Author Topic: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces  (Read 140053 times)

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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #25 on: July 14, 2005, 10:04:02 »
SEAL memorial service at the Punch Bowl in Hawaii.

http://froggyruminations.blogspot.com/

Nightstalker memorial service.

July 18, 2005

Comrades recall special memories of fallen troops

By Russ Bynum
Associated Press writer


SAVANNAH, Ga. â ” Even some of the toughest soldiers cried July 7 as they remembed the elite helicopter crew of eight soldiers killed when their MH-47 Chinook was shot down in the deadliest single attack on U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

â Å“A loss of one is felt by everybody, but a loss of eight is a shockwave,â ? said Maj. Chad Chasteen, a company commander in the slain soldiers' unit, the 3rd Battalion, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment.

More than 800 people attended the service at Hunter Army Airfield in Savannah.

The Chinook crashed June 28 after being hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, killing all on board as well as eight Navy SEALs.

A slide projector flashed photos on a screen of the crew â ” Staff Sgt. Shamus O. Goare, Chief Warrant Officer Corey J. Goodnature, Sgt. Kip A. Jacoby, Sgt. 1st Class Marcus V. Muralles, Maj. Stephen C. Reich, Sgt. 1st Class Michael L. Russell, Chief Warrant Officer Chris J. Scherkenbach and Master Sgt. James W. Ponder III.

In eulogies the soldiers were described as heroes who routinely took on missions others would deem too dangerous.

â Å“I can still see Mike hanging off the ramp, one wheel on the side of a mountain, amazingly able to get his teams into their landing zones,â ? former unit member Jason Sims said of Russell, 31, of Stafford, Va.

A fellow soldier remembered Reich, 34, of Washington Depot, Conn., for putting his career on the line for altering a mission plan to rescue a group of soldiers.

Scherkenbach, 40, would take his orange University of Florida ballcap on deployments for luck. Goodnature, 35, of Clarks Grove, Minn., loved hunting deer and the quiet of the woods.

Muralles, 33, of Shelbyville, Ind., was a medic a quirky sense of humor. Goare, 29, of Danville, Ohio, comforted newcomers with stories of the tongue-lashings he'd endured from commanders. Jacoby, 21, of Pompano Beach, Fla., had arms decorated with tattoos and was at ease with strangers.

Ponder, 36, of Franklin, Tenn., had been temporarily assigned to the Savannah unit from Fort Campbell, Ky., which held a memorial service for him July 6. About 500 special operations soldiers attended that service. Ponder was remembered by members of his unit as a no-nonsense soldier and a Christian who was devoted to his country.

Formed in 1981, 160th has has had 21 soldiers killed in action since 2002.

â Å“I know you punched your ticket the way you wanted it, flying in the clouds,â ? Sgt. Jason Bailey said, sobbing during his eulogy to Goare. â Å“Grab Muralles by the shoulders and tell him it's OK to sit on the gun cans. Because guns aren't needed where you're going.â ?
« Last Edit: July 14, 2005, 16:57:43 by tomahawk6 »

Offline Frankie

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2005, 19:53:58 »
found on another forum site.... so touched i had to share....


http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=55437


Sorry mods... delete if you must

Offline Spr.Earl

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2005, 05:50:30 »
found on another forum site.... so touched i had to share....


http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=55437


Sorry mods... delete if you must
Frankie your post will not be removed mark words as one of many Mod's. on our site.
I must say I did like the comment about the long winded Sky Pilot ;)
But a impressive display of small town Texas for the loss of one of their Son's. :cdn: :salute:

THE PRECEDING POST AND OTHERS MADE BY MYSELF ARE MY PERSONAL VIEWS, NOT FOR REPRODUCTION, NOT FOR CUT AND PASTE OF ANY PORTION THEREOF, NO QUOTES ARE PERMITTED ELSEWHERE,ANYWHERE OTHER THAN EXCLUSIVELY IN THIS WEB FORUM.




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Be Safe

Offline Robert S

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #28 on: July 29, 2005, 22:11:16 »
That was incredible. I love Texas.
Pure Sentinel. Pure Power.
God bless Canada.

