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Offline MCG

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The Canadian Rangers Merged Thread
« on: August 09, 2004, 00:06:40 »
Canada's rangers less at home on their range

By BOB WEBER
Canadian Press

As the military prepares this week for its largest-ever exercise to reinforce Arctic sovereignty, concerns are growing that the aboriginal soldiers at the core of Canada's northern defence are losing their traditional skills.

The Canadian Rangers aren't as home on the tundra as they used to be, say both regular army officers and the Rangers themselves.

â Å“The younger generation aren't as interested in it as the older ones,â ? said Yellowknife-based warrant officer Dave Coupland, who trains Ranger patrols.

Many younger Rangers don't even have basic survival skills.

â Å“I've had people that didn't know how to make a snow block, didn't even know how to try to start an igloo,â ? said Solomon Voisey, 55, a Ranger sergeant from Whale Cove, Nunavut.

The Defence Department has long recognized the problem.

â Å“The greatest challenge to the Ranger program is (to) stop the erosion of traditional skills,â ? says a 2000 Arctic capability study obtained by The Canadian Press under Access to Information legislation.

â Å“The most pressing challenge for the unit is to ensure the continued long-term viability of the Ranger program. Fewer Rangers are at home on the land and the traditional skills of the Rangers are decreasing with each generation.â ?

The Rangers, who have patrolled with snowmobiles and vintage Lee Enfield rifles from northern Ontario to the magnetic North Pole, are Canada's primary military presence in the North. As international interest grows in the Northwest Passage, Ranger surveillance is one of Canada's strongest claims to control over it.

The Rangers also play important roles in the Arctic operations of the regular forces. They provide local knowledge on weather patterns, snow and ice conditions and safe travel routes.

â Å“If we have a unit from the south, the Rangers take them around â ” almost like the scouts back in the cavalry days,â ? said Mr. Coupland.

Up to 25 Rangers will be involved in Operation Narwhal off Baffin Island, which begins Thursday and lasts until the end of August. It will involve the army, air force and navy in the first modern joint Arctic exercise by the Canadian Forces.

The Rangers are depended on to demonstrate how to work comfortably at temperatures that can reach -50 C. They teach survival skills from building improvised shelters to setting a snare.

They're also gifted improvisers. Mr. Coupland has seen Rangers fix a flat tire by stuffing it with peat moss and patch a punctured snowmobile piston with a dime.

The combination of land skills and military training is a hugely valuable asset, said Major Stewart Gibson, responsible for all the North's Rangers.

â Å“You get a synergistic effect,â ? he said.

But that synergy is harder to find as northern aboriginals gradually adopt southern lifestyles.

â Å“Why go out on the land and be cold when you could be back in a nice warm house and eat frozen pizza?â ? asked Mr. Coupland. â Å“Why do that when you don't have to?â ?

Sergeant Voisey said even older people use their skills less and less.

â Å“A lot of the parents don't go out much any more.â ?

In an attempt to help pass on skills that used to be part of regular Arctic family life, the army includes elders in its training sessions for younger Rangers.

A Junior Rangers program has also been started, which involves 2,700 youths aged 12 to 18.

But a once- or twice-yearly week on the land is no substitute for what used to be a way of life.

Sgt. Voisey, who's been a Ranger for 16 years, estimates fewer than 5 per cent of Rangers younger than 25 have much traditional knowledge.

Nevertheless, Canada's reliance on the Rangers is unlikely to diminish. The military plans to increase their strength from 4,000 to 4,800 by 2008.

Major Gibson said traditional skills are stronger in some communities than others and he remains confident his patrols are both safe and effective.

But he acknowledges more training is needed if the skills that have marked the Rangers are to survive. The Arctic capability study also recommended increased training and an â Å“aggressiveâ ? patrol program.

Money, however, is the issue.

â Å“I've got 40 per cent of Canada's land mass to train people on and the only way to get around is by air,â ? said Major Gibson.

