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Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #50 on: March 20, 2007, 22:32:11 »
OMG! That was just bad.

Offline Pte. Infantry

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #51 on: March 20, 2007, 22:56:04 »
before reading the posts here i knew that the Rangers were mainly of first nations decent given the area they mainly operate in (the Territories), but not to say there isnt any other race involved. I also knew there were mainly a serch and rescue type of team and that they patrolled the territories for abnormal activities and then reported them to the higher ups.

after reading these posts i have pretty much the same idea but i now know they just dont operate in the north, also i didnt know they got to carry rifles until i read this thread haha

but i like the storey about the submarine going "ping ping"  :rofl:
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Offline Bigmac

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #52 on: March 25, 2007, 09:15:13 »
Quote
Canadian Forces patrol heads out on sovereignty patrol in High Arctic

RESOLUTE BAY, Nunavut (CP) - A 24-member Canadian Forces patrol headed out Saturday on an 8,000-kilometre trek by snowmobile to confirm Canada's sovereignty in the High Arctic and to check for signs of polar bear hunters.

It will be the longest distance every travelled by a sovereignty patrol in Canadian history.

"My guys are pumped up. They're ready to conquer the entire Arctic alone to make it," said Maj. Chris Bergeron, commanding officer of 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group.

"We've got lots of obstacles to go through but we have a good chance to make it."

The three-week patrol, launched at a cost of almost $1 million, will include members of the Regular Forces and Canadian Rangers, who are part-time reserve soldiers.

They will go in three teams and will face stretches of open water, hard rock, impassable ice and will have to winch machines up a waterfall.

Two teams will drive to Eureka, a remote weather station on Ellesmere Island and from there travel around the island before joining up again at Canadian Forces Station Alert at the northern tip of the island.

Alert is the world's most northernly permanently settled community. It conducts signals intelligence gathering.

In addition to establishing a military presence, the sovereignty patrol will evaluate the terrain and infrastructure of the High Arctic, including old landing strips and abandoned buildings so that rescue officials will be prepared for the eventuality of a crash or forced landing due to increasing commercial air traffic over the region.

http://www.recorder.ca/cp/National/070324/n032429A.html

    If we are to truly protect our northern sovereignty then we should be expanding the rank and file of the Canadian Rangers significantly and build a base in the north.
    The Canadian Rangers and the other soldiers are certainly going to earn their pay on this patrol. 8000 Km by snowmobile! Have fun guys and good luck!
   


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Offline GAP

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The Rangers Merged Thread
« Reply #53 on: March 25, 2007, 21:08:39 »
Cdn. Forces head out on High Arctic patrol
Updated Sun. Mar. 25 2007 12:09 PM ET Canadian Press
Article Link

RESOLUTE BAY, Nunavut -- A 24-member Canadian Forces patrol headed out Saturday on an 8,000-kilometre trek by snowmobile to confirm Canada's sovereignty in the High Arctic and to check for signs of polar bear hunters.

It will be the longest distance every travelled by a sovereignty patrol in Canadian history.

"My guys are pumped up. They're ready to conquer the entire Arctic alone to make it," said Maj. Chris Bergeron, commanding officer of 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group.

"We've got lots of obstacles to go through but we have a good chance to make it."

The three-week patrol, launched at a cost of almost $1 million, will include members of the Regular Forces and Canadian Rangers, who are part-time reserve soldiers.

They will go in three teams and will face stretches of open water, hard rock, impassable ice and will have to winch machines up a waterfall.

