of Math calculations.  I have been saying right from the day of the first announcement, the increase of the Minimum Wage by 33% in less than two years will cause many jobs to be lost, many goods and services to cost more, and the number of Low Income workers to drastically increase three fold.  We will be right back where we started; except with a larger Lower Income group and a smaller Middle Class.

The Trudeau Government is further compounding this matter with their new tax increases on Corporations; mostly made up of Small Business, Professionals such as Doctors, and Farmers......adding more nails to the coffins.   

We have the inmates running the asylum.  (Two major court cases involving the Ontario Liberal Party may lock up a few, but that is not a guarantee.)

More on Metro Ottawa.



« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 18:24:21 by George Wallace »
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Offline whiskey601

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2017, 19:11:09 »
Sadly, I was at a Patrick Brown event recently and it looks perilously like he's going to crash and burn like his two predecessors. There's no "there" there......

Totally agree. Ontario really is screwed no matter which way the electorate turns.

Offline cavalryman

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2017, 21:29:43 »
Totally agree. Ontario really is screwed no matter which way the electorate turns.
Mostly because too much of the electorate is abysmally stupid, but that's democracy for you.  Rule by the will of the lowest common denominator.  The whole notion of universal franchise could never end in any other way.

Offline Larry Strong

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Re: Wynne approval ratings
« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2017, 23:25:01 »
Though from Alberta it's the same song.......

"Chef Paul" is a small business owner....

http://www.edmontonsun.com/2017/09/12/chef-paul-succeeding-despite-notley-ndp-attempts

Shared under the usual caveats.....

Quote
Hello Premier Notley,

It’s been awhile since I last reached out, just over a year to be more precise. I first reached out two years ago to share with you my story, and my perspective on your proposed minimum wage increase, and the impact it would have on me as a new small business owner.

Well, I’m pleased to share that despite your efforts I have managed to keep the doors to my small neighbourhood restaurant open for nearly two years now.

We are doing well, we have been well received by the community and our sales continue to climb, despite a sluggish economy. We even have a respectable bottom line, well, respectable for the restaurant industry.

It’s meant more sacrifice than I thought possible. Still some two years later I find myself at work six days a week, trying to play catch up on the seventh. Last week alone I spent nearly eighty hours in my business, seventy of which was on my feet, and more than fifty of which was with a knife in my hand, cooking.

The hours and the commitment have taken their toll on my body, my mind and my spirit. They have put a strain on my family life and have left me feeling a world of guilt for missing a great deal of my daughter’s precious milestones.

I’m not sharing that for pity. I knew what I was getting into, and I really do love what I do. I am proud of what we have accomplished and it doesn’t feel like work to be caring for our guests.

Here we are again though, only a few weeks away from yet another wage hike. This time the rate will increase another $1.40 an hour for minimum wage employees, which accounts for 40% of my workforce.

While many outsiders will look at me as a selfish business owner who wants to nickel and dime his people, I want to make it clear that the reality couldn’t be farther from the truth.

I am frustrated with this plan because you are forcing my hand, as a business owner to give raises to the only two groups of people in my business who don’t require a raise.

The first group of people is our dishwashers. These are all high school students, living in their parents’ houses, having nothing but maybe a cell phone bill to pay.

These kids don’t need to make $120 to work an eight hour shift. They need some pocket money for hanging out at the mall with their friends.

The second group of people getting a raise is our service staff. While the server at the neighbourhood coffee shop may need the extra $1.40 an hour, I can tell you that the server averaging $150 a day in tips could care less about the extra $9 on their paycheck for every six hour shift they work.

In fact, many of the seasoned veterans in the business fear that increasing the minimum wage will impact their tips, as the uninformed consumer assumes that these employees are now earning a living wage, thus leaving them less tips.

Let me be clear when I say I very much value my service staff, and want them to be well looked after. Saying that, I know that each and every one of them is fairly rewarded for their work.

Who really needs this money? Cooks, that’s who. While most servers have a decent home, drive a fairly reliable car, work about thirty hours a week, and have more than enough disposable income to spend freely, cooks are struggling to get by.

Most of my kitchen team can’t afford a car. They rely on public transportation, sometimes taking up to two hours to make it to work. If they can afford a vehicle, it’s most often an old jalopy, hanging on by a thread.

They work 10-12 hours a day, trying to make enough money to keep the lights on and a little food in the fridge. I recently had a sit down with one of my cooks who didn’t seem like he was his usual self.

After some chatting he confessed that he battled depression and was struggling to afford his medication. He is a single dad, trying to support his daughter and do the right thing.

It broke my heart to hear that he was forced to make the decision between putting food on the table or take care of his health. That’s on me as a leader to try to fix, for him, and for my entire team, but it would be nice to have the funds to give a hard working person like him a raise.

Instead, you’ve forced my hand, reached into my business to make that decision for me, as if you better understand how to operate it than I do. I have news for you. You don’t.

Don’t worry though, we will find a way to take care of our people. We will keep the doors open. We might even grow and expand, all that despite the efforts of your party, and your pal in Ottawa, who both seem to want to stifle small businesses.

In 2012 small business owners employed 35 per cent of all employees in the private sector in Alberta. Those businesses contributed 27 per cent of the province’s GDP, and yet it feels like no one is listening to us, so we are left to fend for ourselves.

Every day I put my all into my business, and the risk I take provides a livelihood for thirty people, a livelihood they wouldn’t have if it weren’t for the risk takers of the world.

As I said, we will go on, and we will continue to thrive, despite your attempts, and we will only be that much stronger for it. So for that, I thank you.

Shall we say same time next year? For what I can only presume will be our last in the series of pen pal letters? Only seems fair since you’re not very good at writing back.




Cheers
Larry
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 23:32:48 by Larry Strong »
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