Author Topic: Time use in the Regular forces  (Read 3613 times)

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Offline Move

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Time use in the Regular forces
« on: December 18, 2017, 15:24:51 »
Hello folks,

My concern regarding joining the regular is that I have a small farm. It would be better to put it straight ahead within a testamentary trust, and rent it out (for free, as long as they maintain the place, and they could keep farming revenues / with a special clause that I can come back any time if crap happens).
How do folks from the regular forces deal with their home? (no wifey for now)
Is regular forces 24/7/365 on base?

Regards,

Offline Brihard

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Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2017, 15:34:40 »
Hello folks,

My concern regarding joining the regular is that I have a small farm. It would be better to put it straight ahead within a testamentary trust, and rent it out (for free, as long as they maintain the place, and they could keep farming revenues / with a special clause that I can come back any time if crap happens).
How do folks from the regular forces deal with their home? (no wifey for now)
Is regular forces 24/7/365 on base?

Regards,

Some work a normal Mon-Fri. Others work shiftwork. All may sometimes be subject to being sent away for weeks or months or a year on training, tasking, and deployments. This can happen arbitrarily and with little notice. If you’re Navy you may go to sea for weeks or months and live on your ship. If you’re Army you may go to the field for same and be out of contact with society. Air Force May have missions or taskings all over the globe.

Your off time is generally your own and most jobs most of the time are Monday to Friday... But it’s unwise to retain any commitments that specifically rely on your personal ability to be consistently physically present or available.
Pacificsm is doctrine fostered by a delusional minority and by the media, which holds forth the proposition it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

Offline Move

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Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2017, 15:57:29 »
Oh wow, fair enough.

How do military folks usually deal when they have assets? Family trusts?

PS: Is **** really an illegal word?
« Last Edit: December 18, 2017, 16:13:08 by Move »

Offline PuckChaser

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Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2017, 16:39:07 »
How do military folks usually deal when they have assets? Family trusts?

Family trusts, or they become administrative burdens because they're never able to do taskings since they're so busy with other aspects of their life. The latter of those individuals usually has a short, unfulfilling career in the CAF.

If regular time commitment is an issue, there's always the Reserves.

Offline mariomike

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Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2017, 22:59:01 »
My concern regarding joining the regular is that I have a small farm.

In the Regular Force, you go where they send you:

"From time to time, Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members are moved – or posted – to different locations to perform their jobs."

"CAF members must be ready to be deployed on short notice."
https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/services/caf-jobs/life/moving-relocation.html

Is **** really an illegal word?

Depends on what you mean by ****.

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« Last Edit: December 18, 2017, 23:56:45 by mariomike »

Offline Brihard

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Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2017, 03:46:07 »
Oh wow, fair enough.

How do military folks usually deal when they have assets? Family trusts?

PS: Is **** really an illegal word?

Most simply don’t have anything of that nature beyond maybe house, car, some financial investments... not many are joinin gup while they own/operate a farm or business.
Pacificsm is doctrine fostered by a delusional minority and by the media, which holds forth the proposition it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

Offline FormerHorseGuard

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Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2018, 04:20:44 »
Farming is a great life. Army life is a great life style and career.
Farms do not move around the country.
Army life moves across the country and can take you around the world.
You can still own the farm but do not expect to have time to farm or do chores as you might not be in the same postal code let alone same province.
If you want to join the Forces.some advice for you.
1) sign up and see what happens. Get accepted. Then make the farm plan
2) get accepted. Look at renting the land out to a local farmer you know and trust. Get a legal contract done up. Make sure the farmer is fully insured and you are protected from accidents on your land.make sure you get paid rent or share of crop
1
3) Rent any house on the land to a second party. ( make rent affordable and that it covers costs of up keep and taxes on the house)
4) any equipment you own use your judgement. No one will treat it as you will want it looked after.
5) once the farm is taken care of. Start your army career and remember you have a nest egg to come back to when you get out.
6) have family or friend have access to check your property for you. But follow local rental laws as to proper notice etc to visit property.


Online FJAG

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Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2018, 16:31:14 »
I'm not sure what benefit a testamentary trust has in this situation. By definition, it is a trust which is created within your will at the time of your death so that the asset is not passed to the beneficiary completely, but under a manged structure.

As far as renting your farm out, most farmers that I have dealt with in the past, rent their farmland out under a crop share basis which leaves the tenant responsible for all the management of the land paying a percentage of the crops value to you each year. See a lawyer to ensure whatever agreement you make has all the terms that you want (including term of lease, structure and/or yardage included, equipment included, renewal options, condition the tenant has to leave the land in at end of lease etc.)

If the farm also has a residential structure that you wish to rent out ensure that you comply with any residential tenancy laws/regulations that apply in your province. Again, discuss it with your lawyer.

The advice that other posters have given you about what service is like is good. Take my word for it that regardless of whatever trade you are going into you will not have the time that you need to do anything other than check up on the farm occasionally. I had a battery commander who had a farm nearby once and while he rented it out he treated parts of it as a hobby farm on weekends - it was good for neither the battery nor the farm.

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