Two teams will drive to Eureka, a remote weather station on Ellesmere Island and from there travel around the island before joining up again at Canadian Forces Station Alert at the northern tip of the island.
More on link
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Offline Pte. Infantry

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Re: Cdn. Forces head out on High Arctic patrol
« Reply #54 on: March 25, 2007, 21:32:44 »
is polar bear hunting that big of a deal or is this just a chance to expose some of our forces to that situation?
more or less a training exercise  or for the experience type of deal?
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Offline Avro_Arrow_1976

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Re: Cdn. Forces head out on High Arctic patrol
« Reply #55 on: March 25, 2007, 22:26:12 »
This is quite a big deal. My unit, 440 Sqn is heavily involved in a lot of the resupply and recce for the mission. We will deliver fuel and food caches with our ski bird for the patrols to resupply. The Rangers are doing three simultaneous patrols, and one of them, on the NW side of Ellesmere Island may not succeed. Looking at sattellite imagery the other day of the ice conditions, there are pressure ridges over 30 feet high. Try driving a skidoo over that. There is also not a lot of snow on a lot of the mountainous sections of their route. So they may not suceed, although they are confident that they will. If they do it will be quite an accomplishment.

Offline GAP

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Re: Cdn. Forces head out on High Arctic patrol
« Reply #56 on: March 26, 2007, 15:16:27 »
This might be a partial reason for the presence patrols going on now.......

Resource race heats up in melting Arctic
Updated Sat. Mar. 24 2007 2:12 PM ET Associated Press
Article Link

HAMMERFEST, Norway -- Barren and uninhabited, Hans Island is very hard to find on a map. Yet these days the Frisbee-shaped rock in the Arctic is much in demand -- so much so that Canada and Denmark have both staked their claim to it with flags and warships.

The reason: an international race for oil, fish, diamonds and shipping routes, accelerated by the impact of global warming on Earth's frozen north.

The latest report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says the ice cap is warming faster than the rest of the planet and ice is receding, partly due to greenhouse gases. It's a catastrophic scenario for the Arctic ecosystem, for polar bears and other wildlife, and for Inuit populations whose ancient cultures depend on frozen waters.

But some see a lucrative silver lining of riches waiting to be snatched from the deep, and the prospect of timesaving sea lanes that could transform the shipping industry the way the Suez Canal did in the 19th century.

The U.S. Geological Survey estimates the Arctic has as much as 25 per cent of the world's undiscovered oil and gas. Russia reportedly sees the potential of minerals in its slice of the Arctic sector approaching $2 trillion.

All this has pushed governments and businesses into a scramble for sovereignty over these suddenly priceless seas.

Regardless of climate change, oil and gas exploration in the Arctic is moving full speed ahead. State-controlled Norwegian oil company Statoil ASA plans to start tapping gas from its offshore Snoehvit field in December, the first in the Barents Sea. It uses advanced equipment on the ocean floor, remote-controlled from the Norwegian oil boom town of Hammerfest through a 90-mile undersea cable.

Alan Murray, an analyst with the consulting firm Wood Mackenzie, said most petroleum companies are now focusing research and exploration on the far north. Russia is developing the vast Shkotman natural gas field off its Arctic coast, and Norwegians hope their advanced technology will find a place there.
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Offline edgar

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #57 on: September 11, 2007, 22:09:23 »
Hey FredRanger. I had a Ranger cover me with a shotgun while I set up an antenna in Churchill. So you could say, without too much exaggeration, I've already bet my life on your organization. He took us to the dump to see the bears too. He was a cool guy but the ex didn't give him any chance to do anything.
I'm resurrecting this thread because my Dad gave me an enfield, and so now I'm paying attention to what the rangers know about weapons.

There was some discussion in the weapons thread about the role of Rangers. Some people don't see it as at all warlike, so they don't need real weapons. I see you as recce troops, so you should be equipped as similarly as is practicable. (Maybe keep the C-9s in the RCMP lockup). How do you and your patrol see your role? What would you like it to be? If new funding is coming your way due to the Russians claiming the north pole, how best to spend it? Would an automatic weapon, for example, even be all that useful to you?

I'd join but the nearest Patrol to me is Fond du Lac. Mapquest won't even tell me how far it is cause there is no road, but the commute would be brutal from Saskatoon. I hope you post more stuff. News or war stories or whatever.
I bet there are lots of folks who care about what you're doing and lurk here but don't post cause they don't have anything to add.
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Offline Breacher41

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #58 on: September 12, 2007, 17:56:21 »
Edgar,

    With all respects to the Rangers and their patrols, the arming of them to an extent of a fighting patrol would be a bad idea, and here are my reasons why:

1) A fighting patrol, generally have backup whether it be Pl, Coy, Air Support, Arty what ever. Support is 'readily available'. Now, when you're up in the land of the Polar Bears, your nearest back up could take hours, even DAYS to arrive. NO active air support is available, the nearest Ranger patrol could also be hours or days away. It just would not be feasible for a Ranger patrol to actively engage any suspected 'enemy'.

