Author Topic: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Air Force  (Read 158162 times)

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Offline Baden Guy

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Re: IL-76: A Massive Russian-built Cargo Plane hits fence on take off
« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2007, 15:10:03 »
CADORS Number: 2007O0755

International Aviation
Narrative: UPDATE from TSB Daily Notification Log Occurrence Summary A07O0119: The Silk Way Airlines Ilyushin IL-76 aircraft, registration 4K-AZ41, operating as flight AZQ4992, was on an ILS approach to runway 24 at the Trenton Air Force Base in Trenton, Ontario. The weather at the time was reported as one half mile in fog, vertical visibility 500 feet, RVR 600, temperature and dew point 12 degrees celsius and the wind was 210 at 06 knots. The aircraft struck the airport perimeter fence with the main landing gear and briefly touched down on the left main landing gear approximately 430 feet from the threshold of runway 24. The flight crew aborted the landing and applied engine power. The aircraft climbed to 3000 feet asl and entered a hold at this altitude. After approximately one hour it diverted to the Ottawa/MacDonald-Cartier airport. Ottawa tower was contacted by Trenton and advised of the incoming aircraft and that it had struck the fence on approach. Ottawa tower called out ARFF as a precaution. The AZQ 4992 flight crew did not declare an emergency. The aircraft landed uneventfully and taxied to the local FBO. ARFF followed the aircraft and assisted the crew in removing the barbed wire that was wrapped around the left main landing gear. After a period of time the aircraft took off from Ottawa and arrived in Trenton where the onboard cargo was offloaded. TSB, Transport Canada, and the Canadian Forces Directorate of Flight Safety (DFS) were notified of the event. DFS will be the lead in the investigation with TSB participating and providing support. Examination of the aircraft revealed substantial damage to the underside of the fuselage as a result of the impact with the fence. The TSB have made this occurrence an accident since it had substantial damage.

Offline BYT Driver

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Re: IL-76: A Massive Russian-built Cargo Plane hits fence on take off
« Reply #26 on: June 10, 2007, 16:08:49 »
BG, Thanks for the info and killing of rumours.  I've been around these guys, so it doesn't surprise me at all.
 :army:

Offline Thucydides

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Re: IL-76: A Massive Russian-built Cargo Plane hits fence on take off
« Reply #27 on: June 10, 2007, 17:24:37 »
Gee, I'm shocked... ;)  This has happened once or twice before:

http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,35058.msg276930.html#msg276930

And cynics wonder why I don't support use of Russian/East bloc aircraft as our main strategic transport means...

I think the problem lies more with the Russian/Eastbloc aircrew..........
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

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Re: IL-76: A Massive Russian-built Cargo Plane hits fence on take off
« Reply #28 on: June 10, 2007, 18:46:56 »
The AZQ 4992 flight crew did not declare an emergency.

They didn't even spill their Vodka!
There's a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot.

Offline Teddy Ruxpin

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Re: IL-76: A Massive Russian-built Cargo Plane hits fence on take off
« Reply #29 on: June 10, 2007, 23:34:38 »
I think the problem lies more with the Russian/Eastbloc aircrew..........

Certainly - my comment was directed at our use of contracted lift.  Skylink's original proposal had us contracting (basically) all our lift to them.  There's been no suggestion (IIRC) that the CF fly Russian aircraft. 
A man may fight for many things. His country, his friends, his principles, the glistening tear on the cheek of a golden child. But personally, I'd mud-wrestle my own mother for a ton of cash, an amusing clock and a sack of French porn.

Dulce bellum inexpertis.

Offline Globesmasher

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Re: IL-76: A Massive Russian-built Cargo Plane hits fence on take off
« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2007, 11:53:35 »
G2G:

Thanks for posting the CADORS link - that was a good read.

Some nice approach planning by the crew - they set themselves up (even though they had a 1/2 mile reported ground vis) for a CAT I approach with an RVR of 600 feet and a vertical vis of 500 feet.  Interesting.  There's an approach ban for CAT II with a single RVR (A) of < 1200 feet which begs the question, "Hhhmmm, what are my chances of even making this approach on CAT I minima when CAT II minima don't exist at the time???".

How could they possibly hope to see a thing from 200 & 1/2 in those conditions??

Bummer.  :P  Oh well ....... at least nobody was hurt.

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Re: IL-76: A Massive Russian-built Cargo Plane hits fence on take off
« Reply #31 on: June 11, 2007, 17:41:42 »
G2G:

Thanks for posting the CADORS link - that was a good read.

