Author Topic: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)  (Read 1376500 times)

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4200 on: September 20, 2017, 13:26:50 »
Wonder if our gov't paying attention:

Quote
Pentagon’s F-35 deep dive to drive lower costs on block buy deal

The Pentagon’s director of defense pricing is helping the F-35 joint program office nail down a better deal on a block buy, the program head said Monday.

Earlier this year, Shay Assad, the official charged with scrutinizing the price of weapon programs, announced that his office would conduct a “deep dive” to find the “true cost” of the joint strike fighter. The effort would focus on delayering the supply chain and incentivizing second-tier suppliers onward to invest their own money to make production more efficient.

In an exclusive Sept. 18 interview with Defense News, Vice Adm. Mat Winter said Assad has already started making recommendations to the joint program office, or JPO, that are influencing contract negotiations, particularly the block buy that will encompass lots 12, 13 and 14...

Lockheed is set to submit its proposal in the spring or summer of 2018, but Winter wants to see it faster, he said.

Jeff Babione, Lockheed’s executive vice president for the F-35 program, said the company plans to present its block buy proposal early next year, and although he is optimistic on the timing, it will take a lot of work to finalize negotiations for three production batches...
https://www.defensenews.com/digital-show-dailies/air-force-association/2017/09/20/pentagons-f-35-deep-dive-to-drive-lower-costs-on-block-buy-deal/

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4201 on: September 25, 2017, 17:24:50 »
Main IDF operational requirements rather different than RCAF's (NORAD):

Quote
Israeli lawmakers validate acquisition of 50 F-35s, but pledge stringent review before follow-on buys

Parliamentary findings released Monday on long-term planning within the Israeli military validated the nation’s need for 50 F-35 Adir fighter jets, yet urged a comprehensive review of alternatives — including drones and “other sources of precision fire” — before a government decision to purchase another 25 to 50 aircraft, as requested by the Israeli Air Force.

“The Adir is not just another platform, but brings new capabilities to the battlefield due to its stealth,” members of a parliamentary subcommittee found following a two-year review of the Israel Defense Forces‘ multiyear organization and spending plan.

In a section devoted to the Air Force, lawmakers noted that the F-35, “with all the existing limitations and against anti-aircraft missiles projected in the future, returns the Israel Air Force, through proper planning and with the recognition of its vulnerability points, to a capability for ‘stand-in’ operations.”

While lawmakers endorsed the government’s recent actions to acquire another 17 aircraft and thereby ensure two full stealth squadrons for the Air Force, they insisted follow-on purchases must be assessed in terms of how they contribute to national defense policy relative to alternatives.

Israel finalized last month an agreement with the U.S. government and F-35 prime contractor Lockheed Martin for another 17 planes. It was the third tranche of F-35 contracts, following an order for 19 aircraft in 2010 and another 14 F-35s in 2015.

“This does not detract from the vast professionalism of the Israel Air Force, but we cannot ignore the need to meticulously assess the face of the future, especially with regard to air combat platforms, which are so expensive, critical and [subject to] rapidly changing technologies,” subcommittee authors wrote.

Lawmakers said they intended to exercise their oversight role through a series of hearings on air-power alternatives aimed at influencing the IDF’s next five-year plan following the current plan, “Gideon,” which ends in 2020.

“The Committee will assess in depth ... the issue of Israeli rocket capabilities, and the potential for realistic and significant alternatives to the aerial option. The committee reasons that despite the proven capability of the Israel Air Force, it must seriously assess alternatives given future challenges and threats to the Air Force‘s ability to operate in any theater and under any conditions.”
https://www.defensenews.com/global/mideast-africa/2017/09/25/israeli-lawmakers-validate-acquisition-of-50-f-35s-but-pledge-stringent-review-before-follow-on-buys/

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4202 on: October 06, 2017, 14:15:46 »
Eielson AFB in interior near Fairbanks:

Quote
F-35A fighter jet coming to Alaskan Air Force base for testing

A fighter jet will be at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, for testing this month.

The F-35A Lighting II will be the first of its kind to visit Eielson, the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported. It’s a multipurpose fighter plane designed to replace older fighters, including the U.S. Air Force’s F-16 Fighting Falcons, the A-10 Warthog, the Navy’s aircraft carrier-based F-18 Hornet and the Marine Corps’ AV-8B Harrier II.

The F-35 is the most expensive weapons program in U.S. history. Each one costs about $95 million. The U.S. plans to buy more than 2,400 of them and sell hundreds to allies.

Cmdr. David Mineau of the 354th Fighter Wing plans to talk with community leaders about the F-35A’s mission in Alaska in mid-October.

The planes will not be used by the two squadrons set to come to Eielson in 2020. Construction began during the summer to prepare for the arrival of the two squadrons, along with about 3,000 airmen and their families, civilian employees and contractors...
https://www.defensenews.com/training-sim/2017/10/06/f-35a-fighter-jet-coming-to-alaskan-air-force-base-for-testing/

Edit 1600: USAF has no current plans to use F-35A for NORAD role.

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« Last Edit: October 06, 2017, 16:03:24 by MarkOttawa »
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4203 on: October 07, 2017, 11:14:31 »
Continuing confusion in Belgian new fighter competition (and what might France propose to Canada/Bombardier?):

Quote
Belgium eyes British, U.S. jets; French offer under legal scrutiny

Belgium has received proposals from Britain and the United States to replace its ageing fleet of fighter jets, while a French proposal that was not part of the tender process will be looked at separately, Belgium’s defense minister said.