2) To properly equip Rangers with more weaponry then they require will mean that an increased allotment of ammunition which will rarely if ever be fired, would be stored. STORED. Currently I can think of better places for that ammo to be going then stored.

3) Increased weaponry also means increased training time, and then we delve into other things. FredRanger went on a watered down BMQ course, if we're to upgrade, up-arm all the Ranger patrols and Rangers, it means a 'watered' down version of ANY training would no longer suffice. This means stretching the training system even more then it is currently happening. It means that instead of doing a BMQ or its variant so that they are gtg on basic things military, we now have to decide whether or not we should send them to BIQ or a variant of BIQ. Then brush up on Arctic Warfare (which these ladies and gents are already somewhat familiar with, but humor me), all of which takes a large amount of time. The system is needed right now to pump out RegF/PRes troops for missions, now I'm not saying Rangers don't play a vital role, it's just that it would be tough to do.

4) Finally, up arming them with C-9s and other weapons does not alleviate the problem of an ease in the supply system. Previously only 1 type of ammo need to be shipped and considered for the North, now you're looking at 5.56, 7.62, Frags, SRAWW L, 40mm Grenades... lots of things to be stored and lots of logistiks to be worked out.

    The primary role of the Rangers currently are good. Their light role capabilities are sound and are quite effective. If we increase the amount of equipment to be carried, it would and could possibly limit their range, mobility, and effectiveness. Space previously used to carry food or extra fuel, are now taken up by 40mm, extra C-9 boxes, so on and so forth. Many native scouts during WWII in Papa Newguinea, Phillipines, China, Guam were all lightly armed and lightly equipped. This made them agile, quick and easy to deploy, which made them excellent sneak and peak, reccon troops. The #1 rule of Recce is to see without being seen, not to get into a firefight...

Just my 2 rupees.

MT.
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Offline edgar

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #59 on: September 14, 2007, 11:28:20 »
Edgar,

    With all respects to the Rangers and their patrols, the arming of them to an extent of a fighting patrol would be a bad idea, and here are my reasons why:

1) A fighting patrol, generally have backup whether it be Pl, Coy, Air Support, Arty what ever. Support is 'readily available'. Now, when you're up in the land of the Polar Bears, your nearest back up could take hours, even DAYS to arrive. NO active air support is available, the nearest Ranger patrol could also be hours or days away. It just would not be feasible for a Ranger patrol to actively engage any suspected 'enemy'.

2) To properly equip Rangers with more weaponry then they require will mean that an increased allotment of ammunition which will rarely if ever be fired, would be stored. STORED. Currently I can think of better places for that ammo to be going then stored.
3) Increased weaponry also means increased training time, and then we delve into other things. FredRanger went on a watered down BMQ course, if we're to upgrade, up-arm all the Ranger patrols and Rangers, it means a 'watered' down version of ANY training would no longer suffice. This means stretching the training system even more then it is currently happening. It means that instead of doing a BMQ or its variant so that they are gtg on basic things military, we now have to decide whether or not we should send them to BIQ or a variant of BIQ. Then brush up on Arctic Warfare (which these ladies and gents are already somewhat familiar with, but humor me), all of which takes a large amount of time. The system is needed right now to pump out RegF/PRes troops for missions, now I'm not saying Rangers don't play a vital role, it's just that it would be tough to do.

4) Finally, up arming them with C-9s and other weapons does not alleviate the problem of an ease in the supply system. Previously only 1 type of ammo need to be shipped and considered for the North, now you're looking at 5.56, 7.62, Frags, SRAWW L, 40mm Grenades... lots of things to be stored and lots of logistiks to be worked out.

