Author Topic: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)  (Read 7246 times)

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Offline Jarnhamar

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Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« on: January 01, 2018, 10:45:28 »
Thread for non-political conspiracy stories and mysteries?

Normally I avoid clickbait like I avoid writing PDRs on time but I clicked on this one below and was really fascinated by it. I know the art of this stuff is to dangle just enough tantalizing information infront of someone that they want to click 'next' and a lot of the time the stories are bullshit but doing a sliver of research some of the points in this story seem to have some truth to them.

Denver Airport, USA.
[ link from the article https://www.therichest.com/shocking/15-facts-about-the-denver-airport-conspiracy/  ]
[ another similar article from business insider, less sensationalist ]

Lots of questions surrounding this place and some strange happenings.
-There doesn't seem to be a logical reason why it was built or why it was so huge.
-14 commercial aircraft spontaneously had their windshields shattered 10 years ago that is still unexplained.
-Lots of suggestions that there is an underground complex with a super expensive automated luggage system and tunnels.
-Obama was coincidentally in the area back in 2012 when that earth destroying asteroid passed closeby.




Some of the artwork is pretty strange and very apocalyptic.

The kid holding the bent sword center-right sorta looks like Baron Trump  :Tin-Foil-Hat:




30 foot tall evil-*** looking horse (which killed the creator) that people coming in to and leaving the airport see.



In any case found it pretty interesting to spend a few minutes reading.  Not nearly as interesting as the The Dyatlov Pass incident though.







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Offline Good2Golf

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2018, 11:22:13 »
The artwork is the weirdest part, everything else sounds like a good story of "infrastructure conveniently having gone amiss"....   ;)

Offline BeyondTheNow

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2018, 19:18:16 »
I have to admit that I find a lot of conspiracy theories intriguing. While some make my eyes roll until they hurt, there are the ones that really cause one to pause. I think I enjoy some of them simply because it’s no secret that things go on which the general public will never be privy to within many facets of society. Period. It’s interesting hearing the conclusions that certain groups come to based off little/inaccurate/here say/whathaveyou information and then there’s the odd time where the conclusions/conspiracy theories actually make sense.

I first caught wind of the Denver Airport strangeness on a television program a few years ago.

The Dyotkav Pass has long since been a favourite, as the explanations given to blow the situation off as something mundane never seem to cover all the instances of damage, injury, environmental irregularities, etc. I like mysteries. I like things that leave one curious. ‘Keeps life interesting I suppose.

There’s a YouTube channel I like to visit from time to time which examines various conspiracies. Some weird, some just plain stupid, some mysterious, some really funny, some interesting, etc. Each segment starts off with the British narrator outlining what the conspiracy is and why the conspiracists believe it. But then he switches gears, usually around halfway through, and explains the facts which go against the theory to disprove it. Despite some of the asinine topics, each episode is laid out intelligently. If you’re into this sort of thing, have a look. Some of them are done quite well. 

Alltime Conspiracies

https://m.youtube.com/user/AlltimeConspiracies
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Offline Happy Guy

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Offline coyote489

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2018, 19:49:24 »
Definitely nice to hear the other side of the story, that's a great article on the airport. Not a lot of articles or sources out there with adequate info to falsify these conspiracy claims. No matter how much you argue with some of the theorists you just can't win. They will always just say things like "that's what they want you to believe". I definitely believe in questioning everything but sometimes we tend to take it too far and come up with these bizarre stories (paranoia).
« Last Edit: January 01, 2018, 19:56:50 by coyote489 »
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Offline BeyondTheNow

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2018, 18:21:47 »
Well, I don’t know about the alien abduction theory(lol), but certainly interesting if true.

Primary link: http://www.thatsmags.com/shenzhen/post/16471/tales-from-the-chinese-crypt-did-3000-chinese-soldiers-truly-disappear-in-1939

Quote
...It should be pointed out right from the start that the disappearance of the soldiers is not related to the Nanjing Massacre that took place in 1937. The Nanjing siege was over and resolved by mid 1938, over a year earlier.

