Author Topic: The "So You Want To Be A Pilot" Merged Thread  (Read 748467 times)

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Offline nULL

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #50 on: July 20, 2004, 22:41:59 »
http://www.airforce.forces.gc.ca/pilot/Pilot_e.pdf

clicking that link will allow you to download a PDF file that will have all the answers to your questions, in particular the entry plans.

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #51 on: July 21, 2004, 10:42:53 »
nULL is correct in his statements.  The height requirement is based on our fleet of ejection seat capable aircraft.  If your knees stuck out too much, you would lose them when departing the aircraft (aka ejecting).  If you are too short (4'11" is too short - sorry) you would never be able to touch the rudder pedals and therefore never be able to recover from an inadvertant spin - this has happened in the past, lessons learned.
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Offline Inch

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #52 on: July 21, 2004, 11:46:18 »
The height and other measurements are all based on the worst case scenario for all aircraft so to speak.  Leg length is important since if your legs are too long, as Zoomie said, you'll be a whole lot shorter if you eject.  On the flip side, if your legs are too short you won't reach the pedals in a chopper.  The pedals in the Harvard move quite a bit and I never had a problem reaching them, the Jet Ranger for basic helo school is a little different case, the pedals don't move as much and I had to use a cushion behind me to push me forward enough to reach them fully.  Of course there are limits to how many cushions you can use, 1 being the max. Sitting height is the same sort of thing, too tall = bad for ejection seats and Jet Rangers, too short is bad for ejection seats (your head won't rest on the head rest, which is very important) and you'll have trouble seeing out of the bigger airplanes. Even your reach is important, if you've got the inertia reel locked on your seat you won't be able to reach certain switches. So, being short isn't necessarily a problem flying jets since the seat and pedals move, but flying helicopters it's a problem since the seats don't move and the pedals are rather limited in the range of motion.  They only hire people that can do all jobs, it gives them better flexibility in sending you to the different communities after you finish Moose Jaw.

As for the CT156 Harvard II, it's got a Martin Baker Mk 16 ejection seat, the same one that's in the CT155 Hawk and will be in the Joint Strike Fighter.
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bobs28

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #53 on: July 22, 2004, 23:51:20 »
i was planning on going through rmc to get my degree to  become a pilot, does anyone know how tough it is to get in there, or is it based on what occupation you want to go into (like if they need one occupation you will get in easier)? are they still short on pilots, a year ago i was listening to the radio and the recruiter on a radio show said they were short something like 60 pilots out of the 90 they expected to join?

Offline hoser

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #54 on: July 23, 2004, 00:28:48 »
For what its worth, a couple guys posted on here that they were the only ones to pass aircrew selection, got offers for RMC, but those offers were for other trades.  From the CF's point of view, it takes 7 (I think?) years for an RMC applicant to get his/her wings, but 2 or 3 for a DEO applicant. 

I'll dig those posts up for you, if I can, because it'll probably mean more from their perspective, than from mine.

Offline hoser

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #55 on: July 23, 2004, 00:48:33 »
Here's one:  http://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,1596.0.html

Here's the other one, just for shits and giggles.  It doesn't help though, because I just directed him to the the first one. 
http://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,2090.0.html
« Last Edit: July 23, 2004, 00:52:47 by hoser »

Offline nULL

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #56 on: July 23, 2004, 01:20:33 »
It would take 7 years for a DEO applicant anyway. DEO's have to have a degree. Degrees usually take 4 years. Add 3 years to get wings, and there you go.

Offline hoser

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #57 on: July 23, 2004, 01:49:30 »
Right, which is why I said from the CF's point of view.  I can see how when they have a massive shortage of people, the DEO option is more appealing to them, so they probably rely on it more.

From the applicants perspective, there is no difference in timeline. 

Also, just to clarify,  I'm not trying to disuade bobs28 from applying for RMC, just trying to provide information so he keeps all his options open.  More or less I'm trying to point out that because there is a shortage, that does not mean that they're accepting lots of RMC/ROTP applicants for the Pilot trade.

bobs28

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #58 on: July 23, 2004, 02:21:30 »
hmm so i guess if i dont get accepted for pilot for rmc, but someother moc, i should just try and get a degree elsewhere and try for deo after?