Without more resources to help teach others, traditional Arctic land skills will gradually die out, Sgt. Voisey predicts.

â Å“Fifty years down the road we're going to have microwaves and live off TV dinners.â ?


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040808.wrange0808/BNStory/National/

Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Canadian Rangers less at home in the Arctic
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2004, 17:11:37 »
Goes back to the thread abouot equipment which may not work in the artic...

lets get back into it.
"Return with your shield, or upon it."

Offline 0tto Destruct

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Re: Canadian Rangers less at home in the Arctic
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2004, 23:23:04 »
Not to be a crap disturber, Armymedic, but its apples and oranges. The problem that WO Copeland and Capt. Shubert (and not be a name dropper, but I know both of them...it's a small area) are talking about is with losing a body of traditional knowledge of the land, and not with the equipment being used. Kids today are more concerned with playing their X-Box and getting a job down South (meaning Edmonton...) then learning how to build igloo and hunt seal.

The issued equipment being used is fine. If there's one thing that folks need to understand is that the equipment that we use up here HAS to be sufficient. If it weren't, it would be a safety hazard. If you go out without the right kit, you'll die up here, and that's a fact of life.

I know that most of the ranger instructors up here, in true combat arms Snr. NCO fashion, will ***** about everything, and they certainly will ***** about the issue IECS equipment, but it does work well. Personally, I haven't been out on the tundra in the high arctic, but I have been out in extreme cold on a snowmobile, both here in Yellowknife and in Labrador, and the IECS stuff was fine for me. All Ranger Instructors get issued Canada Goose Snow Mantra parkas, and some other off-the-shelf equipment. A good deal of them will also wear traditional skins and furs. However, they stuff these guys do is far beyond what would be expected of soldiers down south. All equipment they use is purchased by the QM, and issued to these guys. Keep in mind that that's for the communities in the far far North. The IECS system is more then adequate for any operation we might be called to do.

You'd laugh if you could see what the Inuit Rangers use. I've seen these guys working out in -40 in a Ranger sweater, bib overalls, a thin touque, no gloves, and a smoke haning out of their face bombing up trails at breakneck speeds...it's a sight to see!
« Last Edit: August 11, 2004, 23:28:36 by Arctic Acorn »

Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Canadian Rangers less at home in the Arctic
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2004, 20:02:52 »
True, Artic Acorn...

My brief post should read more like:

We should put effort into maintaining the skills that make us Canadian soldiers. For us Southerners, that means getting north to practice our skills and use the equipment. For the rangers it means attempting to maintain those ancient survival skills the Northern Indians and Inuit are known for, if for now other reason but to teach us.
"Return with your shield, or upon it."

Offline 0tto Destruct

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Re: Canadian Rangers less at home in the Arctic
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2004, 21:04:08 »
I couldn't agree more, Armymedic.

One of the reasons that the Ranger program is so great is that it does preserve those traditional skillsets for the communities. The Junior Ranger program is actually starting to supplant northern Cadet Units, simply because of the more Northern, traditional focus.

The Rangers, and DND, have done a lot of good for the communities up here. It kinda gives this jaded 111 a warm fuzzy about our organisation...   :warstory:

Offline fredranger

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What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2006, 13:11:58 »
I have spent quite some time looking over the internet, and at official sites, http://www.rangers.dnd.ca/, to find out just what people think, or know about the Canadian Rangers. I must say, I find the lack of information somewhat dishearting. The impression that I have noticed that most people have about the Rangers, there are Inuits in red sweaters on snowmobiles, or, they are First Nations people who just can't get into the Canadian Forces any other way. While the first two observations are somewhat true, it isn't the whole picture. I am a Canadian Ranger. I am one of the "few white guys". I went to Kamloops for Cougar Salvo 05, and was a little shocked that most of the Regulars and Reservists down there had almost no clue to who we were, and what the Rangers do. The Rangers had a minor role at Cougar Salvo, and at the following ex Phoenix Ram 05, at Wainwright, but the exposure the Rangers received was invaluable. My question is this, what do you really know about the Canadian Rangers? Now, I don't mean checking out websites, going through the investigative process of dry facts, but what do YOU really know. Have you met any? Were you at Cougar Salvo, or Phoenix Ram and talk to any? Are you a Canadian Ranger? I post this, just because, I really want to know.