Offline Frankie

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #29 on: July 29, 2005, 22:21:18 »

Got blurry vision on that one, even the second time as i was explaining it to my wife

Thanks Spr....  :salute:

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2005, 16:21:15 »
Sergeant Chris Hickey of 1st Battalion the Coldstream Guards killed in Iraq
Published Thursday 20th October 2005


Sergeant Chris Hickey of the 1st Battalion the Coldstream Guards [Picture: Army]It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has confirmed the death of Sergeant Chris Hickey of the 1st Battalion the Coldstream Guards.  Sergeant Hickey died as a result of injuries sustained from a roadside bomb at approximately 2320 hrs local time in Basra, Iraq, on Tuesday 18 October 2005.

The Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards Battle Group, Lieutenant Colonel Nick Henderson, has made the following statement:

"I regret to announce that late last night a British Army Patrol was attacked using an Improvised Explosive Device in Basra City, Southern Iraq.  At the time of the attack the Patrol Commander, Sergeant Chris Hickey, had moved forward on foot to reconnoiter a route for the patrol and as such he was severely injured in the blast.  He was given first aid at the scene before being evacuated by ambulance and helicopter to the British Military Hospital in Shaiba, where, despite the best efforts of all those involved in treating him, he was declared dead on arrival.

"Chris joined the Coldstream Guards in 1993 where he immediately made his mark as a capable and reliable individual.  He was to maintain this impression throughout his service in the Regiment as he promoted through the ranks, always displaying great commitment and efficiency in everything he did.  In so doing he set a fine example to those of all ranks who served with him; it is significant that at the time of his death he was, as ever, leading his men from the front.  A bright future in the Army beckoned and he would undoubtedly have gone far in the profession that he had chosen and that he loved.  He was the epitome of a professional soldier. 

"Chris was more than just this.  He was a fun-loving and warm hearted character who always displayed an irrepressible cheerfulness; however bad things were Chris could always raise a smile.  He had a certain spark that brought out the best in people and this, coupled with his infectious sense of humour, could be relied on to lighten any situation.  To him things were always good, or, as he would put it, 'Canny'. 

"We are also keenly aware that Chris was not just a comrade and friend to those of us who were fortunate enough to serve alongside him; he was also a loving husband and son.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to his wife, parents, family and friends at this tragic time."

John Reid, Secretary of State for Defence, said:

"The death of this British soldier in Iraq last night deeply saddens me.  All our thoughts and sympathies are with the family at this very difficult time."

We would ask that the media respect the privacy of his family at this difficult time

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #31 on: October 31, 2005, 11:14:52 »
Lance Corporal Steven Sherwood killed in Afghanistan
Published Monday 31st October 2005


Lance Corporal Steven Sherwood, of the 1st Battalion, The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Light Infantry.It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has confirmed the death of Lance Corporal Steven Sherwood, of the 1st Battalion, The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Light Infantry.  Lance Corporal Sherwood was killed on 29 October 2005, in a shooting incident in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan.  Five others were injured.

Lance Corporal Sherwood, was 23, and single.  He was from Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire.

The 1st Battalion's Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Nick Welch, made the following statement:

"Lance Corporal Steven Gregory Sherwood joined his local regiment, the Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Light Infantry in June 1999.  He joined the 1st Battalion in Colchester and shortly after deployed on a two year operational tour to Northern Ireland.  Since then he has served in Belize, Jamaica, Norway, Kosovo and Afghanistan.

"Steven Sherwood, known to his mates as Shirley, was a thoroughly professional and dedicated soldier who was promoted to Lance Corporal earlier this year.  A highly capable field soldier at the top of his profession, he was a key member of his Battalion's close reconnaissance platoon.  In Afghanistan he worked as a key member of a tight-knit, experienced and highly professional military observation team.  He thrived on the challenges provided by his team's tasks.  He traveled with his team to parts of Afghanistan that had not previously been patrolled by the multi-national International Security Assistance Force.
 