On December 9, 1939, during the horrors of the Japanese aggression against the Republic of China during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45), a newly-arrived battalion of Chinese soldiers was assigned to a two-mile stretch of foothills as reinforcements in the area of Nanjing. The commander of the battalion was colonel Li Fu Sien and the Chinese army was ordered to prevent the Japanese from getting out of the city

Several hours later 3,000 Chinese soldiers were gone without a trace. There were no signs of any battle and their guns were found stacked beside their cooking fire. With the exception of a handful of troops stationed at the bridge on watch, there was not another single soldier to be seen...

Quoted link: http://www.perfectedition.win/unexplained-nanking/
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Offline Loachman

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2018, 20:04:58 »
"The fact remains – 3,000 soldiers vanished into thin air".

Vanishing into thin air is a lot less plausible than mass voluntary release, given the Japanese Army's reputation for hospitality.

Offline Haggis

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2018, 12:39:35 »
One of the things I enjoy about working the evening shift is listening to all the bat-crap crazy conspiracy theory stuff on AM radio during the drive home.  (Shadow governments, UFOs and covert alien invasions, chemtrails and mind control, Jade Helm, gun confiscation, etc.)  Makes "The X-Files" seem more like a documentary than a drama series.
Train like your life depends on it.  Some day, it may.

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2018, 13:40:28 »
I checked Youtube last night for a "Flat Earth" demonstration of why the stars rotate differently across the sky at different latitudes, their rotation around celestial poles, and why we see different stars in Canada than Australia, for example.

I ended up getting dizzy watching this.  :stars:

https://youtu.be/kWsvHOyHMc8

Offline ModlrMike

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2018, 14:28:03 »
A video by p-brane  :facepalm:

Clearly you can make this sh!t up.
WARNING: The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher,smarter, faster and better looking than most people.
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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2018, 14:54:40 »
They put a lot of time and effort into it. And they made me google "crepuscular rays" :rofl:

More from p-brane:

The ISS is a hologram projected by a U2 spyplane
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 14:58:23 by Til Valhall »

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2018, 20:15:09 »
Dyatlov Pass incident


Quote
Search and discovery

Before leaving, Dyatlov had agreed he would send a telegram to their sports club as soon as the group returned to Vizhai. It was expected that this would happen no later than February 12, but Dyatlov had told Yudin, before his departure from the group, that he expected to be longer. When the 12th passed and no messages had been received, there was no immediate reaction, as delays of a few days were common with such expeditions. It was not until the relatives of the travelers demanded a rescue operation on February 20 that the head of the institute sent the first rescue groups, consisting of volunteer students and teachers.[11] Later, the army and militsiya forces became involved, with planes and helicopters being ordered to join the rescue operation.

On February 26, the searchers found the group's abandoned and badly damaged tent on Kholat Syakhl. The campsite baffled the search party. Mikhail Sharavin, the student who found the tent, said "the tent was half torn down and covered with snow. It was empty, and all the group's belongings and shoes had been left behind."[11] Investigators said the tent had been cut open from inside. Eight or nine sets of footprints, left by people who were wearing only socks, a single shoe or were even barefoot, could be followed, leading down toward the edge of a nearby woods, on the opposite side of the pass, 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) to the north-east. However, after 500 metres (1,600 ft) these tracks were covered with snow. At the forest's edge, under a large cedar, the searchers found the visible remains of a small fire, along with the first two bodies, those of Krivonischenko and Doroshenko, shoeless and dressed only in their underwear. The branches on the tree were broken up to five metres high, suggesting that one of the skiers had climbed up to look for something, perhaps the camp. Between the cedar and the camp the searchers found three more corpses: Dyatlov, Kolmogorova and Slobodin, who seemed to have died in poses suggesting that they were attempting to return to the tent.[11] They were found separately at distances of 300, 480 and 630 metres from the tree.

Searching for the remaining four travelers took more than two months. They were finally found on May 4 under four metres of snow in a ravine 75 metres farther into the woods from the cedar tree. These four were better dressed than the others, and there were signs that those who had died first had apparently relinquished their clothes to the others. Zolotaryov was wearing Dubinina's faux fur coat and hat, while Dubinina's foot was wrapped in a piece of Krivonishenko's wool trousers.

