Author Topic: Sit-Ups  (Read 153497 times)

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Veteran`s son

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2003, 00:11:00 »
Thanks for the encouraging reply, Logistik; I appreciate it!  :)  

I really am trying to get into good physical shape and have made situps and pushups part of my everyday routine!

In the next week or two, I am going to start running and jogging because I want to apply and hopefully join the CF(Army) in 2004.  :)

Offline Mike Bobbitt

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #26 on: April 11, 2003, 07:33:00 »
Soldier in Waiting: You‘ve been warned.

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Offline Bert

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #27 on: April 11, 2003, 10:25:00 »
Veteran‘s Son >

I‘m not sure of your physical condition, but assuming you haven‘t done alot of running, I suggest you start out gradually.

If you haven‘t joined a fitness club, you may want to consider it.  Check out the elliptical trainers. Elliptical (sp?) trainers are good to improve cardiovascular fitness without the jarring and pounding you get from running.  Yet the elliptical trainers are not a replacement for running.

I‘d use the elliptical trainer for awhile to get used to exertion, tone the leg and foot tendons/muscles, and get the heart pumping.  

When you feel ready to start running, either outside or on the treadmill, make sure you have a good pair of running shoes (New Balance M587 might be a good choice but pricey)and use the CF EXPRESS jogging pamphlet as a guide.  Good info there.  The best way to improve VO2 is to run hard, fast, and and long as you can as PART of a training/running program.

Its good to start the running to find out if your feet are susceptible to pain and what sort of insoles or orthotics might be necessary especially if you‘re over 35.  Once in BMQ, likely you won‘t get a chance to experiment with different styles and levels of insoles.

Good luck.

Offline Bert

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #28 on: April 11, 2003, 10:59:00 »
Radiohead >
"I was also wondering if there a way to train for the step test as well."

I don‘t know if anyone addressed your question.
I‘m not a physcial trainer but I‘m going through the same thing you are.

I believe, and I say that again, I believe the CF step test is a set of three sessions of 3 minute duration of stepping on 3 level stairs.  Three sets of there minute stair stepping of three stairs. Why is that so tough to describe?  Each session is progressively faster timed to an audio beat you have to step to.  At the end of each step session, they take your pulse and estimate your V02 max.  If this is wrong, someone please correct me.

The stair step is different than running 2.4 kms.  It takes more physical strength than running moderately in the same amount of time and knees are stressed differently (more for strength than pounding).

The best way to deal with it is to balance your carido exercise with strength training.  Doing weights for the quads, hamstrings, calves, and the back are specific exercises for strengthening the legs.  I‘d put some focus on that.

The other is improving the cardio through various exercises to make sure your VO2 max is in a good range.  And thats about it.

Someone posted a link in here or you can search for "step tests cardio" on the ‘net for information and evaluation.  You could do you own step tests for practice or figure out where you could be on the VO2 cart.

I know when I go for my fitness test, if theres a step, Im gonna trip over it.  All the conditioning in the world won‘t stop the Maxwell Smart effect. They‘ll mark me as a jerk and stamp me as FAIL.     :crybaby:

Joel85

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #29 on: April 11, 2003, 23:55:00 »
Sorry for the derogatory reply. I guess I‘m just psyched about joining and gung ho. It wont happen again.

Go Army!!  :sniper:

Illucigen

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2003, 22:11:00 »
I agree. You must vary your training.

One, if you are really worried, buy a heart-rate monitor (roughly 100$, doubles as a watch). You will then ensure you are working in your proper cardiac zone.

No point in sprinting tons, as this is not aerobic, but anaerobic, and will do little for your cardio capacity. You need to be working between 70-80 of max, and a heart rate monitor will tell you this, as you are running.

You should be able to comfortably talk to someone next to you as you run, but it shouldnt be so easy that you dont have to think about regulating your breaths.

You can play with distances and speeds. Try and extend distance, and run outside, not indoors.

Offline Bert

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #31 on: April 13, 2003, 23:54:00 »
You‘re right in the respect to work the cardio you gotta fall within the 60% to 80% of your maximum heart rate.  Tons of sprinting won‘t help if you are training primarily for distance.  Its just a tool that can be used within a running program to quickly improve the VO2 range.

