Author Topic: Sit-Ups  (Read 155058 times)

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Offline WB

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #50 on: April 16, 2003, 16:45:00 »
BUD/S is the for US Navy SEALs.

Duotone81

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #51 on: April 16, 2003, 19:34:00 »
From situps to 7 second miles to seals, this thread has it all.  :D

Offline Marauder

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #52 on: April 23, 2003, 02:39:00 »
Don‘t forget the newbie flaming the other newbies. That‘s always classic and good for a guffaw.
"Lions mustn't concern themselves with the opinions of lambs."

Offline GregC

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #53 on: April 24, 2003, 21:34:00 »
hey guys.... was hoping you guys could completely clarify the step test. I saw the previous link that showed the one step tecumseh test, but as has been previously stated the CF uses three. So are there simply a small set of three stairs in front of you, and you go straight up and then backwards? It seems to me that going backwards like that with any speed could be very difficult/dangerous, so if anyone can confirm or deny my understanding I would be very appreciative, as it would aid in my current training. I think I‘ll be fine, I train on a monstrous set of switchback stairs, totalling a menacing 260 steps!   :eek:
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rolandstrong

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #54 on: April 25, 2003, 13:39:00 »
The step test is an ineffective test in determining a VO2 max. Firstly it is not performance based (which is the only way a VO2 max can be clearly identified). I can run 2.4 km in 11:15 (as I did the police test), did 35 pushups, 45 situps and had a grip test of 95. i should mention that I am also 34 years old an returning to the forces after a few years. They told me I failed the test. i refuted the result, raised ****  at CFRC, and they allowed me a re-test (3 days after i did the first). I passed the test with no problems on the second round. I do a lot of heavy weights, and run 4 times a week. The tester told me that body weight affects the VO2 max calculation, as does your age.

If I was to make a recommendation I would cahallenge any time

Cpt. Kap

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #55 on: April 25, 2003, 15:28:00 »
Polkovnik, first off because I‘m over 35 (just)doesn‘t mean I can no longer do the job. I am the only member of my BMQ to score 60 out of 60 on weapon qualification staff included.

Begin Rant  I think you need to ask yourself the question - who would you rather have as fire team partner? A 17 year old kid shaking in his shoes or a person twice that age with the determination to gut out the physical requirements to be a soldier and with the motivation to get the job done.

People in general tend to discount the Reserve soldier because he or she can walk away at any time. The point is  we don‘t . My course signed on to work 5 days per week at our civie side jobs and then 3 weekends on one weekend off for BMQ. Two days off every 28 gets tiring but still people keep on coming back for more.   :fifty:   Thus ends the rant

Offline Danjanou

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #56 on: April 25, 2003, 19:54:00 »
Cpt Kap-
"who would you rather have as fire team partner? A 17 year old kid shaking in his shoes or a person twice that age with the determination to gut out the physical requirements to be a soldier and with the motivation to get the job done."

Add a few years experience, military or just life in general to that equation too.

Well said.
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Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #57 on: April 25, 2003, 22:05:00 »
"I must say after I read some of this stuff here, I understand why ur army is not as good as it could be.
No offence, but I think if you are over 35 it is a bit too late to be joining the army."
LOL


I‘ve watched super runners carry a rucksack for a day and a half and start to shut down beause they were tired and it was heavy, their muscles were sore. I watched really built muscular soldiers go down after a 2 km webbing march because they dehydrated, too much createan in their system. Ya sure someone can run a mile in 6 minutes in highschool, their also kids and not grown men.


It‘s safe to say our military has a brutal level of physical fitness. Everyone has seen soldiers who are, and i don‘t mean to be hateful, disgusting to look at. Sure their great guys. Would i try and pull them out of a burning vehicle? Of course. COULD i? Even at 185 pounds and a little heavy up top myself, not a chance. Physical fitness is something that can be taught and worked at. When people get out of control they can be brought back down to a normal level.  As much our PT is a problem i think even MORE of a concern is the mentality and to be honest, stupidity of people passing battleschool or getting shuffled around regiment to regiment like a hot potato.
When you have a 3 year private confuse a major general with another private, try and bum a smoke off him and then proceed to ***** for having to do a garbage sweep because he "forgot" to show up to work in uniform we need to sit back and say sure this kid can run a mile in 6 and a half minutes  and boy look at him pump off those push ups but what the h*ll are we doing putting a rifle in his hands with live rounds?
We need better PT. (My personal PT is pretty bad in itself, something im working on) but we REALLY need to quit hiring bums off the street who can‘t speak english (or french) and laugh at their section commanders because they know we can‘t kick them out of the army with out a practical act of god.