Some nice approach planning by the crew - they set themselves up (even though they had a 1/2 mile reported ground vis) for a CAT I approach with an RVR of 600 feet and a vertical vis of 500 feet.  Interesting.  There's an approach ban for CAT II with a single RVR (A) of < 1200 feet which begs the question, "Hhhmmm, what are my chances of even making this approach on CAT I minima when CAT II minima don't exist at the time???".

How could they possibly hope to see a thing from 200 & 1/2 in those conditions??

Bummer.  :P  Oh well ....... at least nobody was hurt.

I read it that way as well and had to ask myself if the crew even had to right plates or plates at all. Remember reading about that Flying tigers air B747 that crashed in Kuala Lumpur because they flew an ILS using an NDB plate ?

Offline Flatspin

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Re: IL-76: A Massive Russian-built Cargo Plane hits fence on take off
« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2007, 23:26:13 »
The aircraft climbed to 3000 feet asl and entered a hold at this altitude. After approximately one hour it diverted to the Ottawa/MacDonald-Cartier airport.

Hold for an hour ?  :o Glad I wasn't paying that bill !

Offline 3rd Herd

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The Russian Bears Are Back?
« Reply #33 on: July 24, 2007, 18:59:33 »
The Usual Disclaimer
Mods free to move or delate

AFX News Limited
Russian bombers spotted over North Sea; UK, Norwegian fighter jets scramble
07.20.07, 9:01 AM ET

OSLO (Thomson Financial) - British and Norwegian fighter jets scrambled over the North Sea after Russian bombers were spotted flying at 'unusual' latitudes overnight, the Norwegian military said today.

The repeated sightings of Russian jets -- the most numerous off Norway's coast since the end of the Cold War according to Norwegian public radio NRK -- came amid an escalating diplomatic crisis between Russia and Britain.
In the third incident of its kind this week, Norwegian jets were again called out early this morning as another two Russian bombers were spotted close to Norwegian airspace, the military said.

Two Russian TU95 Bear bombers were first detected overnight Thursday in international airspace between Stavanger, southeastern Norway, and the Scottish town Aberdeen, Norwegian army spokesman Lieutenant Colonel Jon Inge Oegland told Agence France-Presse.

'It is a little unusual. It's been a long time since we saw Russian aircraft this far south,' he said.

Norway sent two F-16 fighters 'to identify the aircraft and to mark the Norwegian airspace,' he said, adding that Britain also dispatched aircraft to the scene.

The Russian bombers then turned back.

Hours later, two Russian TU160 Blackjack bombers were observed flying westwards, west of the Barents Sea, early this morning, again prompting the Norwegian military to dispatch F-16s, Oegland said.

'Both times the Russian bombers stayed within international airspace the entire time. They didn't do anything wrong,' Oegland stressed.

'It would be pure speculation to guess why they did what they did.'

Two Russian TU95 Bear bombers were detected in the Norwegian Sea off northwestern Norway on Tuesday. Oslo and London scrambled fighters but the Russian planes turned back on their own, the Norwegian military said.
http://www.forbes.com/business/feeds/afx/2007/07/20/afx3935202.html

Also:

"July 20, 2007: In an unusual surge of activity, there were three groups of long range Tu-95 or Tu-160 aircraft in the air off the north Russian coast this weel.  It was only last year that the air force resumed long range flights over the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans. About a hundred of these flights were carried out last year, mainly by Tu-95MS and Tu-160 heavy bombers. Russia has also increased the number of heavy bomber crews it is training, with 42 new crews entering service in 2006. Russia has about 50 operational Tu-95s and about sixteen Tu-160s. Both bombers can, with in-flight refueling, reach any place on the planet. The Norwegian air force keeps two armed F-16 fighters on constant alert to go escort Russian aircraft that fly just outside Norwegian airspace. Britain also keeps fighters on alert to meet the Russian aircraft when they near British air space."http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/russia/articles/20070722.aspx

The Russians are back
MICHAEL HOWIE
HOME AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT
20-Jul-07 00:04 BST
RUSSIAN bombers were yesterday intercepted off Scotland by RAF Tornado aircraft after encroaching into UK airspace in an incident reminiscent of the Cold War.
The Ministry of Defence said that two Tu-95 "Bear" bombers briefly entered British airspace at about 2am, but turned back after British F-3s, part of the RAF's Quick Reaction Alert, intercepted them.
A spokesman did not specify where the interception took place, but reports said they were over oilfields close to the morth-east coast.