Depending on the workout, working consistantly at 60% to 80% of your maximum heart rate may not necessarily or significantly improve the VO2/cardio capacity.  Once the body adapts to the stress, the trainee only get slight improvement in the VO2 over time.  To improve the cardio, the trainee may have to employ techniques like wind sprint sets to push the body beyond what it has adapted to for periods of time.  The aerobic and anaerobic nature of VO2 has to be worked.  

For those of us recruits who are not in the best cardiovascular shape, its good to get some professional runnning advice.  It can save time and energy by getting into a efficient program quickly, especially if the application process happens to be six months or less.

Joel85

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #32 on: April 14, 2003, 01:30:00 »
I hate running. Period. But I love rollerblading and high-intensity mountain biking. I usually rollerblade 10km‘s at a time, same for biking. I find these activities WAY more interesting than running. I score a "very good" on the Tecumseh Step Test and can do the required amount of sit-ups and pushups. Will the fact that I don‘t run be negative for me?

Veteran`s son

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #33 on: April 14, 2003, 07:26:00 »
What is the Tecumseh Step Test please?

Offline kurokaze

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #34 on: April 14, 2003, 08:57:00 »
heh.. if you don‘t like running now, you will
by the time you finish basic  :D

You can probably get in with what you‘ve got now,
but just keep in mind that they aren‘t going to
do a step test for PT, it‘ll be running.

Duotone81

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #35 on: April 14, 2003, 15:59:00 »
Veteran‘s Son,

Here is a site which provides a description of the step test.

   http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/tecumseh.htm  

I think this test differs from the one CF adminsters in that it only has 1 step compared to the 3 that are used for CF step test. It aslo provides acceptable ranges for VO2. Illucigen stated in another thread that these values were fairly similar to CF‘s standards. Also you might want to consider, if you want to dish out the cash, getting a physical assesment done at your local gym. It might be cheaper if there is a college or university with an athletics department in your town. I can get the test done at my college for 10 bucks so I imagine they are not that expensive. The assesment will test your VO2, situps, chinups, pushups, grip test and body fat%. More or less the same test (from what i‘ve read) that you‘ll take at the recruiting centre. The advantage being that you‘ll know where you‘re at b4 you take the test that counts. And you might be able to get some free professional advice too.

I recently heard some good advice. It went something like this... "Train your mind, the rest will follow".

Good Luck

Illucigen

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #36 on: April 14, 2003, 18:50:00 »
Its fairly similar, except that as stated, the CF test is literally a set of stairs/steps... 3 of them to be exact.

For those who have already taken it, you really should have taken the time to ask the PSP staff when you failed what to do to improve. They are the experts after all, as they know what they are looking for.

If you haven‘t taken it, and are /really/ worried. get running. I ran every day for months, and pushed myself harder and harder. What I found works is if you run downtown, along a parkway or somewhere busy, with people/things to look at.. Passes the time if you hate running.

On basic, you‘ll have plenty of things to occupy your mind :-)

And if you are /really/ /really/ worried about the test, go see a trainer, and get them to give you tips, a program, etc.

Its nearly impossible for us to give you a detailed program without evaluating you, and Im not really qualified.

Polkovnik

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #37 on: April 14, 2003, 22:59:00 »
I must say after I read some of this stuff here, I understand why ur army is not as good  as it could be.

No offence, but I think if you are over 35 it is a bit too late to be joining the army.

About running
If you cannot run a  mile in 7 seconds at least you will be having a really hard time, I assure you.

Now try running the same mile in under 7 seconds with about 40 lbs of gear on you, in heavy boots and bad weather, that is more like reality now.

About strength
the simpliest way to find out how strong you are.
You must be able to lift at least 50 lbs
it would be best if you can do it repeatedly

Endurance
You should be able to work long hours without a break and little food and sleep,
in any weather


If you are a fatass, lay off the hamburgers
If you are lazy, get ready for work
If you have attitude, get ready to follow orders

Offline ~RoKo~

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #38 on: April 14, 2003, 23:06:00 »
A mile in 7 seconds? ****, I‘m not even close. I can‘t even do a 100 meters in 7 seconds.

ninty9

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #39 on: April 14, 2003, 23:24:00 »
No one can run 100M in 7 sec.  Donovan Bailey did it in 8.6 or something around there and that american did in a cople tenths of a second faster, let alone 7 seconds a mile...unless you could run as fast as the space shuttle...