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2006, 13:24:40 »
Instead of asking us, why don't you save us the time and bandwidth and tell us. You're a Ranger, tell us all about it, from top to bottom. Who are they, what is their role, where are they, where do they come from, how do you get involved or join, what do you do. I'm sure you get the drift. Pretend your explaining the whole Ranger thing to a bunch of Europeans, anticipate what questions may be asked, and incorporate them into your narrative. TAke as much room as you need.

Thanks in advance, looking forward to reading your reply.

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Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2006, 14:47:36 »
Well, first off, I can only speak for myself, I won't make the claim of knowing what other Ranger patrols are doing, or what part of society is in their make up. Secondly, I would have to boil a lot of what I know of the Rangers down to the dry facts. One individuals thoughts and experience shouldn't reflect on the group as a whole. But for myself, here goes. I am part of 4CRPG (Canadian Ranger Patrol Group) which covers British Columbia, Alberta, and Manitoba. Our patrol is based out of Pouce Coupe, a small town 35km from the Alberta border (sovereignty patrols are not a big issue here, well national anyways....). We have about 20 to 28 rangers within the patrol (given the predetermined activity). Most of the recent training has been geared towards local SAR, with such exercises as "Lost Airmen", where the patrol traipse off into the bush (only the patrol Sergeant and the 2IC know where we are going), to look for downed pilot. The patrol is split into three groups, one performs a hasty search into the bush, another performs a recee of roads, buildings, ditches, etc, while the last group performs evac prep. Some of the other training we exercise is; OP, recee patrols, helicopter LZ, map and compass (now expanded to GPS), and drill. For Cougar Salvo 05, the 39 Canadian Brigade Group put out an open invitation for Rangers to participate. I was 1 of 2 people sent from my patrol, and I must say, I had a blast. Snow in Kamloops, in March was a bit of a shock, but it didn't stick around for long. Most of the Ranger involvement was us portraying "displaced persons", much like what was seen in Bosnia. Regular townsfolk, who were told, not to trust UN, or Canadian Forces members. As it goes for Phoenix Ram 05, I understand the Rangers repeated their Kamloops performance. Canadian Rangers are issued the Lee Enfield No. 4 .303 bolt action rifle. A nice heavy old rifle. The long standing joke has been "Have you heard about the new Ranger rifle?"...............crickets.............the wind.................... We spend time at our range (an old gravel pit) practicing firearms safety and procedures with a fellow Ranger as an acting RSO. Recent word coming down the pipe is the roles of the Rangers is going to change, in which direction, and what it entails, nobody seems to know for sure, but the word is, the change is coming very soon. Still, my original question stands.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2006, 18:30:16 by fredranger »

Offline Junius

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2006, 15:32:35 »
I agree with recceguy. Just tell us. I don't know a flipping thing about them, so how am I supposed to ask you informed questions?

Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2006, 16:14:15 »
With the recent unfolding events surrounding US Ambassador David Wilkins, and Stephen Harper concerning arctic sovereignty, I would have thought more interest might have been generated over the Canadian Rangers. With exposure on both CBC, CTV, various websites and newspapers, I was merely trying to get a clearer picture of what people of them. After seeing the response, on this very forum, to the incident at the Peace Arch border crossing, concerning unarmed CBSA officers leaving thier posts, for safety reasons, I was hopeful that this thread might have generated the same kind of interest, or the submission of stories or people's thought on the Rangers. Also, I can't be the only Ranger here, and I can't explain the whole story by myself. Perhaps, I asked the wrong question, at the wrong time.