"Only the night before he was killed, Lance Corporal Sherwood and his team had assisted at the scene of a traffic accident involving an Afghan National Army patrol and civilian vehicle, where he provided immediate first aid and coordinated the extraction of the injured.

"He epitomised all that is excellent about his Regiment.  A keen sportsman, his particular talents lay in skiing and football.  Lance Corporal Sherwood was renowned for his character and could always be relied on to lighten a situation with his keen sense of humour.  He could usually be traced to the scene of an amusing incident, but rarely implicated.  He will be remembered by all as a good mate who would never leave a friend and could be counted on to cover his buddies' backs, in the finest traditions of his Regiment.  He will be sorely missed by so many of the Regiment who regarded him as a close friend."

Commenting on the incident, Secretary of State for Defence John Reid said:

"My thoughts and sympathies are with the family and friends of the soldier tragically killed in Mazar-e-Sharif".

We would ask that the media respect the privacy of his family at this difficult time.

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2005, 18:16:58 »
Death of Corporal Ian Humphrey in Gibraltar
Published Thursday 10th November 2005


It is with great sadness that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death of RAF Corporal Ian Humphrey, who was found dead in his accommodation whilst serving in Gibraltar.

The cause of death has not yet been confirmed.  Cpl Humphrey's next of kin have been informed and have asked that the media respect their privacy at this difficult time.

Squadron Leader Peter Revell, Second in Command of RAF Gibraltar, made the following statement:

"Corporal Ian Richard Humphrey joined the Royal Air Force as an Apprentice Aircraft Engineering Technician Airframes and Propulsion in March 1990.  Following training he was promoted to the rank of Junior Technician in 1993 and then to Corporal in 1994.  He served at Royal Air Force stations St Mawgan and Wittering in the UK prior to joining Aircraft Weapons Engineering Section at Royal Air Force Gibraltar in June 2003. 

"Cpl Humphrey was a highly proficient airman, who meticulously carried out the duties associated with the ground handling and first line engineering support of visiting and detached aircraft.  He was appreciated by visiting air and ground crews for the professionalism and courtesy given without reservation, often out of normal working hours.  He was totally dedicated to the Service and was awarded the Golden Jubilee Medal in February 2002. 

"Cpl Humphrey was also a keen sportsman, crewing as a member of the Tri-Service Gibraltar Gun Crew team, competing in the UK recently and playing as part of the Royal Air Force Gibraltar football team.  The news of the death of Corporal Humphrey shocked the entire Service community of Gibraltar. 

"Ever popular for his outgoing personality and friendly nature, he will be sorely missed by the many friends and colleagues he leaves behind."

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #33 on: November 21, 2005, 16:08:16 »
Sergeant John Jones killed in Basra
Published Monday 21st November 2005


Sgt John 'Jonah' Jones of 1st Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers   
It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has confirmed the death of Sergeant John Jones in Basra on 20 November 2005. Sergeant Jones, from 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers as a result of injuries sustained from a roadside bomb at approximately 1230 hrs local time in Basra, Iraq.   He was on a routine patrol as the commander when the incident occurred.

Sergeant John 'Jonah' Jones was born on 21st April 1974 in Birmingham.   He lived in Castle Bromwich, Birmingham and attended the Park Fields School before joining the British Army at the age of 16.

Sergeant Jones joined the British Army in June 1990 and completed his basic training at the Junior Leaders' Regiment, Shorncliffe.   Completing his training in June 1991, he joined A Company 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers in Hemer, Germany.   His talent for boxing was soon noted and within a year Sergeant Jones had represented the 3rd Battalion in a Novice competition.   Sergeant Jones moved to the 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers in Warminster 1993 when the 3rd Battalion merged with the 1st Battalion as part of 'Options for Change'.   As a Fusilier in Y Company of the 1st Battalion he saw active service in Bosnia, Northern Ireland and Kosovo.   In 1998 he was posted to Army Training Regiment Bassingbourne as an instructor where he honed both his fishing and instructional skills.   He returned to the 1st Battalion in 2000.

