Author Topic: The Canadian Rangers Merged Thread  (Read 68984 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Container

  • BAMFNG
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 26,285
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 613
Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #75 on: May 23, 2011, 17:44:05 »
Well only one of us has been to the Arctic and Hawaii and worked with folks from the USN and the Rangers....I answered your question and threw in a bad joke. A crappy pun once in a while is the toll you pay for a pretty lame set of questions.

As for your "dream" of surviving in remote locations.......you might want to start small before taking you Lee Enfield into the arctic to survive on nothing but what you hunt. It isnt adventure tourism its hard work and dangerous.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2011, 17:47:30 by Container »
Posted again...thats six in six.

Offline helpup

  • How in hell did you manage to fit that in there?
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 8,755
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 407
  • Yah Yah is up there with Bud's as anoying.
Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #76 on: June 03, 2011, 13:17:49 »
I like warm places, but surviving in a remote location is a huge dream of mine.

 :cold:   ::)

Winning the lottery is a dream of mine.  The reality is I am better off saving money. 

Me thinks you need to find out more facts about the military be it Canadian or American.  Then have a look at your Romanticize ideals of it and think again how you want to proceed.
she turned me into a Newt!!

Offline Canadian.Trucker

  • Roadrunner Actual
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 12,449
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 574
    • G&SF Website
Re: Canadian rangers
« Reply #77 on: December 01, 2011, 16:03:55 »
OK so from what I have read, the Canadian rangers are located in remote locations. And they supply you with a Enginfeild rifle and ammo.


Do you need a PAL (gun license) since you keep the weapon at home and I don't really understand how it works, if you keep the weapon at your home, that means you are prepared to patrol at anytime? It also says the rifle is so you can "sustain yourself" Does that mean they leave you in the middle of nowhere for you to hunt your own food?

This sounds like my dream job if  the last question is true.
I am speaking of our (3CRPG) SOP's so other patrol groups might do things slightly different.
-The Enfields and ammo are kept in locked seacans.  They don't stay (as a rule) in Rangers homes, but the Rangers do have use of them for training and other purposes.  Since the Enfield is a CF weapon you do not require a PAL to handle one, all Rangers do receive formal training on the firearm though.
-You are not left in the middle of nowhere.  Each patrol is located within a community in the North and Rangers from that community form the patrol on a volunteer basis.  Each patrol has an establishment of 34 personnel.  The Enfield's are used more as a means of self-defence than an offensive weapon, so that when the Rangers are out doing their patrolling/SAR tasks they have something to defend themselves from predators.  Yes, the Rangers are prepared to deploy at anytime, but usually just withing the surrounding area of their home community on short notice.
Tenacious and Versatile-G & SF

"Nevermind, I'll do it myself" - Me

"We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm."
- George Orwell

Offline logical1

  • Guest
  • *
  • 20
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1
Service in the Canadian Rangers
« Reply #78 on: June 13, 2013, 19:55:36 »
Hey everyone,
Does anyone here serve with or has served with the Canadian Rangers before? In particular, does anyone have experience working with any of their more southern patrols (non-arctic)?

What was your experience with them? What was positive or negative? What do you think of the scope of the training they receive and the value they add to the Army?

Thanks in advance

Offline Canadian.Trucker

  • Roadrunner Actual
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 12,449
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 574
    • G&SF Website
Re: Service in the Canadian Rangers
« Reply #79 on: June 14, 2013, 09:06:49 »
Hey everyone,
Does anyone here serve with or has served with the Canadian Rangers before? In particular, does anyone have experience working with any of their more southern patrols (non-arctic)?

What was your experience with them? What was positive or negative? What do you think of the scope of the training they receive and the value they add to the Army?

Thanks in advance
Question #1 and #2- Yes

Have a read back through the rest of the posts, while the original post was created in 2004 it still provides good information on the basics of the Ranger program.  Right now within Ontario alone there are 590 Rangers divided between 23 communities.  Just like any military organization there are positives and negatives, but overall the Canadian Rangers are subject matter experts (SME's) of their area surrounding their home communities.  Granted traditional skills are fading somewhat with the newer generation, but it's interesting to note that the Canadian Forces and the Rangers have helped in maintaining these fieldcraft/bush skills and encouraging First Nations people maintain their traditional skills as it helps the community and CF personnel when we need to go into the area for training or real time domestic operations.