    The primary role of the Rangers currently are good. Their light role capabilities are sound and are quite effective. If we increase the amount of equipment to be carried, it would and could possibly limit their range, mobility, and effectiveness. Space previously used to carry food or extra fuel, are now taken up by 40mm, extra C-9 boxes, so on and so forth. Many native scouts during WWII in Papa Newguinea, Phillipines, China, Guam were all lightly armed and lightly equipped. This made them agile, quick and easy to deploy, which made them excellent sneak and peak, reccon troops. The #1 rule of Recce is to see without being seen, not to get into a firefight...

Just my 2 rupees.

MT.
That looks like a good analysis. The problems of training and support are budget problems which may or may not be addressed with the new port and the new attention from Gov't. I'll let the recce gods debate what needs to be carried on a recce patrol. I led one, in my entire career, in Wainright in the summer, and passed with assistance. Here's everything I know about operations north of 60: when you go out for a smoke, kick the door before you open it to wake up the bears. So I hope to just fade back and watch the debate. The Rangers seem to be doing a fine job with their current role and budget. I guess my question should have been is anything going to change, or should anything change with the increased activity in the north?
And I like war stories in general too.
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Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #60 on: September 20, 2007, 02:17:52 »
Well, it has been a while since I have posted anything on here, but it is nice to see that some interest has been.......resurrected, in my absence. First and foremost Rangers are volunteers. People that become Rangers want to make a difference for Canada, but for reasons that have too many options, don't sign up for Reserve/Regular service. I don't believe this makes them any less dedicated. Rangers are people from all walks of life, and professions. In my personal opinion, I think this makes for a very effective team, sharing knowledge and skills with one another that you can't learn from a course, or textbook. For example, in my patrol, we have; A Korean War veteran, a provincial government employee, a cashier, a trapper, a truck driver, a millwright, and so on. I drive a pilot car. We are everyday folks, who want to do a little more, but are unable to give the full commitment. Some Rangers attend a "watered down BMQ course" to add military skills for operation applications. Other Rangers attend "Leadership Courses" to enhance and add to their knowledge. From an operational stand point, Rangers could be considered a causal recce patrol. Canada has had it pretty good, considering the state of world affairs. From a historical perspective, we are the only country in North America that did not have to fight for independence (Mexico fought Spain, and the U.S. fought the U.K.). Canada hasn't been openly attacked since the War of 1812 (unless you count the shelling of Esteven Point, British Columbia on June 20, 1942, which prompted the creation of the Pacific Coast Militia Rangers). For the second largest country in the world, Canada has a small military for her population, but has a world renowned reputation as Peacekeepers. Rangers are the only component of the Canadian Forces that wasn't part of the policy to close various Canadian Forces bases to consolidate units into fewer facilities, after major budget cuts and reorganization in the 1990's. Rangers face an uncertain future, the very world we live in is changing. The enemy doesn't wear the distinctive uniform of a foreign power, or use readily recognizable equipment. Old threats, considered quiet, are getting louder. Rangers are Canada's unconventional forces, for unconventional times.

Offline Sparkplugs

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #61 on: September 26, 2007, 15:38:15 »
Well, I come into this topic late, but I grew up knowing more about the Rangers than I did about any other part of the military!  I grew up north of Thunder Bay, Ontario, and north of my town, the Rangers often bring the Jr. Rangers up there for their summer camp exercise.   They also do some exercises for the Rangers there, both summer and winter.  I was a CI in an air cadet sqn for awhile, and we would go and visit the Ranger camp nearly every summer.  I got a chance to talk to Sgt. Moon for awhile, and the insights he lent me about the north were eye-opening and informative.  Some pretty interesting stuff. 

It was only far later that I ever saw my first cadpat-attired soldier.