Sergeant Jones served with the 1st Battalion in both the War Fighting and Peace Support phases of Operation TELIC 1 as part of the First Fusiliers Reconnaissance Group in early 2003.   He was initially employed as a Recce CVR(T) Car Commander.   He was promoted to Sergeant in 2003, becoming a Platoon Sergeant in Z Company and he led his Platoon in winning the Battalion's Military Skills Competition in March 2004.   He was a dedicated and consummate professional, who hated tardiness, was physically fit and had a keen eye for detail.   Always willing to lead by example, he was never afraid to get his hands dirty and set high standards for himself and those whom he commanded, but he was always fair, just and compassionate.

Sgt Jones was a keen sportsman.   He boxed for both his Company and the Battalions he served, was a keen footballer and represented the Army at fishing.   He was popular with all ranks from across the Battalion.   He possessed a dry, but razor sharp sense of humour which could lighten any situation.   A committed Aston Villa fan, he made every effort to never miss a televised match and regularly invited his platoon to his house to join him.

He was a loyal husband to Nickie and a devoted father to his son Jack, 5.   He was a highly professional soldier with energy, charisma and compassion.   He was an immensely well liked and respected member of the First Fusiliers and he will be sorely missed by all those that had the privilege of serving with him.

His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Simon Marr MBE, said:

"It is with deep regret that I must announce that, yesterday afternoon at 1230 hours local, a British Army patrol from the First Fusiliers was attacked by a roadside bomb in Basrah City, Southern Iraq.   The explosion hit the leading vehicle of a two vehicle landrover patrol as it was returning to its base after completing a routine patrolling task.   Sergeant John Jones, the patrol commander, received a fatal wound and despite the best possible efforts of the medical staff at the scene he could not be saved.  

"Sergeant John Jones' tragic and untimely death has come as an immense blow and shock to his immediate family, his friends and all members of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.   'Jonah' Jones was a much loved and highly popular member of our Battalion, the First Fusiliers.   Brimming with energy, a love of soldiering and an endearing sense of humour and compassion for his men, he will be sorely missed.   Whether it was on operations or during training with the soldiers he led so ably, or on the sports field or in the boxing ring, he showed remarkable qualities of professionalism, grit and absolute determination.   Having already completed a tour of Iraq in March 2003, he looked forward with optimism and determination to playing his part in bringing a semblance of stability and normality to Iraq.   In the short period of this tour, he and his patrol had already established an excellent rapport with the local population and he was enjoying the challenges of his role.

"Sergeant Jones was an outstanding soldier, a wonderful husband and a loving father, who always found time to speak to and encourage those around him.   He had a smile for everyone.   We are left remembering his drive, his courage, his humour and his typically understated contribution to the Battalion.   We will never forget him.   Our thoughts and prayers are now with his wife, Nickie, and his young son, Jack.   I would ask the media to respect the family's privacy at this very difficult time."  

Sergeant Jones' wife, Nickie, paid the following tribute to her husband:

"Jonah was a real all round sportsman.   He boxed, played football and was passionate about Aston Villa.     He loved being a soldier and was very proud of his Regiment.   But most of all he was a fantastic Dad and loving Husband.   I would ask the media to respect the privacy of my family at this time as we try to come to terms with our terrible loss."

The Secretary of State for Defence, John Reid, said:

"I was very saddened to hear yesterday morning that a British soldier had died whilst performing his duty in Iraq.

"As always, my thoughts and prayers are with his family, and those of his fellow soldiers injured in this barbaric act of terrorism."


Sgt John 'Jonah' Jones of 1st Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #34 on: December 09, 2005, 17:29:17 »
Death of RAF Falcon Sergeant Marc Little
Published Friday 9th December 2005


Sergeant Marc Little It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has confirmed the death of Royal Air Force parachutist Sergeant Marc Little on Wednesday 7 December 2005 during a parachute training exercise in the United States.

