Author Topic: Veterans Affairs Canada publishes results of National Survey 2017  (Read 1951 times)

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Offline Rifleman62

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Veterans were surveyed to measure effectiveness of services and benefits and assess overall well-being.

OTTAWA, Sept. 11, 2017 /CNW/ - Canada's Veterans deserve recognition and respect for their service. Canadians and the Government of Canada appreciate their sacrifices, which is why it is important to reach out to Veterans and their families to truly understand their needs and be able to assist them when and where they need it most.

In February and March of 2017, Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) conducted a survey of 1,508 War Service Veterans, Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and Royal Canadian Mounted Police members and Veterans, as well as survivors receiving Veterans Affairs Canada services and benefits.

The VAC National Survey 2017 showed a high level of satisfaction with VAC benefits and services, a strong dedication and respect from VAC staff, as well as highlighting some areas in need of improvement. The full results of the survey are published on the Library and Archives Canada website. A national survey will be conducted every two years in order to continue to measure the health and well-being of Veterans and how well VAC programs support them. The results of the VAC National Survey were analysed in order to identify areas in need of improvements. Further analysis is required in order to determine how best to address concerns and find the most effective way to improve VAC's services and benefits.

Quotes

"The results of the VAC National Survey 2017 show that while the department is meeting the needs of the majority of Veterans, there is still room for improvement. The feedback we received from this survey will help us adapt our services and benefits to continue to better serve Veterans and their families."
The Honourable Seamus O'Regan, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of the Department of National Defence

Quick Facts 

Surveyed Veterans were most pleased with the Veterans Independence Program (92%), Treatment Benefits Program (84%), and experience with VAC in the last twelve months (84%).

Areas in need of improvement are Case Management (73%), Disability Benefits (65%), and Rehabilitation services and vocational assistance program (45%).

The VAC National Survey 2017 found that 81% of Veterans surveyed were satisfied with the quality of services delivered.

The survey was answered by 1,508 Veterans, Canadian Armed Forces and RCMP members and survivors, individually, over the phone.
Links:

Results of the VAC National Survey 2017

Links:

Summary 8 pages: http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/200/301/pwgsc-tpsgc/por-ef/veterans_affairs_canada/2017/043-16-e/summary.pdf

Report 70 pages: https://army.ca/forums/index.php?action=post;board=116.0

Data Table 569 pages: http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/200/301/pwgsc-tpsgc/por-ef/veterans_affairs_canada/2017/043-16-e/tables.pdf
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Offline Tcm621

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Re: Veterans Affairs Canada publishes results of National Survey 2017
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2017, 21:21:30 »
Funny. I would never guess that 81‰ of people were happy with the service provided by VAC. From my interaction with people it is closer to 18%. I wonder who they talked to.


Edit: after further reading, it appears they had more people (28%) over 85 than they did under 55 (24%). So I would imagine very few of the people they talked to were dealing with the NVC and the claims process as it stands today.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 21:28:51 by Tcm621 »

Offline kratz

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Re: Veterans Affairs Canada publishes results of National Survey 2017
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2017, 23:06:32 »
In other words, "stats lie."   [:D
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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: Veterans Affairs Canada publishes results of National Survey 2017
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2017, 09:33:29 »
Article below shows Veterans Affairs Canada results of National Survey 2017 Pres Release is BS. Also while VAC is not meeting their 16 week mandate, the CP reporter did not delve into the stats to find out the time period the claims are taking after the 16 weeks. A very relevant piece of info.

http://www.metronews.ca/news/canada/2017/11/06/injured-veterans-having-to-wait-longer-for-service-internal-documents-show.html

Injured veterans having to wait longer for service, internal documents show - Lee Berthiaume The Canadian Press - Nov 06 2017

OTTAWA — Injured Canadian Forces veterans are being forced to wait longer than in years past to find out whether they qualify for financial aid, newly disclosed documents show.

The revelation, contained in internal Veterans Affairs Canada reports, comes not only with Remembrance Day less than a week away, but amid growing frustration from many injured ex-soldiers at the midway point of the Trudeau government's mandate.

It also represents a potential stumbling block as the government moves to implement its new strategy to combat suicide and improve mental health among Canada's military members and veterans.

The reports, obtained by The Canadian Press through the Access to Information Act, do show the government has made progress in hiring more case workers for injured veterans, as was promised during the last election.

But the time it takes to process applications for disability benefits and other financial aid has shot up under the Liberals, leaving many veterans in limbo for months as they wait to find out whether they qualify.

The documents suggest Veterans Affairs was surprised by a large increase in the number of disability claims in recent years, which can be made by anyone who suffers a long-term injury in uniform.

While officials were on track to process almost 4,000 more applications in 2016-17 than the 15,000 in 2014-15, the documents show that the number processed within 16 weeks dropped to 43 per cent from 66 per cent.

The target for Veterans Affairs is to process 80 per cent of applications within 16 weeks, and the results mean more than half of veterans were forced to wait more than four months to find out if they qualified for the benefit.

Officials also saw a precipitous drop when it came to applications to a different program that tops up the incomes of permanently injured veterans to 90 per cent of what they made while in the military.

Only 67 per cent of applications for what is known as the earnings loss benefit were processed within four weeks, compared to 86 per cent in 2014-15.
Officials blamed the problem on the large influx of requests received over the past two years, which they say they are working to address by hiring more staff and streamlining the adjudication process.

Veterans Affairs "is regularly examining the entire disability application process from intake to decisions to expedite decisions and respond to veterans' needs more quickly," spokesman Marc Lescoutre said in an email.

"We recognize that the adjudication process needs to be streamlined even further and additional adjudicators hired to make application decisions in a more effective and timely manner."

As for the earnings loss benefit, "we expect to be back within the published service standard by the end of the calendar year" following a review of the program, Lescoutre said.

Still, the department's problems are likely to stir discontent among veterans, who are already upset about the fact the Liberals have yet to reinstate lifelong disability pensions for injured ex-soldiers, as promised.

It also raises questions about the government's new suicide prevention strategy for military personnel and veterans, since financial security is seen as one of the main contributors to a successful post-military life.

In separate committee appearances last week, veterans' ombudsman Guy Parent and military ombudsman Gary Walbourne blasted the onerous process for deciding whether veterans should get benefits.

"Why is it so difficult to get into these programs? What is the reason for all the delay in the adjudication review processes?" Walbourne complained to the House of Commons committee on veterans affairs.

"We cannot continue to see this type of performance on turnaround times and accessibility into these programs and services."
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