About three hours later, two Russian Tu-160 strategic bombers reached the fringes of British airspace and returned to base after Tornados were once again scrambled from RAF Leeming in Yorkshire.

The incidents took place two days after RAF planes were forced to approach Russian bombers as they headed toward British airspace.

Colonel Alexander Drobyshevsky, a Russian Air Force spokesman, said British planes approaching bombers on training flights was "normal".

But such a spate of incidents, which were commonplace during the Cold War as military aircraft carried out reconnaissance on enemy installations, has been described as "highly unusual" by aviation experts, and occurred amid heightened diplomatic tensions between Russia and Britain over Moscow's refusal to extradite a murder suspect.

A spokesman for the MoD said that "to have three launches in one week is unusual... but to connect these with anything happening in London would be speculation".

However, Jim Ferguson, an aviation writer, said it was possible the incidents were linked to the ongoing diplomatic row, adding: "The only people who will know whether the Russians are flexing their muscles as a result of the diplomatic spat will be those in the Kremlin."

He said the Tu-160 approach was "unusual", but there was "nothing new" in Bear reconnaissance flights
Meanwhile, Andrei Lugovoy, the suspect in the radiation poisoning death of the Kremlin foe and former KGB officer, Alexander Litvinenko, yesterday claimed London provoked the current confrontation to hide a lack of evidence.

In a radio interview, Mr Lugovoy said he was prepared to face British prosecutors in Russia but will not leave his country for fear that he could be arrested at the behest of Britain.

The interview, in which he called British accusations of a lack of co-operation "a cynical and impudent lie", came a day after Russia's decision to expel diplomats, stop issuing visas for British officials and halt counter-terrorism co-operation.

The moves followed Britain's announcement on Monday that it was expelling four Russian diplomats, restricting visas issued to Russian government officials and reviewing interaction on a range of issues, in what it said was a necessary response to Moscow's refusal to co-operate.

This article: http://news.scotsman.com/uk.cfm?id=1138812007


http://news.scotsman.com/uk.cfm?id=1138812007

Increased Russian military activity in the North
Norwegian jet fighters were three times this week scrambled to meet Russian bombers which flew close to the Norwegian coast. The flights are seen as part of a Russian military exercise.


 
/ np
 21.07.2007 07:59
 On Tuesday the Russian Tupolev (Bear) bombers flew down to Troendelag before turning back north.
In the early hours of Friday morning they were escorted by Norwegian jet fighters as far down as the waters between Stavanger and Aberdeen, before returning to Russia.

On Friday morning another two bombers approached the coast of Finnmark, when they were met by Norwegian jet fighters, and turned back out to sea.

The Norwegian Defence has seen an increased activity by Russian military aircraft along the Norwegian coast over the last couple of years.

- There has been a gradual increase in the activity since the down-period of the Russian Defence in the middle of the 1990's, says Defence spokesman John Inge Oeglaend.

- We must go back to the Soviet era to find such high (military) activity on land, sea and in the air, says Deputy leader of the Barents Secretariat, Thomas Nilsen.

Defence experts see this as a sign that the Russian military forces now have more money to spend on preparedness.
This week the Russians ended their annual summer exercise in the northern region.

As part of the NATO preparedness agreement, Norway always has two fully armed jet fighters on full alert at the Bodoe Air Base, ready for take-off.http://www.norwaypost.no/cgi-bin/norwaypost/imaker?id=91770









« Last Edit: August 27, 2007, 11:58:20 by Bruce Monkhouse »
"if he was to be hanged for it, he told his brother, he could not accuse a man whom he believed had meant well, and whose error was one of judgment, not of intention"
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Offline FifthHorse

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #34 on: August 09, 2007, 13:48:14 »
I was about to start a new thread, but figured this fit well here.
Usual disclaimers and such...

Russia sparks Cold War scramble 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6938856.stm
 
The Tu-95 pilots exchanged smiles with their US counterparts
Russian bombers have flown to the US island of Guam in the Pacific in a surprise manoeuvre reminiscent of the Cold War era.


Two Tu-95 turboprops flew this week to Guam, home to a big US military base, Russian Maj Gen Pavel Androsov said. They "exchanged smiles" with US pilots who scrambled to track them, he added.

The sorties, believed to be the first since the Cold War ended, come as Russia stresses a more assertive foreign policy, correspondents say.

The flight is part of a pattern of more expansive Russian military operations in recent weeks, says BBC diplomatic correspondent Jonathan Marcus.