And now that I'm in Borden, training as an AVN tech, I see Rangers all the time, as they have a training base here.  All of them that I've met, both first nations and those 'white guys', have all been wonderful people, always willing to talk to you and inform you.  I think it's a good thing that we have them...  Who else would head that far up north and patrol all day with slowmobiles?   :P
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Offline fredranger

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #62 on: October 17, 2007, 15:11:50 »
Recently, I have come across some videos concerning the Canadian Rangers on Youtube.com. One is from the Terrace Patrol, as they take a little excursion around the area, and into history. I found this little clip very interesting for the fact, Canada doesn't seem to preserve a lot of it's military heritage, unless you live in, or by a major center.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=ShPFmXOyhOE

When people think of Canadian Rangers, this is the first thing that pops into their heads:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=4_jgPfXTky4

This one, I am not so sure about, looks like a boat race up(or down?) the Yukon River. A mock invasion, but the Russians failed to show up?
http://youtube.com/watch?v=poIwV5GyCCo

And, finally, WESTERN FINANCIAL GROUP puts out a quarterly magazine called West, where in the recent issue, there is a brief article about the Rangers. A downloadable copy in the .pdf format (8.14 mb) is available at the following link:
http://www.westernfinancialgroup.net/WFG-Fall-07-low%20res.pdf


Offline old medic

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Rangers transfer to Land Force
« Reply #63 on: October 27, 2007, 08:10:35 »
http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/lf/English/6_1_1.asp?id=2320

Authority for Rangers transfers to Land Force
Thursday, October 25, 2007
Quote

OTTAWA, Ontario – The campfire was crackling beside the Canadian Ranger tee-pee when the Vice Chief of the Defence Staff (VCDS), Lieutenant-General Walter Natynczyk, and the Chief of Land Staff (CLS), Lieutenant-General Andrew Leslie, received their salute from the Canadian Ranger Honour Guard.

The Transfer of National Authority (TOCA) for the Canadian Rangers took place on Tuesday, 2 October at the Connaught Range and Primary Training Centre in Ottawa. It brought together Rangers from all five Canadian Ranger Patrol Groups (CRPGs) across the country.

CLS LGen Leslie is now the national authority for the Canadian Rangers. As the national authority, it is the Army Commander's intent to improve the Canadian Forces's operational capability by using the Rangers in providing local knowledge and expertise to all military operations in their area of responsibility. This capability will be further strengthened through the updating of roles, mission and tasks of the Canadian Rangers as required.

Declaring the CLS as the national authority for the Canadian Rangers formalizes the existing relationship between the various CRPGs and the Land Staff. LGen Leslie expressed his pleasure at the TOCA ceremony stating, "I am proud to welcome the Canadian Rangers to the Army and look forward to working with such skilled individuals."

The ceremony ended with a traditional meal including moose stew, tea and bannock hosted by the Canadian Rangers.

Article and photos by Capt Joanna Labonté, Army Public Affairs
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Offline old medic

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Rangers assert Arctic sovereignty the old-fashioned way
« Reply #64 on: October 27, 2007, 08:24:59 »
Rangers assert Arctic sovereignty the old-fashioned way

Don Martin, CanWest News Service
Published: Friday, October 26, 2007

Quote
The Conservative Arctic reclamation project calls for unmanned aerial drones, ocean floor sensors, $3 billion worth of new patrol ships, a deep sea port and an expanded military base to drape the Maple Leaf across vast stretches of barren rock, ice and increasingly open water.

But our current guardians on the ground are a paramilitary force that carry 60-year-old rifles to fend off polar bears, provide their own snow, land or sea transportation, call in irregularities over their personal satellite phones and exhaust their holidays to stand on guard for us.

The Canadian Rangers seem to have been overlooked as the most experienced hands-on and economical way to reassert sovereignty claims over a resource-laden region with heightened potential as a shipping corridor in a globally warmed environment.

The throne speech gave them a backhanded salute -- pledging to increase their numbers by 20 per cent while getting the name of the 4,100-strong quasi-military force wrong. Prime Minister Stephen Harper's address last week called them the Arctic Rangers, who don't actually exist.

But there's obvious potential to improve surveillance over a region claiming 75 per cent of Canada's coastline yet costs less than the sticker price for three light armored vehicles.

Even though they're not whining about it, the Canadian Rangers have an obvious lag in equipment and status when stacked against regular soldiers.