Offline hoser

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #59 on: July 23, 2004, 03:09:12 »
Thats something you'll have to decide for yourself.  Be sure to talk to recruiters too.  There are pro's and con's to either choice, so you have to figure out whats best for you.

There are a lot of other great trades in the CF that you might excel at, so don't rule out the possibility of trying something else.  But it seems that people who want to be pilots REALLY want to be pilots, so this probably isn't a very convincing argument.

Offline Inch

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #60 on: July 23, 2004, 05:41:49 »
Don't forget you can always do an occupational transfer while you're at RMC provided you pass aircrew selection.   A certain number of pilot slots avail are for OTs from within the CF.   I know a few guys that joined for AERE or some other trade then switched to pilot. Another thing that hasn't been pointed out yet, the RMC route is 4 years of school, 2 years to get your wings, plus you owe 7 years after you get your wings, that's right boys and girls 13yrs.   The 7 years isn't negotiable, it's restricted release which means one way or the other you're staying in till that time is up.

So as long as you pass aircrew, you've always got the option of switching later. The point is don't give up.
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Offline Casing

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #61 on: July 23, 2004, 13:10:15 »
Just from prior posts on the subject, I do not think it is any easier to get into RMC depending upon what occupation you apply for.  RMC is extremely competitive--for all applicants.

Offline Code5

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #62 on: July 23, 2004, 21:03:22 »
This is just a curious question, since of course I do not possess the 20/20 vision (and thinks to astigmatiism its only getting worse..)
but i'm 6'2, how (un)comfortable would it be for me in a Griffon or a Seaking?


bobs28

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #63 on: July 23, 2004, 21:08:16 »
so im guessing getting into rmc is based on which program you choose, and how competitive it is?

Offline Inch

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #64 on: July 24, 2004, 08:16:54 »
Sheerin, you could be 7' tall and still be comfortable in the Sea King or Griffon, where you'd have the problem would be the Jet Ranger for basic helo school, I'm 5'7" and my head touched the roof. The tall guys have to slouch to be somewhat comfortable. It's definitely a tiny chopper.

Cheers,
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Offline Code5

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #65 on: July 24, 2004, 15:03:10 »
Thanks, I was kinda curious to know. 
How many hours did/would you have to log on the Jet Ranger, before moving on?

Offline Inch

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #66 on: July 24, 2004, 15:57:07 »
The basic helo school course is 92 hrs. You're allowed to have up to 10% or 9.2 hrs for review if you're having trouble or you fail a test. Also, sometimes there's air traffic control delays or weather or some other thing that delays your flight beyond the scheduled time but they don't count that against the req course time (we call it DNCO or Duty Not Carried Out).  My total from BHS including DNCO was 115.7 hrs, all Jet Ranger time.

Cheers
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Offline carpediem

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Current trg sequence for pilots
« Reply #67 on: August 10, 2004, 00:04:13 »
A pilot friend of mine has heard that the training sequence for new pilots has changed slightly recently. Instead of Second Language Training immediately following BOT and before Phase 1 Primary Flying it can now occur after Phase 2 Flying at an appropriate time.

Anyone currently in the system who has done this?
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Offline Born2Fly

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Re: Current trg sequence for pilots
« Reply #68 on: August 10, 2004, 00:27:57 »
I wouldn't be totally opposed to it, but I just wonder for the Pilots themselves... Doing both phases of flying training, and then before going to Phase III (Helos, Multi-Engine, or Jets), having to do 7 months of SLT. I know I would rather get on with Phase III training, rather than have to wait 7 months to start it.
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Offline pipstah

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Re: Current trg sequence for pilots
« Reply #69 on: August 10, 2004, 08:37:27 »
Well... its probably depend on what is your fist language because for my part, I will have to do the second language course right after my officer course because i'm from Quebec. Knowing how the army like the standardisation of everything my guess would be no but then again i dont know. English is the only language in aviation so all the french speaking person (like me) need to master it before going on those course to be able to do the communication in english while in the air and catching what the instructors are telling me. :warstory:
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Offline saintjoseph