Marc Little was born in 1973 in Bishop Auckland, County Durham where his parents still live.  Marc joined the Royal Air Force in 1993 as a Physical Training Instructor and served at Halton, Chicksands and in the Falkland Islands before arriving at the Parachute Training School, RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire in 2000.  He married in 2003 and settled in the local area.   

Marc was entering his second year as a Royal Air Force Falcon display parachutist. He was selected for this duty on the basis of his outstanding talent and potential as a future freefall instructor.  Marc also consistently displayed those other essential personal qualities required to be member of a talented team engaged in high risk activity; courage, teamwork, professionalism and discipline. 

The  RAF Falcons display programme runs throughout the summer,in the UK and overseas. An extremely fit and talented sportsman, Marc also regularly represented the Royal Air Force at football.

Gp Capt Elliott, Station Commander RAF Brize Norton, said:

"Marc was immensely popular; a loyal friend with a positive outlook on life.  He was a highly respected member of the Falcons Display team and an outstanding ambassador for the Royal Air Force. 

"The Parachute Training School is an important element in the development and continuation of airborne capability and, as with all specialist capabilities, regular training is essential. This tragic accident has deeply shocked us. We will all miss Marc greatly and our thoughts and condolences go out to his wife and family."



Sergeant Marc Little

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #35 on: December 12, 2005, 14:54:04 »
One o'clock gunner dies



Tam mans the The 105 millimetre light gun at Edinburgh Castle.It is with great regret that we hear of the death of Staff Sergeant Thomas McKay MBE, or as he was known to hundreds of thousands of Scots and tourists, Tam the Gun, of cancer at the age of 60.

Tam had been Edinburgh's District Gunner, firing the capital's infamous One O'Clock Gun, since July 1979, until he became ill earlier this year.
As well as his firing duties, Tam was an active member of the Territorial Army for most of his life, latterly working as an Army chef at 243 Provost Company (Volunteers) of the Royal Military Police in Livingston until he retired five years ago.

Tam was one of the most famous faces in Edinburgh and was loved by visitors to the castle for his approachable character and his anecdotes of working there. These anecdotes eventually became a book which Tam wrote in aid of the Army Benevolent Fund, called 'What time does the One O'Clock Gun fire?' which saw its way to all corners of the world as a souvenir. A staunch supporter of the Army Benevolent Fund, Tam did many talks to various organisations around the country about his work as District Gunner in aid of this charity.

Tam also had the honour of having several things named after him; 'Tam's Dram', a whisky which is sold in the castle, and GNER are due to name a train after him next month. He was also responsible for the creation of the One O'Clock Gun Exhibition in Edinburgh Castle, for which he received Lottery funding to set up.

Tam's greatest honour came when he was awarded the MBE by her Majesty The Queen in 1999, for his services to the Territorial Army.

Not content with his day job, Tam also worked at the Edinburgh Military Tattoo each August, including, despite his illness, this year's show. It was while doing his job looking after the overseas contingents at the Tattoo that he became friendly with the Norwegian Army's Kings Guard, who have appeared at the show on numerous occasions and who have maintained strong links with Tam and Edinburgh Castle. Tam and his wife Joyce were married last year in the city of Bergen in Norway, at the invitation of his Norwegian friends whom met through this alliance.
Tam also could be seen each New Year firing the Gun on the BBC's Hogmanay Show, and he brought the millennium in with a bang for millions of viewers. No stranger to the media, he was frequently the subject of news reports and documentaries on television all over the world.

Major Andy Jackson, the Deputy Chief of Staff at the castle's 52 Infantry Brigade said, "Tam will be sadly missed by all members of the military community and the staff of Historic Scotland in Edinburgh Castle. He was a true character and he and his gun will remain a cherished of many tourist's trips to Edinburgh. Our thoughts are with Joyce and his son and two daughters."



Offline Rfn

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2006, 15:25:53 »
CWO Hugh Thompson Jnr

CWO Thompson helped stop the My Lai massacre. He was vilified by some veterans congress and was not  decorated for his brave act for 30 years.