I think he must mean 7 minutes / mile, which is much more reasonable and attainable by most people.

And i‘d really like to see someone run a mile with 40lbs of gear in under 7 minutes.  If you could do that, I would be very impressed.

Offline WB

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #40 on: April 14, 2003, 23:29:00 »
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About running
If you cannot run a mile in 7 seconds at least you will be having a really hard time, I assure you.

Now try running the same mile in under 7 seconds with about 40 lbs of gear on you, in heavy boots and bad weather, that is more like reality now.
Holy cow!! A 7 second mile?!?! You must be in that Army of God I‘m always hearing about!!  ;)

I did a bit of math converting KM to miles and figuring out what the minimum and superior scores for the fitness test would be. It roughly works out to a bare pass being 8 minute mile and superior pass being 6:50 (thats in my head, so correct me). However, I‘ve always been under the impression that these entry standards are the same regardless of the job you‘re applying for. If you‘re applying for infantry you‘ll have a rough time if you can just squeeze past the minimum standard (<----recruiter told me that).

Veteran`s son

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #41 on: April 14, 2003, 23:57:00 »
With regard to age, I believe that the age limit for applying to the CF is 52 years old, isn‘t it?   :)

Duotone81

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #42 on: April 15, 2003, 01:29:00 »
7 seconds/mile = 515 miles/hour.  :eek:  

LMAO. I don‘t even think BUD‘s is that tough.   :D

Offline kurokaze

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #43 on: April 15, 2003, 10:36:00 »
Running a 7 min/mile anywhere with 40lbs of gear
on your back is just asking for trouble.. better
make sure that gear tight Tight TIGHTLY secured!

A 7 minute mile is not impossible though even
BUD/S starts at 8:30 and works its way up to
7:30/mile.  I don‘t know where that figure is
coming from, but I would sure be interested in
knowing what army requires basic recruits to run
7 minute miles.

Veteran`s son

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #44 on: April 15, 2003, 19:21:00 »
What does BUD/S mean please?
   :confused:

Polkovnik

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #45 on: April 15, 2003, 19:34:00 »
Hahahaha, im sorry guys, I was thinking about something else at the time, I meant 7 minutes,

Although I thought you would understand that I meant minutes but oh well

Sorry

Polkovnik

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #46 on: April 15, 2003, 19:41:00 »
I do not think you all understood me correctly,

1. I meant 7 minutes
2. I did not say that it is a requirement in any army, what i meant was that if you can run a 7 minute mile you will be fine.

I think a 7 minute mile is nothing hard, I was doing low 6 when I was back in highschool.

By the way, what does the fitness test require

Offline Bert

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #47 on: April 15, 2003, 19:49:00 »
Polkovnik wrote >
"I must say after I read some of this stuff here, I understand why ur army is not as good as it could be.

No offence, but I think if you are over 35 it is a bit too late to be joining the army."

Have to admit Veteran‘s Son starts a good thread.
Polkovnik, after reading the stuff on this site, why do you think the army isn‘t as good as it could be?  I think your taking things way out of context.

For the next paragraph, the CF accepts all ages from about 18 to up to 55 yrs.  Yes, the average 35 yrs old isn‘t in the same physical category as the average 18 yr old. I‘d figure the physical requirments for the Army MOCs, infantry and armour as an example, are quite high.  Yet, MOCs in medical, electronics, datacomm, mechanics, more or less skilled labour are toned by education and experience.  An electronics technologist/recruit right out of college is less useful than that of someone with 10 or 15 years of experience.  CF MOCs, not just the in Army, requires skills now with more high-tech content and a good level of physical fitness.  In some MOCS, the CF looks hard for skills the recruit brings in and older recruits can have more background. Other MOCs may prefer younger enlistments.

Offline ~RoKo~

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #48 on: April 15, 2003, 20:31:00 »
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Although I thought you would understand that I meant minutes but oh well
Yeah, we knew, but we where just buggin yah..  :)

DnA

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #49 on: April 16, 2003, 00:23:00 »
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What does BUD/S mean please?

the BUD/S that I know of is a US Navy school
Basic
Underwater
Demolition