The training that the Rangers receive from the CF is in the form of a 7 day DP1 to give them basic military knowledge, weapons handling training, navigation, fieldcraft, first aid etc.  Rangers that have leadership potential or are in leadership roles also have the opportunity to attend a Patrol Commanders DP2 course to give them further training in the area of running a patrol.  However, Rangers are just that by virtue of where they live and their expertise of knowing the land in and around their community.  So while the DP1 is something that we're trying to have every Ranger be qualified it is not mandatory in order to be a Ranger.  As well we in Ontario conduct in community training and FTX's, combined training FTX's and other events within LFCA in support of units.  So the Rangers have quite a few opportunities to participate.
Tenacious and Versatile-G & SF

"Nevermind, I'll do it myself" - Me

"We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm."
- George Orwell

Offline bclinehand

  • Guest
  • *
  • 40
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2
Re: The Canadian Rangers Merged Thread
« Reply #80 on: April 29, 2014, 14:46:44 »
I am going to bring this one back to life.......

As i read through this thread it seems there is still a lot of "mystery" around what the Canadian Rangers do....

I am currently the Patrol Commander of the 100 Mile House Patrol ,our CoC is similar to a platoon sized unit in any other CAF army unit;

  Ranger (X 8)                                    Ranger(X 8)                                 Ranger(X 8)
Sec 2i/c (acting Cpl)                      Sec 2i/c (acting Cpl)                  Sec 2i/c (acting Cpl)           
Sec Comdr.(acting MCpl)               Sec Comdr.(acting MCpl)          Sec Comdr.(acting MCpl)
                                                                         
                                                       
                                                       Patrol 2I/C (acting Mcpl)
                                                       Patrol Commander (acting Sgt.)

You will notice that all Ranks (except Ranger) are acting.........what this means is they are paid at that rank while acting in that capacity but still remain at the original rank when dealing with other units in the CAF.

The Patrol Commander reports directly to a Ranger Instructor (RI) (Generally a Warrant Officer but sometimes a Sgt.) who is a full time member of our Company Hq.

So what do we do?  .......

In the past couple of Years I have been one of the instructors at the  Basic Wildernes Survival Course (BWST) for members of 3rd Div as wellas 39 Brigade put on at various locations by BC coy, recently I was at Camp Albert Head instructing members of 39 Brigade basics of Ground Search and Rescue (GSAR) for EX Cougar Ready2.

Several members of our Patrol are Canada Safety Council ATV/UTV and LOSV instructors who along with a qualified CAF instructor put on classes for other Rangers as well as various other units in BC.

So you can see that as wellas providing the traditional "Eyes and Ears" of the CAF in remote and sparsely populated areas of Canada the Rangers are starting to be used more ane more ........especially now that the focus of the CAF is shifting to a more DOMOP role.

If you have any Questions pleas postthem up and I'll answer what I can ....

Offline Parabellum02

  • Guest
  • *
  • 290
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3
Re: The Canadian Rangers Merged Thread
« Reply #81 on: November 30, 2017, 11:55:59 »
Hi all, I have a few questions regarding the Canadian Rangers, but I want to give a tiny bit of backstory so you understand why I'm asking. First of all, I have successfully completed the application process of the army reserves in my area, however shortly after being sworn in, a medical issue regarding mild asthma has occurred and it is possible I will no longer be eligible to continue to serve. That being said, I still have a burning desire to serve in this country's military one way or another, and that's why I have looked to the Rangers. Based on what I've read, there aren't really any medical standards in the Rangers, so my asthma shouldn't be a problem, therefore it is the only possible option left to do what I've always wanted.

As for the question;

If one wanted to join the Rangers who wasn't currently living in an isolated area in Canada, what would have to happen? Would I have to attempt to move to one of these isolated areas? which community would be the easiest to move to from southern Ontario? What are my chances of getting accepted once I arrive? Is having a snowmobile an absolute necessity, or is it strongly preferred? I understand that Rangers must have lots of personal knowledge of the community they are apart of, as well as lots of outdoor skills (hunting, fishing, building shelter etc). But surly if someone had a good attitude, was willing to work extremely hard, and had a passion for it, there could be someway for it to happen. I just need a little bit of guidance on the situation, preferably from someone who is, or was a Ranger, or at least has experience with the program itself. Thanks!

Offline Chad.wiseman

  • Guest
  • *
  • 625
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6
Rangers
« Reply #82 on: January 30, 2018, 19:40:24 »
Wondering if anyone had issues moving from Canadian rangers into reservist?  The recruitment Center has been a few months trying to determine the appropriate mechanism to process my application due to my service in the rangers.   I had thought it would make it easier not harder..

Online Blackadder1916

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 164,665
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,831
Re: Rangers
« Reply #83 on: January 30, 2018, 20:25:30 »
Wondering if anyone had issues moving from Canadian rangers into reservist?  The recruitment Center has been a few months trying to determine the appropriate mechanism to process my application due to my service in the rangers.   I had thought it would make it easier not harder..