A brave and moral man. RIP :salute:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4589486.stm

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #37 on: January 11, 2006, 23:52:06 »
Hugh Thompson
April 15, 1943 - January 6, 2006
Helicopter pilot who intervened to save lives during the US Army massacre of Vietnamese civilians at My Lai
 
 
 
 
 
::nobreak::HUGH C. THOMPSON JR, was a helicopter pilot who tried to halt the infamous My Lai massacre by American troops, during the Vietnam War. He valiantly rescued 15 defenceless civilians while training his machine guns on US infantrymen commanded by the infamous Lieutenant William Calley, threatening to “blow them away” if they did not stop the slaughter.

March 16, 1968, was one of the darkest days in US military history. Thompson believed Calley’s men behaved like Nazis: “We were supposed to be the guys in the white hats — they were the enemy that day, I guess.” When evidence of the 504 civilian deaths in the atrocity was finally made public in late 1969, Thompson was immediately castigated by pro-Vietnam War politicians conducting an inquiry for the House of Representatives Armed Services Committee.

Concerned to protect the image of the US Army, the chairman, L. Mendal Rivers, and one of his fellow Southern Democrats claimed that the real guilty party at My Lai was the rogue helicopter pilot who they argued had committed a crime by threatening to shoot American troops.

Only 30 years later was Thompson belatedly recognised as a genuine American hero by the Pentagon. In March 1998, he received the Soldier’s Medal, the US Army’s highest award for bravery in peacetime. It was presented by a two-star general at a special ceremony at the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, complete with band, flags flying, much razzmatazz and full media coverage.

A nine-year letter-writing campaign to get him the award had won support from President George Bush Sr, General Colin Powell and several retired general staff officers and senators. The Clinton White House had held up presenting the award for 18 months. Cynics believed that the sitting President did not want to draw attention to his having avoided going to Vietnam while Thompson had nobly served his country.

Hugh Clowers Thompson Jr was born in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1943, and moved to nearby Stone Mountain — population 2,000 — when he was 3. His father, Hugh C. Thompson Sr, served with both the US Army and Navy in the Second World War and then spent 30 years with the US Navy Reserve. Thompson’s paternal grandfather was a full-blooded Cherokee, forced off tribal land in North Carolina in the 1850s and resettled on a farm in Georgia.

Both his parents were Episcopalians, and strict churchgoers. Thompson’s mother, Wessie, had a simple creed with her two sons, Hugh and his brother Tommie, who was five years his senior: “Do your chores. Don’t lie. And don’t run if you’re about to get a whipping.” Hugh Sr was a local Scoutmaster and his boys had Scout laws drummed into them. They were taught to be polite during meals, to say “Yes, sir” and “Yes, ma’am ” when talking to adults, and always to stand up for the underdog. In one early encounter Hugh Jr got into a scrap with a group of boys at school making fun of a physically handicapped child.

Before his teens he was earning money ploughing local cornfields, and at 15 had a part-time job with a local undertaker. A few weeks after his 18th birthday, before he graduated from the local Stone Mountain High School, he married a local girl secretly. The marriage was annulled a few months later just as Thompson joined the US Navy and spent three years with a Seabees construction unit.

After a brief return to civilian life in 1964, during which he became a licensed funeral director, Thompson re-enlisted — this time in the US Army, which was becoming heavily engaged in the Vietnam War. There had been a massive build-up of army helicopters in Vietnam, which meant a dramatic increase in pilot recruitment. Thompson enlisted and trained at Fort Walters, Texas, and Fort Rucker, Alabama.

By the time he arrived in Vietnam in late December 1967, he was a 25-year-old chief warrant officer, a reconnaissance pilot with the 123rd Aviation Battalion. It was dangerous work, flying low over enemy territory in advance of ground operations, spotting enemy defensive positions and calling in gunships to engage.

On March 16, 1968, Thompson was flying his small H23 scout helicopter, with its three-man crew, over a part of Quang Ngai province thought to be infested with Vietcong troops. He was in support of a search-and-destroy assault on several villages, which faulty intelligence had indicated were heavily defended. The US 1/20th Infantry Battalion attack was led by Charlie Company — commanded by Captain Ernest Medina. He sent in the 1st platoon led by Calley — with orders to clear out My Lai and several neighbouring hamlets.