Belgium invited government-led proposals in March for the replacement of its fleet of Lockheed Martin F-16 planes with 34 new fighters, in a deal that could be worth more than 3.5 billion euros ($4.2 billion).

Last month, France proposed a wide-ranging military deal with Belgium instead of responding to the tender. The deal goes beyond the terms of the tender whilst including the sale of Rafale fighter jets.

While the French offer would be discussed by the government, it could open Belgium to criticism that it was not treating candidates equally, Vandeput said.

“To be very clear, the French offer is not part of the contest,” minister Steven Vandeput told a parliamentary committee on Wednesday.

Offers from the U.S. for Lockheed F-35 Lightning II planes and British offers for the Eurofighter Typhoon did meet the tender rules, the minister added.

A spokeswoman for the defense ministry said the French proposal was being checked by its legal services and forwarded to the government which would decide at a later stage whether or not to respond.

The Rafales are made by France’s Dassault Aviation which declined to comment on Thursday.

Boeing pulled out of the race last spring...
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-belgium-military/belgium-eyes-british-u-s-jets-french-offer-under-legal-scrutiny-idUSKBN1CA1J5

Mark
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Offline Colin P

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4204 on: October 18, 2017, 14:44:11 »
Interesting, if a S-200 was able to get a hit on the F35, that won't bode well for the F-35 rep. Even if it did not and it was a bird, chances are this story will dog them. If it was a missile hit, they won't be able to talk about it. A missile hit could be that the IDF was flying it like a previous generation aircraft and assumed it was not visible when it was. Also if there was a hit, you can bet that a lot of people will be scratching their heads on how and why. Meanwhile expect Russia to push the story to help sales of it's AD systems.

From a Canadian perspective, it might give the Libs a reason to delay any decision on the aircraft.

https://www.globalresearch.ca/israel-is-hiding-the-fact-that-its-state-of-the-art-f-35-warplane-was-hit-by-syrian-s-200-missile-reports/5613807

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4205 on: October 18, 2017, 17:31:28 »
The source is not credible.

Offline MCG

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4206 on: October 18, 2017, 18:35:43 »
It is also claiming a direct hit yet the plane made it home and the pilot survived.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4207 on: October 18, 2017, 19:15:38 »
An SA-5?  Sure...

Offline SeaKingTacco

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4208 on: October 18, 2017, 19:26:08 »
Knowing even what little I know about both SA5s and F35s, there is no chance this story is even remotely true.

F35s are not invisible or magic, but I seriously doubt the Syrians tracked an F35, much less got a hit. Especially a direct hit.

Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4209 on: October 18, 2017, 19:39:31 »
An SA-5?  Sure...

The SA-5 was introduced into Soviet service in 1966. Its been upgraded since then, but still its pretty well a museum piece. Plus, the Syrian SA-5 sites were located near Homs*, which is north of Lebanon and depending where the IAF aircraft were operating they might have been out of range of the SA-5.

Based on old maps from Google Earth. Possible they could have been moved, especially due to ongoing insurgency.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2017, 19:42:08 by Retired AF Guy »
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4210 on: October 19, 2017, 08:59:21 »
On F-16.net they are saying it was a bird strike

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4211 on: October 19, 2017, 16:20:42 »
Big hmmm--UK MPs seem rather more on the ball than ours:

Quote
Yes, British F-35 engines must be sent to Turkey for overhaul
Also, the US negotiates fighter jet purchase contracts on our behalf

Britain’s F-35B fighter jets currently cost around $123m each – and British officials are quite content that the only engine overhaul facility for the stealth aircraft’s engines is located in Turkey.

The House of Commons’ Defence Committee questioned British ministers, civil servants and senior officers on the F-35 purchase programme, revealing that Britain is still publicly committed to buying 138 F-35Bs.

Speculation had mounted that Britain may not buy its full complement of the aircraft thanks to well-publicised holes in the defence budget, which – in a break with tradition – caused Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon to publicly call for a bigger defence budget.

The committee, consisting of mostly Conservative MPs along with a smattering of Labour MPs and sole representatives from each of Scotland’s SNP and Northern Ireland’s DUP, initially questioned executives from Lockheed Martin about the F-35. This, rather predictably, resulted in the execs insisting everything was fine with the F-35 – including questions over the aircraft’s handling in the transonic region, where it goes from sub-sonic flight to supersonic flight.

“All F-35 variants display objectionable or unacceptable flying qualities at transonic speeds, where aerodynamic forces on the aircraft are rapidly changing,” we reported the Straus Military Reform Project as saying in a report earlier this year.

Peter Ruddock, Lockheed’s UK chief exec, said in reply to the commitee's questions: “The problem here is the different parts of the aircraft become supersonic at different times and there's always a controllability issue with that. I've spoken to some of the test pilots involved … the quality of the handling is more than satisfactory or better throughout the flight regime.”..

The only other major item from the committee hearing, other than Labour MP Ruth Smeeth having a pop at DDC – the Ministry of Defence’s Directorate of Defence Communication, its spin doctor battalion – was SNP MP Martin Docherty-Hughes questioning Baldwin on engine overhauls. As El Reg reported last year, the Pratt and Whitney F135 engines of Britain’s frontline carrier fighter jets can only be overhauled in Turkey, by decree of the American Joint Project Office managing the F-35 project.

“In terms of the engine programme,” said Baldwin in response to Docherty-Hughes’ questions, “that will happen again within Turkey. I believe the warehousing [of other aircraft components] is happening in the Netherlands, and there’s a series of ongoing competitions. Turkey is a NATO country.”..
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/10/19/f35_fighter_engines_turkey_overhaul/

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