Offline kahone

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2006, 17:28:34 »
Funny you mention that; after the exchange in the media between PMD Harper and Ambassador Wilkins I saw a brief mention of the Rangers here on the forum (can't recall which board it was at the time) and decided to look em up.  I found, well, not much and mainly on the website you mentioned.  But it was very interesting nevertheless.  I was curious how much contact with other components of the CF you have outside of exercises...Regulars, Reservists, which CF elements; how widely distributed you are (in all directions); what does a typical Arctic winter do to your training schedule...etc.  Maybe you could spread the word about the forum to other members of Ranger patrols, I'm sure there are many contributers here who would be very interested in leaning more (includin' me!)
K

edit: meant to add URL with links to 2 Ranger Patrol sites - interesting stuff:
http://www.rangers.dnd.ca/pubs/contact_e.asp
« Last Edit: January 31, 2006, 17:34:43 by kahone »

Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2006, 17:56:45 »
The thing I have noticed mostly, is not too many people even know that the Rangers even exists. Some of the attention we have been getting in the media has shown the Inuit wearing the bright red ball cap and sweater, on the snowmobile. This is the image that seems to stick with people. As for contact with Regulars and Reservists, that seems to happen only during a big ex, like Cougar Salvo/Phoenix Ram, just to name 2. Sometimes, a multi-patrol ex is put on, requiring a CH-146 Griffon, and of course, Rangers are not just going to be allowed to fly that around. We also get semi-regular visits from headquarters (4CRPG is Headquartered in Victoria B.C.), from Warrent Officers, and up through the ranks, that tour around, visiting the various patrols. They pass along news of changes for the Rangers, an upcoming ex, or just to see how we are doing. As for contact with other patrols, once again, during a big ex, a multi-patrol ex, and/or during courses and training at Camp Albert Head, at CFB Esquimalt. There are some other times various patrols come together, but I just can't think of them right now. Our patrol is in B.C., so arctic training doesn't really come into play, but the weather can get just as cold here, never the less. The snow can get deep, the air is not too warm, and you have to keep an eye on dehydration and possible hypothermia. For us, exercising a little common sense.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2006, 18:28:29 by fredranger »

Offline Hansol

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2006, 18:58:47 »
All that being said,  I'm curious: what do you rangers DO? I understand you do "search and rescue" roles, but what about military exercises? what is your role in today's Big-Green-Machine? Just curious as to what the "job" of our Rangers is in today's world

Edit: Terrible grammar and spelling and composition
« Last Edit: January 31, 2006, 21:35:39 by Hansol »
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Offline 3rd Herd

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2006, 19:36:51 »
History of the Canadian Rangers

Born of a ‘needs must’ urgency, the Pacific Coast Militia Rangers (PCMR) was conceived early in 1942.Organized as local defence units along military lines, the PCMR were to protect various points along the serrated BC Coast. Under the provision of General Order 320 on August 12, 1942, the PCMR was made a corps of the Active Militia.The concept was hugely successful as, between March and July 1942, some 10,000 men volunteered.  By 1945, there were 15,000 men.(CMHG) Their issued outfits consisted of bone-dry pants, bone-dry camouflage jackets and hats that resembled today’s popular Tilley.(Johnson)For armaments a  .303 Lee Enfield rifle was issued and is still in service today with the Canadian Rangers.

Experienced men such as loggers, trappers, prospectors and ranchers were sought for this role. Those who were close to populated centres were trained and employed in intelligence duties and local defence against minor raids. They were instructed in tactical situations including observation, especially coast watching against a possible Japanese invasion, anti-sabotage measures and protection of lines of communication and transportation.(Johnson) While Debbie Towell, observed that, "young lads . . . in outlying areas were extremely valuable. Boys of 15 years and up proved to be good shots, could handle an axe, and were valuable as guides to city bred men." The rangers remained on call until 1945. They came close to being called up for duty between November 1944 and April 1945 when the Japanese launched approximately 10,00 unmanned balloon bombs destined for the western North American coast.(Johnson)