Old practice

Gen Androsov said the strategic bombers had flown 13 hours from their base in the Russian Far East during the exercise.

"It has always been the tradition of our long-range aviation to fly far into the ocean, to meet [US] aircraft carriers and greet [US pilots] visually," he said at a news conference.

"Yesterday [Wednesday] we revived this tradition, and two of our young crews paid a visit to the area of the base of Guam," he said.

"I think the result was good. We met our colleagues - fighter jet pilots from [US] aircraft carriers. We exchanged smiles and returned home," he added.

During the Cold War, Soviet bombers regularly flew long-haul missions to areas patrolled by Nato and the US.

The bombers have the capability of launching a nuclear strike with the missiles they carry.
END ARTICLE

Seems the Russian's are getting real frisky lately.
"You play to win the game!" Herman Edwards

Offline Colin P

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #35 on: August 09, 2007, 13:50:49 »
Ah they just want to exchange smiles and waves, perhaps the West should do the same. On th plus side it might breath some life back into NATO.

Offline geo

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #36 on: August 09, 2007, 14:08:53 »
Just a smile and a wave..... with a little side order of bravado to go along with everything :)
Chimo!

Offline karl28

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #37 on: August 09, 2007, 14:12:50 »
             It would appear that the bear is back out of hibernation

Offline Greymatters

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #38 on: August 09, 2007, 14:42:19 »
Although the routes are different, and the countries approached vary, Bear (Tu-95) or Russian Bear (refering to the country) air activity is nothing new... 

Try reading here for a summary of publicly released information on Russian Strategic Aviation exercises.
http://www.nti.org/db/nisprofs/russia/weapons/maneuver.htm

Offline karl28

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #39 on: August 09, 2007, 18:14:46 »
GreyMatter 
 
Thanks for the link . I just skimed over it briefly didn't realize how active they have been I heard the odd story on the evening news the past year or two but that was about it .    IT makes you wonder if we are headed back to a cold war scenario again

Offline Greymatters

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #40 on: August 09, 2007, 18:44:53 »
Most say the Cold War is over, but I'm not one of them.  It may have thawed out for a while politically, and some tactics have changed, but no matter how many cosmetic changes are made some things havent changed since 1991.   

Offline geo

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #41 on: August 09, 2007, 19:13:49 »
The russiona bear has been dancing a fair bit lately.  Mr Putin has been consolidating and flexing his economic muscle.  Flexing some military muscle will allow his troops to "feel good" and let his neighbours sweat a little.....
Eg:  That little missle attack that russia did not fire into Georgia.
Chimo!

Offline karl28

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #42 on: August 11, 2007, 10:40:55 »
GreyMatter
           Yeah I am starting to agree with what your saying also Geo makes a good point to about Putin flexing is muscle where he can .   But should be in for some interesting times ahead

Offline 3rd Herd

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #43 on: August 11, 2007, 11:21:50 »
The usual disclaimer:
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=6486

Russia holds strategic air drills over Arctic
August 8, 2007
RIA Novosti 
Russia's strategic aviation started Wednesday an active phase of military exercises to fly over the North Pole and conduct test launches of cruise missiles, an Air Force spokesman said.

During the active phase, four Tu-160 Blackjack, 12 Tu-95 Bear-H strategic bombers, and 14 Tu-22 Backfire-C theater bombers will conduct simulated bombing raids, and more than ten cruise missile launches at the Pemboi range near Vorkuta [in Russia's Arctic], and fly over the North Pole, the Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans.

"On Wednesday, Tu-160 and Tu-95 bombers conducted eight successful [test] launches of cruise missiles at designated targets in northern Russia," Colonel Alexander Drobyshevsky said, adding that the planes made over 40 sorties throughout the day.

The Russian aircraft were closely monitored by NATO fighters during the missions.

The spokesman said six long-range aviation regiments were involved in the exercise to practice interaction with fighter aircraft, air refueling, and overcoming enemy air defenses.

Units of the 37th Air Army of the Strategic Command will conduct a total of six tactical exercises in August as part of an annual training program, the Defense Ministry earlier said in a statement.

According to various sources, the Russian Air Force currently deploys 141 Tu-22M3 bombers, 40 Tu-95MS bombers, and 14 Tu-160 planes.

Edit to add:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/08/09/AR2007080900402.html

Russian bomber jets resume Cold War sorties
By Dmitry Solovyov
Reuters
Thursday, August 9, 2007; 11:45 AM
".............President Vladimir Putin has sought to make Russia more assertive in the world. Putin has boosted defense spending and sought to raise morale in the armed forces, which were starved of funding following the fall of the Soviet Union.