Charlie Company was bent on revenge. Days earlier several of its members, including a popular sergeant, had been killed by Vietcong mines and booby traps. Without a shot being fired against them Calley’s men began slaughtering anyone they could find — old men, women and children. Groups of villagers, 20 and 30 at a time, were lined up and mown down. In the four-hour assault, men of the company’s other two platoons joined in. Many women and girls were raped and then murdered.

Thompson early on spotted a young woman injured in a field. He dropped a smoke canister to indicate that she needed medical help. He later told a court martial how Captain Medina went over and shot her with his rifle. Medina claimed that he thought she had a grenade. Later Thompson halted at a drainage ditch on the western side of My Lai — filled with 170 bodies of massacred villagers. One of Thompson’s crew rescued a child still alive and flew it to hospital at Quang Ngai. In another incident Thompson saw a group of 15 civilians hiding in a bunker.

Calley’s men were about to attack them when Thompson landed his helicopter and challenged the 1st platoon commander, asking for help to get the women and children out. “The only way you’ll get them out is with a hand grenade,” replied Calley. Thompson returned to his helicopter and told his gunners to open fire on Calley’s men if they advanced any closer. He then called down gunships to rescue the civilians, who were flown out of the village to safety.

On returning to Chu Lai military base Thompson reported everything to his commanding officer. The allegations were passed on to brigade and divisional commanders but a local inquiry whitewashed Thompson’s complaints, claiming that the civilians deaths had been caused by artillery fire.

An elaborate cover-up ensued which involved falsifying brigade documents and included Thompson being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for saving the lives of Vietnamese civilians “in the face of hostile enemy fire”. The citation omitted to mention that the hostile fire was coming from his own side. He threw the medal away, believing that his commanders wanted to buy his silence.

A year later the Pentagon learnt the truth and a high- level inquiry was conducted by Lieutenantt-General William R. Peers. So impressed was Peers with Thompson’s courage he chose him as his personal pilot when he went on a 12-day fact-finding trip around Vietnam during the course of his investigation.

Thompson later appeared as a witness at the courts martial of several men involved in the massacre or cover-up. The only person convicted was Calley, who served a few months in jail before having his life sentence reduced and being given parole.

During his time in Vietnam, Thompson was shot down five times — finally breaking his spine. He received a commission, but back in America some of his uninformed colleagues regarded him as a turncoat. The full extent of the carnage at My Lai had been deliberately hidden from the American public. Returning to Fort Rucker he went to the officers’ mess for a drink. All 12 men there got up and walked out. One anonymous postcard he received asked: “What do you think war is? ” Calley meanwhile — facing a trial — was being regarded as a hero. Even Jimmy Carter, Governor of Georgia, held a “Rally for Cally”.

The My Lai experience and its aftermath affected Thompson badly. He grappled with alcohol and had several failed marriages. After service in South Korea, Thompson returned to the US, dropping the name Hugh and calling himself by his family name Buck, trying to distance himself from past events. He left the army briefly and then re-enlisted, flying with medical evacuation units, and instructing trainee pilots.

He retired from the army in November 1983, and worked as a helicopter pilot for oil companies off the Louisiana coast.

In 1989 he appeared in a Yorkshire Television documentary, Four Hours in My Lai, which won a Bafta and an Emmy. After it was shown in America, David Egan, a former soldier and professor of architecture at the University of South Carolina, began a campaign to have Thompson’s bravery recognised and his wartime DFC replaced by something more fitting.

The US Army agreed finally after seven years, but wanted the Soldier’s Medal presented quietly, preferring to keep what happened at My Lai in the background. Thompson resisted. He wanted a ceremony at the Vietnam Memorial and the bravery of his fellow helicopter crew members to be recognised as well. They also received the Soldier’s Medal, one of them posthumously.