Investigation
A view of the tent as the rescuers found it on February 26, 1959: the tent had been cut open from inside, and most of the skiers had fled in socks or barefoot

A legal inquest started immediately after finding the first five bodies. A medical examination found no injuries which might have led to their deaths, and it was eventually concluded that they had all died of hypothermia. Slobodin had a small crack in his skull, but it was not thought to be a fatal wound.[13]

An examination of the four bodies which were found in May shifted the narrative as to what had occurred during the incident. Three of the ski hikers had fatal injuries: Thibeaux-Brignolles[13] had major skull damage, and both Dubinina and Zolotaryov had major chest fractures.[14] According to Dr. Boris Vozrozhdenny, the force required to cause such damage would have been extremely high, comparing it to the force of a car crash. Notably, the bodies had no external wounds related to the bone fractures, as if they had been subjected to a high level of pressure. However, major external injuries were found on Dubinina, who was missing her tongue, eyes, part of the lips, as well as facial tissue and a fragment of skullbone;[15] she also had extensive skin maceration on the hands. It was claimed that Dubinina was found lying face down in a small stream[16] that ran under the snow and that her external injuries were in line with putrefaction in a wet environment, and were unlikely to be related to her death.

There was initial speculation that the indigenous Mansi people might have attacked and murdered the group for encroaching upon their lands, but investigation indicated that the nature of their deaths did not support this hypothesis; the hikers' footprints alone were visible, and they showed no sign of hand-to-hand struggle.[11]

Although the temperature was very low, around −25 to −30 °C (−13 to −22 °F) with a storm blowing, the dead were only partially dressed. Some of them had only one shoe, while others had no shoes or wore only socks.[11] Some were found wrapped in snips of ripped clothes that seemed to have been cut from those who were already dead.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyatlov_Pass_incident
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Offline Halifax Tar

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2018, 21:02:29 »
I’ve read some on the Dyatlov Pass Incident.  It’s a pretty fascinating story.  Thanks for the share.
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Offline Remius

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2018, 21:13:17 »
I’ve read some on the Dyatlov Pass Incident.  It’s a pretty fascinating story.  Thanks for the share.


So have I.  The best explanation is the avalanche one. While they slept.  Hit by an avalanche they escaped, some obviously injured.  They made a run for it fearing another one hence the lack of clothes on some.  Hypothermia ends up claiming them.

The end.
Optio

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2018, 21:27:45 »

So have I.  The best explanation is the avalanche one. While they slept.  Hit by an avalanche they escaped, some obviously injured.  They made a run for it fearing another one hence the lack of clothes on some.  Hypothermia ends up claiming them.

The end.


Quote
Evidence contradicting the avalanche theory includes:

The location of the incident did not have any obvious signs of an avalanche having taken place. An avalanche would have left certain patterns and debris distributed over a wide area. The bodies found within ten days of the event were covered with a very shallow layer of snow and, had there been an avalanche of sufficient strength to sweep away the second party, these bodies would have been swept away as well; this would have caused more serious and different injuries in the process and would have damaged the tree line.

Over 100 expeditions to the region were held since the incident, and none of them ever reported conditions that might create an avalanche. A study of the area using up-to-date terrain-related physics revealed that the location was entirely unlikely for such an avalanche to have occurred.

The "dangerous conditions" found in another nearby area (which had significantly steeper slopes and cornices) were observed in April and May when the snowfalls of winter were melting. During February, when the incident occurred, there were no such conditions.An analysis of the terrain, the slope and the incline indicates that even if there could have been a very specific avalanche that circumvents the other criticisms, its trajectory would have bypassed the tent. It had collapsed laterally but not horizontally.

Dyatlov was an experienced skier and the much older Alexander Zolotaryov was studying for his Masters Certificate in ski instruction and mountain hiking. Neither of these two men would have been likely to camp anywhere in the path of a potential avalanche.
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Offline Remius

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2018, 21:51:05 »
Interesting that you took only one part of a larger article.  Did you actually look at the sources used to back up that Wikipedia article entry?  Not exactly the best to be honest...