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Re: Becoming a Pilot
« Reply #70 on: September 08, 2004, 00:49:55 »
My understanding is that at RMC, there is a set number of students they can push through in a given year, and those total number of seats are broken down and assigned MOC's based on the CF's requirements. So recruiters will act to fill those pilot seats that are available there first as these placements are paid for by the military already simply because they run the school regardless. If, like is the case for the last few years, they need many more pilots than there are pilot seats in RMC, they will act to fill them another way. Sure, DEO is cheaper for them, but they will, maybe, also send you to a civilian university. That was the case with me. I applied and was accepted after my second year at a civi-U and they sponsored me for the remainder of my education there. Although I ended up paying for a few years myself, I am happy about that now that I have heard just how difficult RMC can be.
So to those who are thinking of getting their degree and then applying DEO...think about applying part way through your degree...that way you can go to school, for free, and get paid, without all that daily inspection and military stuff that they go through at RMC.

CanadianPilot

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Re: The "So You Want To Be A Pilot" Merged Thread
« Reply #71 on: January 08, 2005, 01:00:32 »
Hello Everyone....My First post here.  Great Site!


So, I'm a Commercial Pilot-Fixed Wing.  300Hrs. 23 Years Old.  Live in Toronto.  College (3Yr Diploma) Education. 

I am not employed as a pilot, but run my own business right now.  I have a fair amount of free time, and would be interested in becoming a Pilot in the Reserves. 

Is this possible?

I have sent an e-mail to derbach.bg@forces.ca, but it comes back as undeliverable.
Look forward to your thoughts!



Cheers

CP


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Jet Thrust.com - The Aviation Network
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pilot_hopeful

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Re: The "So You Want To Be A Pilot" Merged Thread
« Reply #72 on: January 08, 2005, 01:14:49 »
In order to be a Pilot reg force or reserve, you have to be an officer. In order to be an officer you must have a degree from a recognised university.  The recruiter at 4900 yonge st told me civilian certification is worthless to the military.

drop in an ask the recruiters, its a big brown building across from the shepherd subway stop.

Rich

Offline Inch

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Re: The "So You Want To Be A Pilot" Merged Thread
« Reply #73 on: January 08, 2005, 07:31:36 »
There are very few pilot positions avail to reservists. TacHel being the most common. 400 Sqn in Borden and 438 Sqn in St Hubert are reserve Sqns, there are a few reg force positions there but it's mostly reservists. If you're interested in fixed wing, there's 402 Sqn in Winnipeg, but to give you a comparison of the experience they're looking for....I know a guy that got accepted to fly the Dash 8s at 402 Sqn, he had over 8500hrs and was the Capt on a CRJ for Air Canada. I think there's also some reserve positions in Trenton, but again, I have my doubts that they'll hire you with 300hrs of bug smasher time. Don't get me wrong, I have friends that had under 300hrs when they first flew the Herc, but they had gone through all the training in Portage, Moose Jaw and Portage again.

In addition to all this, you also have to pass the same aircrew medical that the rest of us do. So if you wear glasses, forget about it. If you have an irregular heart beat, forget about it.

Most reserve pilots that I know are retired reg force pilots. There's a very select few that are recruited off the street. The air reserve doesn't work the same way as the army reserve, one evening a week and one weekend a month kind of thing.

Cheers
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Offline Love793

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Re: The "So You Want To Be A Pilot" Merged Thread
« Reply #74 on: January 08, 2005, 07:39:06 »
In order to be a Pilot reg force or reserve, you have to be an officer. In order to be an officer you must have a degree from a recognised university.   The recruiter at 4900 yonge st told me civilian certification is worthless to the military.

drop in an ask the recruiters, its a big brown building across from the shepherd subway stop.

Rich


Check with your recruiter again.  There's a program that is solely for Civilian Pilots.  It's run in partnership with Canadore.  Also a 3 Yr program at a recognised community college is also acceptable for officers.
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