As a Ranger, you are already a Reservist; the Canadian Rangers are one of the sub-components of the Reserves.  As I assume that you are wishing to transfer to the Primary Reserve, then the following DAOD covers who is responsible for the administration of the transfer.
 
DAOD 5002-3, Component and Sub-Component Transfer
http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/about-policies-standards-defence-admin-orders-directives-5000/5002-3.page#res

Since the responsible organization would be the gaining unit, that may explain why a recruiting centre is in the dark.  They would only be responsible if one was CTing to the Reg Force.
Whisky for the gentlemen that like it. And for the gentlemen that don't like it - Whisky.

Offline AbdullahD

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 18,830
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 373
Canadian Rangers
« Reply #84 on: February 12, 2018, 17:31:49 »
Okay guys, I need some schooling here. Here is the question what is or are the Canadian Rangers and how does it differ or does it differ from the regular reserves?

From what I understand, which could be completely messed up is that..
1) the Canadian Rangers are a part of the Canadian forces, but are not regular force nor reserve force.
2) the Canadian Rangers are not required to go through BMQ but are DP1? Qualified? (Sorry do not know the difference guys) they are only required to have a 10 day orientation and then attend 'x' amount of meetings per year and 'x' amount of training trips per year.
3) part of their function is 'artic sovereignty expeditions', SAR functions and natural disaster response too ie the willys pond forest fire blockades.
4) you are paid rent for any materials you use from your own house and daily pay is comparable to reserve force pay.
5) standard background checks etc are applicable, but are there physical fitness standards too if so what are they??
6) Canadian Rangers can only be tasked for domestic services and not able to be sent overseas?
7) is there any federal protection of rangers for time spent out of work in service to the crown? Or is it not protected and you have to sweet talk your boss yourself.
8) does the pension, medical or other benefits exist with the rangers and can they transfer to reg force as well?

I did Google it and only came up with a scant few pages on the government website.  Most of the conversation (read all) that I found here was regarding the new rifle purchase and decision... so if i missed it on here I am sorry, but I am truly curious about this. My job pays very good compared to the reg force, making me inclined to keep it and with no reserves as I understand them close to here this could be an option to fulfill my desire to serve my country.

As always thanks guys
Abdullah

Offline EpicBeardedMan

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 9,491
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 462
  • Getting better, stronger, faster.
Re: Canadian Rangers
« Reply #85 on: February 12, 2018, 17:36:51 »
All of the information youre looking for is here:

http://www.army-armee.forces.gc.ca/en/canadian-rangers/index.page

frequently asked questions is useful as well on that page.
The military isn't really like a James Bond movie where you go for jet training in the morning and then underwater demolitions after lunch.

Offline AbdullahD

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 18,830
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 373
Re: Canadian Rangers
« Reply #86 on: February 12, 2018, 18:10:22 »
All of the information youre looking for is here:

http://www.army-armee.forces.gc.ca/en/canadian-rangers/index.page

frequently asked questions is useful as well on that page.

My epically bearded friend, I am afraid it is not or I am especially handicapped in reading today. Reading the 4 pages this topic was merged into, updated me with Canadian Ranger history, some of which I was aware of due to my looking and it also clarified that the rangers are reservists but confused me further because they apparently do not need to do bmq but are still considered reservists.. as per my other queries I can not see the answers, not saying that they are not there but reading over those government pages 3 times and these 4 pages. I am still confused, but I am a simple guy too.. so maybe for a simple guy like myself if someone could spell it out I'd appreciate it.. sorry.

Abdullah

Offline AbdullahD

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 18,830
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 373
Re: The Canadian Rangers Merged Thread
« Reply #87 on: February 26, 2018, 21:18:47 »
1- no bmq is needed but is a division of the reserves, that recruits back woods experienced or otherwise qualified individuals.
(Just seems really weird to me)

2- 10 day initiation course, 10 day leadership course and then excursions throughout the year to help train if needed. They want general orienteering and back woods knowledge preferably.

3- part of their function is 'artic sovereignty expeditions', SAR functions and natural disaster response too ie the willys pond forest fire blockades. = correct

4- you are paid rent for any materials you use from your own house and daily pay is comparable to reserve force pay.= correct enough for me. Starting pay is $100/day before any equipment rents ie gas, truck use, atv use etc

5- standard background checks etc are applicable, but are there physical fitness standards too if so what are they. None known aside from general healthiness.

6- Canadian Rangers can only be tasked for domestic services and not able to be sent overseas = correct from what I understand.

7- reserve force participation is protected by Canadian law but does have a few flaws https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/labour-standards/reports/reservist-leave.html

8- does the pension, medical or other benefits exist with the rangers and can they transfer to reg force as well. = mostly no, but if injured on an exercise they will cover you medically.

Just posting here just in case others care
Abdullah