oops, i just ment to laugh at the guy who thinks someone with 35 years of life experence (opposed to that of a 17 year old) isn‘t ideal for the military and being in the real world.
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Polkovnik

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #58 on: April 27, 2003, 00:11:00 »
In my opinion 17 is too young for the army,

what i meant was 35 is a bit too late to be >joining< the army, that doesnt go for everyone ofcourse, everybody is different, if you have the energy and the ambition go for it.

I dont think that Canada‘s army has tough physical requirements,
each army has its own strategy and way of making its soldier, thats why all armies are somewhat different.

Offline WB

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #59 on: April 27, 2003, 02:17:00 »
Polkovnik, if you don‘t mind my asking...

...Have you ever served in the CF? Have you ever served in another nation‘s military?

You‘re saying some controvertial stuff, and I‘m curious as to how you‘ve formed your opinions.

Offline Bert

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #60 on: April 27, 2003, 11:12:00 »
In addition to Fusaki‘s post,
Polkovnik wrote, "I dont think that Canada‘s army has tough physical requirements".

What leads you to think the CAF doesn‘t have tough
physical requirements?  What are you using for comparasions or background information?
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Offline radiohead

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #61 on: April 27, 2003, 11:22:00 »
"what i meant was 35 is a bit too late to be >joining< the army, that doesnt go for everyone ofcourse, everybody is different, if you have the energy and the ambition go for it."

Well I think anyone who joins and is not out of high school or college, is willing to give up a lot when they join the CF.  And I think says alot about what type of person they are.  I‘m 33 this what I want, this the career I want.  I think once I‘m in I‘ll make a much better solier than that guy out of school who just doesn‘t take it seriously because they have no idea where their life going and the military is only a spot on that road for them.  Of course not everyone, just out school is like that.  But sure many are. Yes someone who is 20 most likely is in better shape, but so what.  I can still do that job and do it well. Life experience is very important.

"I dont think that Canada‘s army has tough physical requirements,"

  These requiremenets are for getting into the CF.  Your going to basic and they will make you better.  If you put the bar too high, then no one will get in. Look at society, schools are cutting back on gym time, parents drive their kids everywhere, and they eat junk and spend more time inside than out. The point of basic is that you start as a civi and become a soldier, and they push you too that higher level.  You can‘t pass Infantry school is you just meet the physical requirements for getting into basic.

Veteran`s son

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #62 on: April 27, 2003, 11:48:00 »
Speaking for myself, I am sure that I am not as physically fit as most people!

However, I will be going to the gym (starting tomorrow)to get in the best physical shape that I can(along with pushups/situps daily)!

I may be over 35 years old but if I am fortunate enough to be sworn into the CF Reserves, I will work really hard to be the best soldier that I can be!    :)    

I would consider it an honor and be grateful to serve and wear the uniform of a CF Reservist!

One of the reasons that I want to join is in memory of my Dad who served 31 years as a Regular Force member of the Canadian Forces. I would be proud to serve in the CF as Dad did for many years!    :cdn:    

However, I want to join for myself also as joining the CF would be an excellent opportunity to learn a trade and discipline to help me be the the best soldier that I can.

If I try my very best to be successful as a CF applicant and then member, my best is all that I can do, right?

Polkovnik

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #63 on: April 27, 2003, 13:39:00 »
I have many friends in Canadian army, some of them are in reserves some work part time. Some are in military college. I know a few guys who work in U.S army.

I have not served in the Canadian army, but I am thinking about it,

I have 2  brothers, one of them is in the Russian interior army (OMON), they are contract soldiers, my other brother  was a marine, but then he had an injury and was signed off. My father was a colonel in the soviet army.
I have been 2 years in Russian army, but i had no choice whether  to go or not, then I worked in Germany for a while.

Thats why I‘m saying that all armies are different,  

I heard somewhere that army will pay for University education, but then I have to work for 4 or 5 years in the army, is this true?

rolandstrong

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #64 on: April 28, 2003, 11:38:00 »
I think that a person in their 30‘s and 40‘s make fine reserve soldiers. Remember, the militia is a citizen army first and formost, and does not have the same military responsibilities that their reg force counterparts have. Deployments are voluntary, and training is done secondarily to civilian commitments.