In 1947 the PCMR was reactivated under their title of today the Canadian Rangers. The organization was expanded from the Pacific Coast area to include Canada's northern regions as a sovereignty measure and "providing a military presence where the was not requirement for stationing regular force troops as it would be prohibitively expense."(Karman). Addition duties in this time period were to at again as scouts and intelligence gathersin case of a Soviet attack across the polar route. In the high arctic particular attention was given to the spotting of  possible Soviet submarines. In 1988 through restricting the Rangers were confirmed as a Unit of the reserve forces. Today in organizational terms the Rangers are a part of Land Forces Command. In five Ranger Groups covering again the remote areas of Canada. With the election of Prime Minister Harper there is discussion taking place over expanding the Rangers by " recruiting up to 500 more members and revitalising their training"(CBC) A new updated weapon the PGWDTI Coyote is being lobbied for but in the realm of fiscal resitrant the old Ranger stand by .303 maybe just updated.(CASR). In closing this review off I have had a brief bit of experience with the Rangers on the remote Pacific Northwest Coast. They are at the bottom of the funding chain and in our case we were on a three year waiting list to have a old patrol  group reestablished. As to the military potential of this organization there is one Ranger patrol group on the west coast the is exclusively manned by former Recce plt members. This group has repeatably given reserves and US troops a sound thrashing in recent exercises. Vice Chief of Defence Ron Buck while MARPAC Commander was heard to say " these are as a professional group as our regular forces"( CFB Esquimalt, 2002)


Sources:
Canadian American Strategic Review, A Modest Proposal, Simplifying Supply, 7.62mm for the Rangers?" http://www.sfu.ca/casr/mp-enfield.htm

Canadian Military History Gateway http://cmhg.gc.ca/html/glossary/default-en.asp?t=1&letter=P&page=1

Johnson, Wendy: "Pacific Coast Militia Rangers trained in Oliver during ‘forties"
http://www.oliverchronicle.com/2003_19.htm

Karman,Najwa, "The Canadain Rangers 60 Years Later", The Maple Leaf, Vol 5 No.16, 2002

Towell Debbie, "Pacific Coast Militia Rangers, British Columbia's Own Home Guard" http://www.navalandmilitarymuseum.org/resource_pages/coastal_defence/pcmr.html

 
Edit Grammer
 


« Last Edit: January 31, 2006, 19:45:25 by 3rd Herd »
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Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2006, 19:45:27 »
To the best of my knowledge, 1 CRPG with 58 patrols, and covers Northwest Territory, Yukon Territory, and Nunavut are tasked with surveillance/sovereignty patrols (SOV PATS), conduct inspections of the North Warning System (NWS) sites, collect and share local data of significance in support of military operations. In recent times, Rangers have been part of joint exercises with Regular and Reserve forces pertaining to arctic activities. Rangers act as local guides to the region, and sharing hands on sub-zero survival training. The Pouce Coupe patrol (which I am part of), is currently tasked with local SAR, emergency response efforts (natural disasters), and providing a military presence in the area. So far, most of our time has been spent at the range, and conducting recce patrols, and classroom review. Word is coming down that there are some changes in store, be it a change in our mandate, or taskings, of which, I don't know what is going to happen.

Offline Acorn

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2006, 22:19:58 »
For armaments a  .303 Lee Enfield rifle was issued and is still in service today with the Canadian Rangers.

