Author Topic: To Work or Not to Work  (Read 2603 times)

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Offline GermanWolf

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To Work or Not to Work
« on: January 30, 2018, 19:34:02 »
So I wanted to share a question with everyone, and hopefully come up with a good title for this post while I write it  ::) .

I am currently in my last semester of university (almost done, I can literally taste it). So far my application process has been going really well, and apart from a few confusions as to what forms to fill out when I have no complaints. However, once I finish university and am allowed to take my interview (as the completion of my degree is a requirement for the position), I still expect the application process to take anywhere from a few months to another year.

Is it seen as uncommitted or even disrespectful to go seek another job in that time period? I don't think I would have the funds to just wait for an indiscriminate amount of time to potentially be rejected in the end, as MP is a very competitive position as is. I am currently training to become a security guard, which I was thinking would be a good job to hold in the mean time as it is sort of related experience (unless of course I am seen as being uncommitted).

What do you all think? Should I just sit around and wait for a few months after university in case the recruitment process continues at the pace it has so far, or should I go find a temporary job for the time being?

Thanks  ;D

Recruiting Center: Ottawa
Regular/Reserve: Regular
Officer/NCM: NCM
Trade Choice 1: Military Police
Trade Choice 2:
Trade Choice 3:
Application Date: May 13th, 2017
First Contact: May 18th, 2017
CFAT: Passed, May 24th, 2017
Medical: Passed, Sep. 28th, 2017
Interview: Passed, April. 24th, 2018
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Offline mariomike

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2018, 19:37:18 »
I don't think I would have the funds to just wait < snip >

Sounds like you answered your question.  :)

As always, Recruiting is your most trusted source of up to date official information.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2018, 10:03:01 by mariomike »

Offline Brihard

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2018, 19:40:07 »
That's a no brainer. Get a job. It's totally normal to leave a job when something better comes at. You're probably not going to get anything great fresh out of university anyway, despite what you might have been led to believe. The real work starts when you graduate, and then it's a long slog to land something good. When something better comes up, generally, you take it. If the other job wants to keep you they can offer you compensation and opportunities competitive with your better option. You don't really owe an employer anything other than what the law requires.
Pacificsm is doctrine fostered by a delusional minority and by the media, which holds forth the proposition it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

Offline BeyondTheNow

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2018, 19:48:50 »
So I wanted to share a question with everyone, and hopefully come up with a good title for this post while I write it  ::) .

I am currently in my last semester of university (almost done, I can literally taste it). So far my application process has been going really well, and apart from a few confusions as to what forms to fill out when I have no complaints. However, once I finish university and am allowed to take my interview (as the completion of my degree is a requirement for the position), I still expect the application process to take anywhere from a few months to another year.

Is it seen as uncommitted or even disrespectful to go seek another job in that time period? I don't think I would have the funds to just wait for an indiscriminate amount of time to potentially be rejected in the end, as MP is a very competitive position as is. I am currently training to become a security guard, which I was thinking would be a good job to hold in the mean time as it is sort of related experience (unless of course I am seen as being uncommitted).

What do you all think? Should I just sit around and wait for a few months after university in case the recruitment process continues at the pace it has so far, or should I go find a temporary job for the time being?

Thanks  ;D

You need to sustain yourself in the meantime. You don’t have the job yet—There’s no guarantee you will. It’s up to you what type of employment you seek in the interim and it’s also up to you what you choose to disclose in the interview. (ie. when they ask you what your long term goals are/where you see yourself in x number of years, etc. So the types of questions that almost every future employer asks during an interview...)

I needed to fill a gap between closing down my own business and getting my offer. I knew it was coming, it was just a matter of when. So I told my then-employer up front in the interview what my plans were. I still got the job. However, it’s obviously understandable that some will face the dilemma of worrying whether being honest will cost them a position. Again, it’s totally up to you. I wasn’t invested in the outcome of the interview, so I was fine either way.
"Stop worrying about getting back to who you were before it all went wrong. To heal is to understand that the person you've since become is the one who's most capable of doing whatever it is you were put here to do."~SR

Online garb811

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2018, 19:50:34 »
I concur with the rest, get a job, you've got to eat, pay rent and all that.  There is nothing to be gained by "showing" the desire to join by putting yourself into financial stress, and it just might work against you if the debts start racking up, you start missing payments, bill collectors start calling...

Online kratz

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2018, 19:59:48 »
Advice that has been posted before, "The CF does not owe you a job".

You need to have a life before applying, while waiting and after you have been accepted or rejected.
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Offline Living the Dream

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2018, 14:00:36 »
Hi GW,

I can see the ethical dilemma here, and I'd, personally, hate to be in a situation where I am asked to sign an employment contract with someone who believes in me, and then, bam! I had to quit in a couple months to pursue a career with CAF. Initially, I'd thought it would be a very low thing to do to anyone, and, heck, I still believe the same, but from a 3-year experience of going through the recruitment process, my perception has changed.

I learnt that even some of our most promising beginnings can be fragile at times. Obstacles that you cannot control will occur and things like that will happen. So my take on your question is to definitely, go to work, ride and live without worrying too much about the recruitment process. I mean do what the recruiters ask of you in a timely manner, maintain your comms., check in on the progress once in a while - overall, do the right thing, but don't expect anything to complete by a certain target date, or ever, because there is no such date.

I feel quite happy that I never put my life on hold, didn't miss out on that job opportunity, didn't refuse to commit to two years of volunteering with RCM-SAR in exchange for some kickass training or didn't hesitate to buy that new shiny motorcycle and ride the heck out of it. I just live my life to its fullest while letting the CAF application to unfold naturally. When my time comes, I will be better a trained, happier and more experienced individual ready to pursue my next adventure.

My advice is to get yourself the best job you can and don't let that university degree to go stale.

Cheers!
« Last Edit: January 31, 2018, 14:22:18 by Living the Dream »

Offline GermanWolf

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2018, 21:35:55 »
Thank you all for the sound advice!! Gonna see what I can do with my degree while maybe staying in the city a little bit longer with my girlfriend
Recruiting Center: Ottawa
Regular/Reserve: Regular
Officer/NCM: NCM
Trade Choice 1: Military Police
Trade Choice 2:
Trade Choice 3:
Application Date: May 13th, 2017
First Contact: May 18th, 2017
CFAT: Passed, May 24th, 2017
Medical: Passed, Sep. 28th, 2017
Interview: Passed, April. 24th, 2018
MPAC:
Merit Listed:
Position Offered:
Swear In:
BMQ Begins:

Offline ExRCDcpl

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2018, 22:09:25 »
I assume you haven't done an mpac yet and if that's the case you also have to factor in how long it can take to get onto one.  If you walk into an mpac maybe a year from now and tell them you're unemployed and have made no effort to find work since school.....not exactly top notch marketing of yourself.

Just my .02

Offline Piece of Cake

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2018, 22:36:31 »
If I were in your position, I would tell the future employer during the hiring process that I have an active application with the CAF.  If the CAF were to offer me a position, I will have to leave this new job.  Most employers will appreciate your transparency.
Policy is more than black and white.  We need to not only understand the spirit of why a policy was written, but also how the policy affects people.

Offline EpicBeardedMan

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Re: To Work or Not to Work
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2018, 05:44:08 »
The visitors to read the content of this genus have not fully make up for the lack of explanation as to take part in.

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The military isn't really like a James Bond movie where you go for jet training in the morning and then underwater demolitions after lunch.