That being said, I find a great deal of reservists at all ages less active than they should be. Quite frankly, some of the fittest reservists that I know are in their 30‘s right now, but this is just my experience.

Offline Bert

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #65 on: April 28, 2003, 12:18:00 »
True, but everything has to be put into context.
Polkovnik‘s comments from my understanding reflect the whole CAF, every MOC, not just BMQ, the infantry or distinquishing beween regs or reserves.

One wouldn‘t expect a sailor, an airman, or a cook to have the same physical fitness level as a light infantry parachutist.  Some MOCs require specialized or advanced skill sets.  As an example made earlier, you can‘t expect a 19 year old ATIS tech to have the same experience as a 30 year old with prior civilian experience.  The CAF needs both physical and skill set capability found in all age groups as explained to me by the Recruiter.

rolandstrong

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #66 on: April 28, 2003, 16:16:00 »
Actually, referring to his original question on the previous page, he is referring to the army.

rolandstrong

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #67 on: April 28, 2003, 16:23:00 »
Veteran‘s Son, I think you should just keep pursuing the reserves. Don‘t get so caught up in what tests and stuff need to be done, just do it. As you go through the process, you will understand it better, become stronger, and enjoy it more. My buddy, a reservist sergeant for many years, 37 years old, even tried out for JTF2. It‘s the path that counts, and you are not too old to do it. Another friend of mine joined the combat engineers at 39 as a NCM Sapper, is still there after 3 years, and at 42 parades and goes on exercises regularly, no problems. A fitness program will certainly help out, but they are not looking for a marathoner.

Hang in there and keep going.

Veteran`s son

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #68 on: April 28, 2003, 18:26:00 »
Thanks for the encouraging reply, Roland, as it is appreciated!  :)

Veteran`s son

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #69 on: May 04, 2003, 22:34:00 »
When doing the CF style of pushups, your hands have to be under your shoulders, I believe.

When I start the pushups, my hands are under my shoulders but I cannot keep them under my shoulders during all of the pushups.

Does anyone have suggestions that would be helpful?  :)

Offline Bert

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #70 on: May 04, 2003, 23:51:00 »
It might be, maybe you‘ll correct this assumption, that the push-up style is too hard on your triceps.  Do you find the "hand under the shoulders" to be awkward and you move your hands out to put less strain on your triceps?  Moving your hands out balances the stress from the triceps to the shoulders and outer chest area.
Unfortunately, the CF likes the tricep style it seems.

By keep practicing the tricep or CF style of push-up, you‘ll improve slightly over time.  What might help is going to the gym and performing shoulder and chest exercises.  Doing the bench press, inclined bench press, the shoulder press, lateral side shoulder raise, and the lat pull down builds the muscles in the push-up area.  You may not want to over-train the tricep too much and risk a tendon pull at the elbow.  

Try to find a weight that you can perform all the exercises above 8 to 11 repetitions.  Find another weight that you can do the same exercises 4 - 7 repetitions.  The less repetitions the more weight.  

As a suggestion, do the exercises for one week at 8 - 11 reps and start at 3 sets each.  Next week do 4 - 7 reps at 4 sets each.  Next week after do the exercises at 8- 11 reps at 5 sets each.  Next two weeks do the same with 4 - 7 reps at 5 sets.
Go back to week one and keep the cycle.  You may want to do this about 3 to 4 times a week.
Likely you‘ll be using more weight each cycle.  Then try the push-ups.  You‘ll find you‘ll do them faster with more repetitions. It may take  two cycles to see a significant improvement and it takes time and patience.

These weight exercises could be part of an overall fitness program and I‘m just offering it as an example.  There are weight lifting programs designed for a full body workout that work the legs, back, abdomin (sp), mid-upper back, shoulders, chest, biceps and triceps.  All muscle groups need focus and I‘d suspect will be used during BMQ lifting, carrying, running, and PT.

Illucigen

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #71 on: May 06, 2003, 10:35:00 »
Do pushups every day. Once you get more used to them, do them once in the morning, once at night. The stress isnt /that/ great to require rest.