The PCMR were also issued a Winchester 30-30 (I forget the model, '98?) at some stage. A mate of mine had one, issued to a relative, marked with the C-Broad Arrow.
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Offline Hunter

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2006, 22:46:36 »
Thanks for the info I've always been interested in what you guys do.   :salute:

One thing I noticed when doing some research into awards and citations is the number of medals and citations that have been awarded to Rangers.  There are quite a few listed on the Governor General's website for various incidents in the north. http://www.gg.ca/honours/search-recherche/index_e.asp
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Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2006, 00:46:15 »
I have found some information on the other issued rifle of the Pacific Coast Militia Rangers. It was the Winchester 1894 (M94) Pacific Coast Militia Rangers PCMR Carbine. A picture of one can be found at http://www.rarewinchesters.com/gunroom/1894/model_94.shtml, scroll down, it's the second one from the bottom. Some addtional information can be found at http://www.rarewinchesters.com/gunroom/1894/M94-1331722/M94-1331722.shtml and http://www.jouster.com/cgi-bin/garand/garand.pl?noframes;read=74588. Two medals that I know that have been awarded to Canadian Rangers are; Special Service Medal (SSM) http://www.forces.gc.ca/hr/dhh/honours_awards/engraph/honour_awards_e.asp?cat=3&Q_ID=35, and the Canadian Forces Decoration (CD) http://www.forces.gc.ca/hr/dhh/honours_awards/engraph/honour_awards_e.asp?cat=3&Q_ID=92. The SSM is awarded after 4 years of good service, and being in good standing with the patrol, and headquarters. The CD is awarded (I think.....) after 10 years of good service, etc. For both medals, there is more to the criteria of eligibility than I have listed here. Other medals have been awarded to Rangers over the years, for various reasons, from local patrols, all the way up to the Governor General.

Offline 0tto Destruct

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2006, 10:07:32 »
Fredranger,

I have had the privelege of working with Rangers, both with the Patrol in Black Tickle, Labrador, and also with a few individuals at 1CRPG when I was working at CFNA in Yellowknife. Rangers have to be some of the nicest bunch of people I've worked with in the CF. They fill a very important role in the Northern communities, both as community elders, but also as a repository of traditional skillsets.

Anyway, there's a few Southeners out there that know and appreciate what you guys do up there...thanks!

 :dontpanic:

Offline x westie

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2006, 11:12:10 »
The PCMR were also issued a Winchester 30-30 (I forget the model, '98?) at some stage. A mate of mine had one, issued to a relative, marked with the C-Broad Arrow.
                          I was told that the Nco's were issued Sten Guns and that some PCMR also were issued the U.S. m-1917 Enfield rifle in .30 calibre,  maybe somebody else can help me on these 2 weapons been issued. :cdn:

Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2006, 11:42:53 »
Osprey's Canadian Forces in World War II http://www.ospreypublishing.com/title_detail.php/title=S3020~ser=MAA, decribes the weapons the PCMR used, from page 13;
"The Rangers at first used their own sporting guns, but were later armed with a variety of older rifles such as the Ross .303, Enfield .30-60 1917, Marlin 1936 and Savage 99; the most popular were Winchester 64 and 94 models in .30-30 calibre. Sten sub-machine guns were later issued on a scale of about one to every 15 men."
« Last Edit: February 01, 2006, 12:23:32 by fredranger »

Offline Frankie

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2006, 12:37:11 »
Did a sovereignty ex in a village named Holman on Victoria Island way up north. Worked with the rangers. Couple of highlights..... :warstory:

Fire power demo on the lake.Fresh caribou (shot by the rangers), hare (hunted by the rangers by running them over with the snowmobiles to conserve ammo), small tent fire that lost my left muckluck along with the right of the guy beside me. I'm size 11 he was size 8 iirc, resulted in us not changing camp locations. Also discovered that sorrels are not as good as our booties. "Arctic Turnips". Tracking fox and ptarmigan. Polar bear watch (5 rounds each tent as this was during the days of the FN) and a white out. Ice fishing sucks... no fish lots of ice.

Rangers had a little husky pup that had his paw cut by a skate on the outside rink. Being November, it would not heal until the spring, word had it they were going to put it down. We got very attached to the little guy. One of the gang took it upon himself to smuggle the little pup home in his kitbag. Got off the plane back home, out pops the pup... named him Ranger in honour of the guys up north. every man who had room for a dog like that put their name into a hat, some guy from New Brunswick got the dog.