Androsov said the sortie by the two turboprop Tu-95MS bombers, from a base near Blagoveshchensk in the Far East, had lasted for 13 hours. The Tu-95, codenamed "Bear" by NATO, is Russia's Cold War icon and may stay in service until 2040.

"I think the result was good. We met our colleagues -- fighter jet pilots from (U.S.) aircraft carriers. We exchanged smiles and returned home," Androsov said.

Ivan Safranchuk, Moscow office director of the Washington-based World Security Institute, said he saw nothing extraordinary in Moscow sending its bombers around the globe.

"This practice as such never stopped, it was only scaled down because there was less cash available for that," he said.

"It doesn't cost much to flex your muscles ... You can burn fuel flying over your own land or you can do it flying somewhere like Guam, in which case political dividends will be higher."

COLD WAR CAT-AND-MOUSE

The bombers give Russia the capability of launching a devastating nuclear strike even if the nuclear arsenals on its own territory are wiped out.

During the Cold War, they played elaborate airborne games of cat-and-mouse with Western air forces.

Lieutenant-General Igor Khvorov, air forces chief of staff, said the West would have to come to terms with Russia asserting its geopolitical presence. "But I don't see anything unusual, this is business as usual," he said.

The generals said under Putin long-range aviation was no longer in need of fuel, enjoyed better maintenance and much higher wages, a far cry from the 1990s when many pilots were practically grounded because there was no money to buy fuel.

The generals quipped that part of the funding boost was thanks to a five-hour sortie Putin once flew as part of a crew on a supersonic Tupolev Tu-160 strategic bomber, known as the "White Swan" in Russia and codenamed "Blackjack" by NATO.
The current state of Russia's economy, which is booming for the eighth year in a row, has allowed Russia to finance such flights, said Safranchuk from the World Security Institute.

"Maintenance and training are not the most expensive budget items of modern armies. Purchases of new weapons really are."





« Last Edit: August 11, 2007, 11:30:20 by 3rd Herd »
"if he was to be hanged for it, he told his brother, he could not accuse a man whom he believed had meant well, and whose error was one of judgment, not of intention"
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Offline Nerf herder

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #44 on: August 11, 2007, 11:27:47 »
Never trust a Commie! Said that back on 9th of November, 1989...    ;D

Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who kept their swords.--Ben Franklin

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #45 on: August 11, 2007, 11:32:18 »


 and 14 Tu-22M Backfire-C theater bombers

Correction in red....the Russians no longer fly the Tu-22 Blinder but only the Tu-22M Backfire.  Very big difference.

Offline 3rd Herd

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The Russian bear is back
« Reply #46 on: August 14, 2007, 17:39:15 »
.........."In one crucial sense, the bear never went away. Although Russia’s navy has been rusting in dock for more than a decade, and though its army has shrunk in size and very nearly collapsed in morale after its setbacks in the Chechen wars, the nuclear-armed strategic rocket forces have retained much of their traditional power to awe and to deter. Russia remains the only country that could, in theory, destroy organized life in the United States."

"Yet a further signal of Russia’s bold new strategic posture was the announcement by navy Commander Adm. Vladimir Masorin of a massive rebuilding of the Russian fleet. Masorin, who also promised the return of a “permanent naval presence” in the Mediterranean Sea, said last month Russia was rebuilding an industrial base to build six new aircraft carriers over the next 20 years.

Russia can certainly afford it, so long as energy prices remain close to their current high levels. Dmitri Medvedev, who combines the jobs of being chairman of the Gazprom energy giant and also first deputy prime minister, told Germany’s Stern magazine last week that Gazprom “could become the world's most valuable company.”

"Gazprom has the largest natural gas reserves in the world. When I joined the board of directors (in 2000), the concern was worth about $8 billion, but today it is more than $250 billion,” Medvedev said.

At current U.S. prices, a fleet of six carriers, along with their aircraft and the training costs of pilots, would cost in the region of $150 billion, about the current level of Russia’s national infrastructure fund. But Russia is spending a great deal more than that..........."

Source:

Walker's World: The Russian bear is back
http://www.upi.com/International_Security/Emerging_Threats/Analysis/2007/08/13/walkers_world_the_russian_bear_is_back/8777/

edit to add:

"During his recent trip to Severodvinsk, Russian First Deputy Premier Sergei Ivanov was shown plans for a new $500 million dock designed to build large-tonnage ships at the Zvyozdochka ship repair yard. Earlier, such large ships could only be built in Nikolayev, Ukraine. The dock, the Russian shipbuilding agency said, is needed to build gas carriers -- ships to transport Russian liquefied natural gas to Western partners.