Once you can no longer do the pushup with your full wait, go onto your knees and keep going (sounds babyish, but you will only really be able to do a few more, but these few will stress the tissue just that extra little bit. You might as well...)

haplo6

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #72 on: May 07, 2003, 09:45:00 »
This should have been here to begin with:

I‘m new to this forum so forgive me if I missed the boat on some of these comments. Here‘s a fresh perspective:

I think Polkovnik is right, physical fitness standards in the CF are very low. I have been in for 4 years now and I know it doesn‘t seem that long but you‘d think I would have been subject to some sort of fitness review in that time. I have never had to pass a 13km ruck march, we did one on QL3 in 99 but it wasn‘t a requirement and a good thing too because 7 of us finished out of 28, instructors included. It is a problem when people can no longer fulfill their roles due to poor fitness standards. If there was some sort of yearly test like the ones they used to have (not sure of any details on that) then soldiers, especially reservists would have the motivation to go out and due it on their own. It doesn‘t take much. Give the common soldier a goal, not just one too get in, but one to maintain and the average person will due their utmost to acheive that goal. Possibly incentives or rewards? Competition is what the world thrives on and it breeds better soldiers, troops, units, armies, companies etc. Anyone can pass a test one time but could you pass it 3 days later, or a week, a year. The sad truth is that in this army there are a lot of "soldiers" who can‘t.

Commenting on the 7min/mile thing...we‘re Canadian so that doesn‘t apply to us but the 7min/mile pace is equivalent to a 22min 5km run which everyone, regardless of shape of size, should be able to do.

For your information: Donovan Bailey ran the 100m in 9.84s to win the 96 Atlanta Olympics. Maurice Green (that American) beat it by running 9.79. Last year another American, Tim Montgomery bettered it to 9.78.


"Not trying is the greatest sin of all"

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haplo6

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #73 on: May 07, 2003, 09:46:00 »
This should have been here to begin with:

I‘m new to this forum so forgive me if I missed the boat on some of these comments. Here‘s a fresh perspective:

I think Polkovnik is right, physical fitness standards in the CF are very low. I have been in for 4 years now and I know it doesn‘t seem that long but you‘d think I would have been subject to some sort of fitness review in that time. I have never had to pass a 13km ruck march, we did one on QL3 in 99 but it wasn‘t a requirement and a good thing too because 7 of us finished out of 28, instructors included. It is a problem when people can no longer fulfill their roles due to poor fitness standards. If there was some sort of yearly test like the ones they used to have (not sure of any details on that) then soldiers, especially reservists would have the motivation to go out and due it on their own. It doesn‘t take much. Give the common soldier a goal, not just one too get in, but one to maintain and the average person will due their utmost to acheive that goal. Possibly incentives or rewards? Competition is what the world thrives on and it breeds better soldiers, troops, units, armies, companies etc. Anyone can pass a test one time but could you pass it 3 days later, or a week, a year. The sad truth is that in this army there are a lot of "soldiers" who can‘t.

Commenting on the 7min/mile thing...we‘re Canadian so that doesn‘t apply to us but the 7min/mile pace is equivalent to a 22min 5km run which everyone, regardless of shape of size, should be able to do.

For your information: Donovan Bailey ran the 100m in 9.84s to win the 96 Atlanta Olympics. Maurice Green (that American) beat it by running 9.79. Last year another American, Tim Montgomery bettered it to 9.78.


"Not trying is the greatest sin of all"

me

Offline ProPatria05

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Re: Another situps question
« Reply #74 on: May 07, 2003, 15:18:00 »
At the risk of offending anyone, I can‘t believe this topic has generated so many responses.

Very simply,

How do you train for a running test? - RUN
How do you train for push-up test? - PUSH UPS
How do you train for a sit-up test? - SIT UPS

There are a lot of people who have posted on this board that, forgive me if I‘m wrong, are only interested in fitness because they‘re being tested. For those who want to be in the military, get used to the idea that fitness has to become a part of your life - something you don‘t even think about. Never mind "how many situps should I be able to do to pass the test". How about "how many situps would I be able to do if I pushed my body to the breaking point". If you don‘t think this is a way of life you can adopt, then maybe the Army isn‘t for you.

You think the Express Test is hard, wait until you have to do the 13km ruck march, which everyone should have to do. Or hump your ruck, with a 522 radio set strapped on top of it, up a snow-covered hill, with a toboggan in tow. You‘ll be wishing for the Express Test.

Just get out, start running, start doing pushups and situps. Don‘t worry about details. And when you‘re ready to drop - keep going.