Instead of a uniform, these recruits get a red sweatshirt, T-shirt, ball cap, vest, compass, first- aid kit and, naturally, a toque. They're paid reservists' salary for the time they're on tour and must provide their own all-terrain vehicles, boats or snowmobiles to get around.

Baba Pedersen is the second family member in a three-generation string of Rangers from Kugluktuk, formerly known as Coppermine - an accomplishment that earned the trio their very own postage stamp. (And just to get the obligatory conflict of interest declaration out of the way, Pedersen is related to me through marriage.)

But one could argue the .303 Enfields issued to every Ranger are a tad out of date. "My rifle is World War I vintage, but it works well in the cold and is good for shooting caribou," Pedersen says with a laugh. "If you were standing half a mile away, I could still drop you with it."

He has noticed, but isn't complaining, that Canadian soldiers have the best communications equipment money can buy while Rangers are given old high-frequency radios.

"When the military guys come on our patrols, they come equipped with all sorts of satellite and other technology. We use the stuff while they're here, but when they go, so is the technology," he says. "That's why I usually bring my own phone along."

Pedersen's tours, done during his vacation period, take him on snowmobile dashes between the automated North Warning System outposts, calling reports into North Bay, Ont.'s command centre. In the pursuit of re-asserted sovereignty, "we plant flags, take some pictures and move on," he says.

Pedersen's reported the odd sailboat that seemed out of place in the sea ice (no kidding) and called in unusual aircraft or weather balloons.

Perhaps the Rangers' most notorious apprehension was a Romanian who last year bravely boated to Grise Fjord on Ellesmere Island from a port in Greenland, figuring he could mingle with the locals and eventually fly to Toronto unnoticed.

Unfortunately, he docked his boat 100 metres from a Ranger leader's home and didn't exactly blend into the local population, where he was only the second non-Inuit person in the community.

He was detained by the Rangers and deported.

Nobody's quite sure what the Harper government has in mind for the Rangers beyond increasing their size by 900 members in the years to come. There's a leadership session in Yellowknife in a couple weeks where they might get fresh marching orders. Or not.

But given the positive impact an aggressive recruitment and training blitz would have on a region sagging under chronic social problems and high unemployment, an upgrade would seem to be a win-win move for both the locals and faraway Ottawa decision-makers.

"We always say something isn't ours unless we're standing on it," says Capt. Conrad Schubert, spokesman for the Rangers program in Yellowknife, by way of explaining their role in protecting our sovereignty.

That makes this ragtag assortment of Inuit, who spend their vacations serving as our eyes and ears in a hostile but warming environment, Canada's best and brightest north stars.
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Offline Lantelin

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Re: The Canadian Rangers Merged Thread
« Reply #65 on: June 06, 2008, 12:08:00 »
When I joined the Rangers in '93, our full issue of kit consisted of 2 ball caps, an armband, and the .303. Oh, and the pull through and sling. If you wanted the red sweatshirts and t shirt, you had to buy them. I spent a lot of ranger pay in the surplus store back then. They've come a long way.

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Offline mainerjohnthomas

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Re: What do you really know about the Canadian Rangers?
« Reply #66 on: November 01, 2009, 16:08:46 »
All that being said,  I'm curious: what do you rangers DO? I understand you do "search and rescue" roles, but what about military exercises? what is your role in today's Big-Green-Machine? Just curious as to what the "job" of our Rangers is in today's world

Edit: Terrible grammar and spelling and composition

A long time ago I was a Sig with 744 Communications Regiment, but in the last year have returned to the colours with the 4CRPG Canadian Rangers (100 Mile).  I know that this question was asked a long time ago, but outside of the Western Spirit writeup I didn't see a lot of other information addressing the question.  The Canadian Rangers are a cross between militia units and the old "native auxilliaries" from the old British Empire.  The Rangers are the few scattered boots on the ground that serve the CF by providing local presence, knowledge of the local ground, support for law enforcement, disaster relief and search and rescue for those communities of the coast, the north, and the interior, where the CF cannot afford to have a presence.

