Author Topic: Survival Living  (Read 2841 times)

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Offline AbdullahD

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Survival Living
« on: January 17, 2018, 14:18:33 »
Just curious if y'all take prepping into consideration when buying or building? I am in no way a doom and gloom prepper, but i do prep from a position of preparing for natural disasters.. ie wildfires, snowstorms, flooding etc and my wife and i keep these things in mind when looking at houses... just wonder how everyone else handles it.

We consciously avoid any house in a flood plain or a possible avalanche area etc. We are currently looking at a plot of land and thinking about buying and holding till we can build.. then possibly building out of ICF to try and mitigate wildfire risks (with our own drilled well and fireplace for heat etc), not to mention the other benefits of icf ie territory denial etc (albeit beefed up frames would be needed lol).

Grew up in a wood fire heated house that lost power once a year or so due to storms..but just curious how much stock you guys put into it when y'all build/buy/dream... and your thoughts

Just musing aloud before I get to work
Abdullah

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2018, 16:10:22 »
IIRC, you live near Kamloops.

I would put wildfire mitigation measures top mind. Reduce the fuel load on your land; metal roof; fire retardant siding; independent water supply, not dependent on BC Hydro to work; exterior sprinkler ssystem you can quickly rig up.

Wood heat is always good...

Offline AbdullahD

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2018, 16:21:32 »
IIRC, you live near Kamloops.

I would put wildfire mitigation measures top mind. Reduce the fuel load on your land; metal roof; fire retardant siding; independent water supply, not dependent on BC Hydro to work; exterior sprinkler ssystem you can quickly rig up.

Wood heat is always good...

You were right I was in kamloops (good memory), new job has me working for CNR in Smithers now.

Totally forgot about metal roofing, listening to rain on a metal roof is something else, it puts me to sleep stat lol.

Looking at the forests around smithers and summer temperatures, it is very possible a good burn will happen up here relatively soon too

Offline Til Valhall

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2018, 16:26:06 »
I would put wildfire mitigation measures top mind. Reduce the fuel load on your land; metal roof; fire retardant siding; independent water supply, not dependent on BC Hydro to work; exterior sprinkler ssystem you can quickly rig up.

None of those things will do SFA for a genuine wildfire if you live in the woods.

GTFO and insurance is your best bet, unless you live on an island in the middle of a lake.

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2018, 16:46:46 »
None of those things will do SFA for a genuine wildfire if you live in the woods.

GTFO and insurance is your best bet, unless you live on an island in the middle of a lake.

I am not suggesting he stay during the fire. But, if you do nothing, your place will burn for sure. Those are simple things that can make the difference in your house surviving, or not.

Offline Til Valhall

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2018, 17:00:01 »
I am not suggesting he stay during the fire. But, if you do nothing, your place will burn for sure. Those are simple things that can make the difference in your house surviving, or not.

It depends on where you live. If it's in the middle of a concrete and asphalt jungle, it's obviously better off than a place surrounded by trees and dense forest. After seeing the destruction around Fort McMurray, I'm skeptical of any kind of these fireproofing marketing gimmicks.

Your recommendations are better to defend against the idiots next door, not a real wildfire.

Even if you had a house made out of fire resistant material, I'd bet there would be an insurance claim for all the warping and scorched material that would happen from a
wildfire. At that point, you're probably just saving the insurance company some money. IMO, I wouldn't do that.

 :cheers:
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 17:25:01 by Til Valhall »

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2018, 17:50:27 »
Sorry, but I fail to see how doing nothing is a better COA than doing something to improve your odds in a wildfire.

I am not underestimating the power of fire, but I would rather have a singed house than a smoking hole in the ground.

Offline Til Valhall

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2018, 17:56:38 »
Sorry, but I fail to see how doing nothing is a better COA than doing something to improve your odds in a wildfire.

I am not underestimating the power of fire, but I would rather have a singed house than a smoking hole in the ground.

I'd rather not live in a expensive pillbox.

But if you have one, I'd love to come over and check it out.  ;D

Speaking of metal roofs, I think they make a house look like a barn. But for some reason, I absolutely love the copper colour ones.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 18:00:06 by Til Valhall »

Offline AbdullahD

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2018, 18:07:16 »
Maybe I should clarify, I in no way, shape or form advocate people staying in a building if ANY logical means of escape exist, period end of story. My realistic plan is to gtfo, not be some idiot staying trying to save his place.

As far as fires go and my extremely limited knowledge of wildfires, I understand that a lot of fires start due to ash falling or sage/grass etc burning catch the house on fire. So if you cut back the trees 50 ft or so and have an irrigation system that waters as per humidity? It would mitigate one factor and then set up simple sprinklers and leave it would help a lot. ICF is generally far more resistant due to being concrete then stick frame so realizing I could never pack all my heirlooms, pictures, sentimental things on short notice. This in my opinion gives me the best chance of keeping things money can't replace and if God forbid we somehow get cut off and isolated, the best chance of survival.

But this is simply one aspect lol im curious on thoughts is all
Abdullah

Offline NavyShooter

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2018, 19:10:10 »
I have, over the years, made some conscious decisions regarding home purchases.  I am now in my 4th home that I've purchased and lived in over the years, and some 'truisms' regarding home buying that I live by are as follows:


-Buy a house on a hill.  (flood protection, and good fields of fire in case of zombies)
-City water is a good thing - wells sometimes run dry and require regular testing
-Septic systems are also a good thing - just remember to pump them every 2nd year
-Living close to a body of water (lake across the street, or across the back yard) is a good thing.  You may lose city water, but a bucket or two will always fill a toilet.  Flushing will happen - sanitation is a good thing


The street I live on has a partial 'swamp' about half-way up.  If there was a forest fire, I'd grab saws, and start cutting a fire-gap in there.  I love trees, but they'll grow back. 