The same dock could also build aircraft carriers. At any rate, the project is already on the drawing board. Adm. Vladimir Masorin said the craft would be a nuclear-powered ship not less than 100 meters long and would carry an air wing of 30 combat fighter jets and helicopters. But this is not going to be soon.

The outlook is best for submarines. Recently, two Project 667BDRM boats have been modernized, and two more submarines are being repaired and upgraded at Severodvinsk. A new sonar system is being installed to enable them to "see" and "hear" better. Other equipment includes new firefighting systems, nuclear reactor protection devices and the RSM-54 Sineva strategic missile system. Unlike its predecessor, the Skif, the Sineva carries 10 independently targetable re-entry vehicles instead of four. The new missile has a longer range and a modern control system.........."
http://www.upi.com/International_Security/Industry/Analysis/2007/08/02/outside_view_russias_next_navy__part_2/8202/


 
"if he was to be hanged for it, he told his brother, he could not accuse a man whom he believed had meant well, and whose error was one of judgment, not of intention"
Wellington

Offline 3rd Herd

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #47 on: August 14, 2007, 17:51:16 »
This week:
"Russian bombers train over North Pole- 2007-08-14

The Russia Air Force yesterday started a five-day training mission in the North Atlantic. A total of 30 planes take part in the training, part of which will take place over the North Pole, NRK reports.

The participating planes are of bombers typed Tu-95, Tu-22 as well as the fuelling aircraft Il-78, NTB reports for Norwegian Broadcasting NRK.

The training comes less than a week after Russian bombers flew all the way towards the US island Guam in the Pacific Ocean and less than a month after the bombers went south through the Barents Sea down towards the UK, NTB reports."
http://www.barentsobserver.com/index.php?id=527838&cat=16149&xforceredir=1&noredir=1

"One Russian air force officer, who asked not to be identified, told agencies he expected US interceptors would once again make their presence felt during this week's exercises.

"It is a traditional practice for military pilots to see foreign pilots come up to meet them and say to hello," he said.

"The United States are aware of our exercise," he added. Russia's long-range bombers have been involved in a number of other exercises in recent months.

On July 20, Norway and Britain scrambled its fighter planes after Norway detected Russian bombers flying over the North sea between Norway and Britain.

About 20 Russian aircraft will take part in the polar exercises: TU-95s (Tupolevs) a long-range strategic bomber; TU-22s, the strategic supersonic bomber most used by Russia; and Il-78s (Ilyushins), a four-engine aerial refuelling aircraft."
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/World/Rest_of_World/Russian_nuclear_bombers_hold_exercises_over_North_Pole/articleshow/2281387.cms

"if he was to be hanged for it, he told his brother, he could not accuse a man whom he believed had meant well, and whose error was one of judgment, not of intention"
Wellington

Offline Cdn Blackshirt

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #48 on: August 14, 2007, 22:05:46 »
Mental Note:  Add AEGIS systems to shopping list for next-gen Navy-operated Heavy Icebreakers.


Matthew.    :salute:
IMPORTANT - 'Blackshirt' is a reference to Nebraska Cornhuskers Football and not naziism.   National Champions '70, '71, '94, '95 and '97.    Go Huskers!!!!

Offline 3rd Herd

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Re: Bears Back In the Air?
« Reply #49 on: August 15, 2007, 17:21:30 »
Mental Note:  Add AEGIS systems to shopping list for next-gen Navy-operated Heavy Icebreakers.


Matthew.    :salute:

Norway is one set ahead of you/us.
BMD Watch: LM wins Norway Aegis contract
By MARTIN SIEFF
UPI Senior News Analyst
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14 (UPI) -- Lockheed Martin announced Tuesday it has won a $23 million contract for follow-on technical and logistics support services for Norway’s Aegis weapon system-equipped F310-class frigates.

“Under the contract, Lockheed Martin will provide a full range of engineering, technical, logistics and configuration management support services to maintain and enhance the performance and operational effectiveness of the Aegis computer systems on all five F310-class ships,” the company said in a statement................http://www.upi.com/International_Security/Industry/Analysis/2007/08/14/bmd_watch_lm_wins_norway_aegis_contract/9440/

"if he was to be hanged for it, he told his brother, he could not accuse a man whom he believed had meant well, and whose error was one of judgment, not of intention"
Wellington