What do we bring to the big green machine?  Boots on the ground, knowledge of the local area, of the local agencies like Search and Rescue, Law enforcement, Forest Service.  We know the differences between what the map says is passable, and what you can actually get through this month.  We know and work with all the local agencies that the CF will need to liaise with if they are called in to deal with a major problem.  The CF regular and reserve force units cannot be everywhere, and yet is tasked with being able to respond to crisis at any part of this vast nation.  In the northern and sparsely populated areas, the Rangers are the CF's eyes and hands in places it could never afford to staff.

You won't find us in Leopards and Lav's, for we are not Reg Force or Reserve.  You will find us on ATV and Skidoo, on canoe and on foot, scouting, providing search and rescue, law enforcement support, disaster relief, and any other tasking the CF Land Forces direct in those places that will never have an armory or reserve unit, let alone a regular force unit.

To all the Rangers who joined me at Albert Head for RV 09, good seeing so many in Cadpat and crimson from all over the Western provinces!
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Offline Bike to Live

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Canadian rangers
« Reply #67 on: May 23, 2011, 12:59:29 »
OK so from what I have read, the Canadian rangers are located in remote locations. And they supply you with a Enginfeild rifle and ammo.


Do you need a PAL (gun license) since you keep the weapon at home and I don't really understand how it works, if you keep the weapon at your home, that means you are prepared to patrol at anytime? It also says the rifle is so you can "sustain yourself" Does that mean they leave you in the middle of nowhere for you to hunt your own food?

This sounds like my dream job if  the last question is true.

Offline AmmoTech90

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Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #68 on: May 23, 2011, 13:44:19 »
Canadian Rangers normally live at home and operate as part of a Patrol.  They are not "located" or "left" anywhere at random.  They are Reservists and have specific duties.  They normally carry out those duties when "parading" and as a difference from normal reservists, they may execute some duties when going about their normal day to day routine (if it is outdoorsy type stuff).

Don't expect to join up and get given a rifle, parka, and skiddoo or ATV and left to your own devices.
Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabris, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam.

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Rewards a long day's toil
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Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #69 on: May 23, 2011, 14:09:19 »
You store your weapon according to the law. And then you are allowed to hunt with it in accordance to the provincial/territorial laws.

You wont get posted anywhere- they are recruited from their communities and remain there. Unless you move of your own choice. The training, while good, is limited. The provide a valuable service to their communities but it is not a dream job by any stretch.
Posted again...thats six in six.

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Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #70 on: May 23, 2011, 15:21:47 »
Do you live in a remote location - Sudbury or Port Alberni is not considered remote.  This is the first question you should ask yourself.

Normally members of First Nations are recruited as Canadian Rangers - as these are the communities to which such a patrol might be located.
Per Ardua Ad Astra

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Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #71 on: May 23, 2011, 15:28:05 »
I thought you wanted to join the U.S. Navy and get posted to warm places.   ???

Quote
Incase anyone is wondering, I plan to join the US Military instead of Canada becasue theirs is much larger and not underfunded.
Also you get to choose your specific job. Not to mention, you get stationed in places like Hawaii and Virginia Beach, Florida etc. Instead of Colder places.

http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,100761.msg1043594.html#msg1043594

If that's the case, I don't think the Canadian Rangers are your "dream" job.   ::)
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
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Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #72 on: May 23, 2011, 17:06:58 »
I thought you wanted to join the U.S. Navy and get posted to warm places.   ???

http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,100761.msg1043594.html#msg1043594

If that's the case, I don't think the Canadian Rangers are your "dream" job.   ::)

The "polar" opposite really.
Posted again...thats six in six.

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Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #73 on: May 23, 2011, 17:36:08 »
I thought you wanted to join the U.S. Navy and get posted to warm places.   ???

http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,100761.msg1043594.html#msg1043594

If that's the case, I don't think the Canadian Rangers are your "dream" job.   ::)

I like warm places, but surviving in a remote location is a huge dream of mine.

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Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #74 on: May 23, 2011, 17:37:04 »
The "polar" opposite really.


Thats a good pun.

 ::)