Look at citation 26.  A pseudo science site bordering on sci fi.

Citation 27.  The guy actually agrees it is likely an avalanche.  He did a quick google maps of the area today and thinks it doesn’t look like avalanche territory based on opinion only but found a brochure from that time warning people of avalanches. 

Sometimes the most mundane explanations are exactly what happened but somehow things like yetis and UFOs are more believable...
Optio

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2018, 22:27:06 »
I'm sticking to a either snow yeti or some kind of secret weapon. Avalanches are boring  :tsktsk:
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angus555

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2018, 22:46:02 »
I'm sticking to a either snow yeti or some kind of secret weapon. Avalanches are boring  :tsktsk:

Either Yeti or the flying Tic Tac landed on them.

Offline Remius

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2018, 06:44:11 »
I'm sticking to a either snow yeti or some kind of secret weapon. Avalanches are boring  :tsktsk:

Well, I can’t really argue against that.   8)
Optio

Offline NavyShooter

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2018, 08:59:08 »
Ever see the bit about the Titanic and Olympic being switched in an insurance fraud?

I'll dig it up when I get home tonight.

NS
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Offline mariomike

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« Last Edit: February 01, 2018, 09:36:47 by mariomike »

Offline Colin P

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2018, 15:39:44 »
Interesting that you took only one part of a larger article.  Did you actually look at the sources used to back up that Wikipedia article entry?  Not exactly the best to be honest...

Look at citation 26.  A pseudo science site bordering on sci fi.

Citation 27.  The guy actually agrees it is likely an avalanche.  He did a quick google maps of the area today and thinks it doesn’t look like avalanche territory based on opinion only but found a brochure from that time warning people of avalanches. 

Sometimes the most mundane explanations are exactly what happened but somehow things like yetis and UFOs are more believable...

Magic Mushrooms or other hallucinogenic drug?

Offline CanadianTire

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2018, 13:59:21 »
Here's a good one...Stardust Ranch.
https://alienranch.weebly.com/

The owner claims to have had numerous encounters with aliens; he's posted photos of wounds received while fighting them; he alleges they tried to abduct his wife but best of all he states that he's killed dozens with a samurai sword.

The undoctored photo at the top of the website is clearly a top quality, legit photo. Just Google Stardust Ranch to pull up various news articles from last year about him wanting to sell because of constant alien attacks.
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Offline BeyondTheNow

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2018, 22:16:49 »
With stories like these, I’m most interested in eventually seeing the full capabilities of these aircraft once they’re officially unveiled. Whether they’re private or military, who knows. But these types of accounts/stories remind me a little of how long sightings were dismissed and evidence ignored of the existence of Stealth Fighters/Bombers for quite a while before they were announced to the public. I find it very interesting. Aliens? No. An as-of-yet, unidentifiable, manmade flying object? Yes. Whose creation? We don’t know yet.

Quote
...Collectively these materials give us incredible insight not only into this incident, but also into how such an event is actually handled in real-time by those who are responsible for the safety of those in the air and those on ground below. What they don't offer is any sort of an explanation for what happened on that fall evening. But really, the fact that all those involved, from air traffic controllers, to Air Force radar operators, to airline pilots, and even special FAA officials tasked with responding to all types of out of the ordinary incidents that occur in the sky on a daily basis seem just as puzzled with this event as we are makes the story all that much more intriguing...

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/18473/faa-recordings-deepen-mystery-surrounding-ufo-over-oregon-that-sent-f-15s-scrambling
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Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Interesting conspiracy stories (non-politics)
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2018, 19:30:34 »

So have I.  The best explanation is the avalanche one. While they slept.  Hit by an avalanche they escaped, some obviously injured.  They made a run for it fearing another one hence the lack of clothes on some.  Hypothermia ends up claiming them.

The end.

A few years ago the Fortean Times had an article about the Dyatlov Pass incident. I'm pretty sure I still have the magazine and if I can find it I will post their findings.
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