I have a water pump, and a generator, and I'd be highly likely to have a pre-wet system arranged for the roof of my house to reduce the likelihood of a fire catching hold by cinders.


Perfect solution?  No.  Better than nothing?  Yes. 

Would I be deserting my home in face of a brush or forest fire?  It depends.  If I have an hour's worth of warning, probably not.  If I don't have an hour....then probably yes.


I will note that I have a series of 'go lists' made up.

I have the 'grab-n-go' ie clothes on the back + family + pets + car + wallet and GO.

I have the 5-minute - above plus cash/silver/gold from safe, passports, shave kits, change of clothes - GO

I have the 15 minute - above plus food for several days + wedding albums + backup HDD + etc

I have the 60 minute, and a 2 hour pack list.

What to grab if you have to go....because in that moment, you won't remember it all.  List the essentials, and each list is cumulative.

Bear in mind, I do live within 1000 feet of a railroad line, so an emergency due to a spill/crash is possible, so a drop-the hat EVAC is a possibility.


In most situations though, my preference would be to stay. 

Insert disclaimer statement here....

:panzer:

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2018, 19:20:20 »
Just a true story here that puts things in perspective:

In the late 1970's, there was a British multi-millionaire who decided he wanted to "retire" from all the problems and danger of our existence - so to speak. He commissioned a research by a university professor to find him the least dangerous place to live on earth.

They found him a place, solid rocky land, completely out of any expected nuclear war or fallout areas, a place with no seismic activity, no volcanic activity, no recorded hurricanes, twisters, large forest fires, heavy lightning, no recorded flooding and no recorded civil unrest. In short, the safest place on earth.

So he got an architect and an engineer to design and build him a solid, no maintenance beautiful large residence that would be basically fireproof and capable of resisting nature at its worst.

He was just about to move into it in 1982 when ... the Argentinian armed forces invaded the Falklands and flattened his home.

Moral of the story: When your number comes up , there's nothing you can do.  ;D

By the way, nice to see you back Abdullah.

Offline FSTO

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2018, 20:13:34 »
Maybe I should clarify, I in no way, shape or form advocate people staying in a building if ANY logical means of escape exist, period end of story. My realistic plan is to gtfo, not be some idiot staying trying to save his place.

As far as fires go and my extremely limited knowledge of wildfires, I understand that a lot of fires start due to ash falling or sage/grass etc burning catch the house on fire. So if you cut back the trees 50 ft or so and have an irrigation system that waters as per humidity? It would mitigate one factor and then set up simple sprinklers and leave it would help a lot. ICF is generally far more resistant due to being concrete then stick frame so realizing I could never pack all my heirlooms, pictures, sentimental things on short notice. This in my opinion gives me the best chance of keeping things money can't replace and if God forbid we somehow get cut off and isolated, the best chance of survival.

But this is simply one aspect lol im curious on thoughts is all
Abdullah

Fire is a part of the natural cycle of forests and grasslands. During the spring when the ground is still wet but the underbrush has more or less dried out is the time that the forest service should be doing prescribed burns to get rid of the trash. The massive wildfires of late are a result of decades of a too successful program fighting forest fires.

Offline AbdullahD

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2018, 21:21:49 »
@navy I have to admit you are far better planned out then I am, we have two grab boxes one of documents and one of camping gear/food.. from there it is a mess, most of my money is tied up in the electronic world which is a huge flaw. I want to get to a point where I have $1000 split between my wife and I in 20s in case of the electronic world not being accessible for gas food etc.

Also now working for the railway, I will not live close to the rail. I far prefer travelling by rail now, then by car, far safer in my opinion, far more efficient for transporting goods then transport. Heck even as a stock I hold a bunch of cn stock due to how attractive it is for my money.. but the fact is something *could* or *may* happen and if my house is to close.. goodbye. (If anyone wants my opinion on cnr as an investment let's do another thread, LONG term I'm going to be holding a big chunk)

@fsto preaching to the choir mate, I have the exact same view.

@Obgd aye mate when my number comes up and it is over for me, i will go and hopefully with a shred of dignity.  But until then I'll continue fighting as I can :)

Offline dapaterson

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2018, 21:24:19 »
You're amplifying financial risk, though: anything happens to CNR and it's both your job and savings (including pensions, depending on their structure) at risk.

Talk to Nortel workers about how that can turn out...
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2018, 10:31:56 »
Thinking about reducing the risk in your area is good, for you fire, for me it was flooding. Once that is done as much as you can, look at water sources, collect rainwater for mundane tasks and know where there are water sources nearby, have a way to clean it. Cooking, an outdoor barbecue is a good idea with 2x20lb tanks. I keep my pantry full and stock of food and water in the garage. I cycle that stock and try to buy stuff that I will use regularly. Ration packs are expensive and don't last long, but are good for the first 24hrs while your trying to get your crap together. 

Offline Larry Strong

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Re: Survival Living
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2018, 19:09:03 »
« Last Edit: January 18, 2018, 19:11:37 by Larry Strong »
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