All in all a good experience, watched one of the rangers cleaning the carburetor of his skidoo, bare handed in a can of gas in -20 to -30 weather. 

Lots of time in the tent. Had it up to an unhealthy 80 degrees at head level when sitting.
Bodily functions of the solid variety were challenging, not to mention very quickly carried out.

Rangers were very friendly,hard, and capable people.






Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2006, 14:13:47 »
The general impression I have gotten from the 1CRPG Rangers, north of 60, is they have the skills, that are a cross of, MacGyver, Davy Crockett, and the Boy Scouts. Most of them posses an uncanny circumstantial ingenuity, for complex operational difficulties (say that 10 times, really fast....).
They demonstrate their practice problem solving abilities within an unforgiving environment, with few raw materials and/or resources. They tap into their traditional knowledge base just for life and death survival. For the Rangers, south of 60, the landscape isn't so barren. For example, the Pouce Coupe patrol (which I am a part of) has plenty of natural resources available. The bush can keep you alive, if you know how to use it, for food, protection from the elements, etc. Where up north, the landscape is very different, constantly changing during the winter, extremely difficult just to get your directional bearings, we just usually get snow cover on an unchanged topography. Plus, our patrol operates in an area that is much smaller, with clearly defined geographical locations and boundaries, in just about all seasons. Here is a link  with some more information on 1CRPG http://www.cfna.forces.gc.ca/new_member/yk_units_e.asp#rangers .
« Last Edit: February 01, 2006, 14:18:14 by fredranger »

Offline 3rd Herd

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #23 on: February 01, 2006, 14:22:37 »
                          I was told that the Nco's were issued Sten Guns and that some PCMR also were issued the U.S. m-1917 Enfield rifle in .30 calibre,  maybe somebody else can help me on these 2 weapons been issued. :cdn:

The Canadian Rangers, Report No.92, Historical Section (G.S.), Army Headquarters, 1 December, 1960. Antecedents 3.
 http://www.forces.ca/dhh/downloads/ahq/ahq092.pdf

Directorate of History, "The Employment of Infantry in the Pacific Coast Defences (Aug 39 to Dec43)",NDHO, Ottawa 1986.
http://www.forces.ca/dhh/downloads/ahq/ahq003.pdf
As follows

"Equipment initially consisted only of sporting rifles , steel helmets and arm bands. Subsequent issues were waterproof jackets and trousers, Sten guns, 30/06 Enfield rifles and pistols."(Canadian Rangers) In addition "Sten sub machine guns, .303 and 30.06 srevice rifles, and .30-.30 US sporting rifles were issued on a scale that gave all companies an oppourtunity to carry out range practice................"(NDHQ pg.26)

In the Order of Council P.C. 1644( 23 May 1947) and the resulting General Staff Statement states "No equipment would be provided, except Rifles No. 4 Mk.I on loan"( CR pg.4). Eskimos and Indians received a 100 round allotment of ammunition for their service annually.(CR pg.11).

On the 27th of April 1951 "special authority was given Headquarters Western Command to issue 12 Bren guns and 12 Sten guns to each of the Fort Radium Platoon, ...and No.7 Company at Yellowknife because:
 a) Fort Radium Platoon is compoposed of employees of the Eldorado Mining and Smelting Company( a Crown Company) and will defend the uranium mine in an emergency.
b) Yellowknife would be an important forward base in the event of operations in the North.54"(CR pg.15)

Intresting asides from the same report:

" A one time officer in the Irish Republican Army and now a resident of British Columbia, Brendan Kennelly, was appointed to instruct in guerrilla warfare"

"No. 40 Company helped RCMP capture three bandits during the previous April". (pg.16) "the bandits approached the block and looking down the business end of ten .303's realized the game was up"(17).

Choo
« Last Edit: February 01, 2006, 14:48:19 by 3rd Herd »
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Offline 3rd Horseman

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2006, 15:13:31 »
3rd,

   Nice notes cool you are the master of the obscure history, well done.
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