Mike Wallace, of the CBS 60 Minutes programme, took Thompson and his surviving crew member, Larry Colburn, back to My Lai, where they were introduced to three women who survived the massacre. On a second visit three years later he met an electrician from Ho Chi Minh City called Do Hoa, aged 42, who aged 9 was one of the children Thompson rescued from the bunker.

Thompson worked for the Louisiana Department of Veteran Affairs for six years, giving lectures to students and schoolchildren. He delivered addresses to the military academies of the army, navy and air force and regularly attended the West Point Military Academy, speaking about ethics.

He died in Alexandria, Louisiana, after a short illness.

After his annulled marriage in 1961, his three subsequent marriages were dissolved.

He is survived by three sons, and by his long-time partner, Mona Gossen.




Hugh Clowers Thompson Jr was born on April 15, 1943. He died on January 6, 2006, aged 62.
 
 
 

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #38 on: January 11, 2006, 23:58:27 »
Canadian-born soldier killed in Iraq
Wednesday, January 11, 2006
Posted at 8:16 PM EST
Canadian Press

Montreal — A Canadian-born U.S. soldier was among the 12 passengers killed when their Black Hawk helicopter crashed in northern Iraq over the weekend.
The CBC's Fench-language service reports that David DeMoores, 36, left Canada several years ago to live with his girlfriend in the United States.

The couple later married and had three children.
Mr. DeMoores, a native of Aylmer, Que., gave up his Canadian citizenship when he decided to join the American army in order to support his growing family, Radio-Canada reported Wednesday.
“It wouldn't be my first choice, but it was his,” said Mr. DeMoores's mother, Danielle DeMoores-Lanthier, of her son's career choice.

“We supported him and encouraged him and we're proud of him.”
Mr. DeMoores visited his mother and adoptive father in Gatineau, Que., last year, just before leaving for Iraq.

U.S. officials have not yet said what caused the crash, which occurred east of the insurgent stronghold of Tal Afar, near the Syrian border.
More than 2,200 members of the U.S. military have died in Iraq since the beginning of the war in 2003, according to an Associated Press count.

© Copyright 2006 Bell Globemedia Publishing Inc. All Rights Reserved.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2006, 20:20:46 by Bruce Monkhouse »

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #39 on: January 31, 2006, 02:01:50 »
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/4458628.stm

Tributes to Iraq blast sergeant 
 
John "Jonah" Jones served in Bosnia, Northern Ireland and Kosovo
The widow of a British soldier killed by a roadside bomb in Iraq on Sunday has paid tribute to a loving husband and "fantastic dad".
Sergeant John Jones, 31, died and four others were injured, one seriously, in the attack in Basra. They are being treated at the Shaiba field hospital.

Sgt "Jonah" Jones, a Birmingham father of one, served with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

His wife Nickie said family members were mourning their "terrible loss".

The death of Sgt Jones, from Castle Bromwich, brings to 98 the number of British military fatalities since the invasion in March 2003.

  He loved being a soldier and was very proud of his regiment

Nickie Jones

Mrs Jones described her husband as an "all round sportsman" who boxed, played football and was "passionate about Aston Villa".

"He loved being a soldier and was very proud of his regiment," she said.

Sgt Jones was "a fantastic dad" to their five-year-old son Jack, she added.

'Much loved'

Sgt Jones' commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Simon Marr, said he would be remembered as an "outstanding" soldier.

"Jonah Jones was a much loved and highly popular member of our Battalion, the First Fusiliers," he said.

  Brimming with energy, a love of soldiering and an endearing sense of humour and compassion for his men, he will be sorely missed

Sgt Jones' commanding officer Lieutenant Colonel Simon Marr 
Lt Col Marr described Sgt Jones as "brimming with energy, a love of soldiering and an endearing sense of humour and compassion for his men" and a man who would be "sorely missed".

Defence Secretary John Reid has also paid tribute to Sgt Jones.

"I was very saddened to hear that a British soldier had died whilst performing his duty in Iraq," he said.

"As always, my thoughts and prayers are with his family, and those of his fellow soldiers injured in this barbaric act of terrorism."

Sgt Jones joined the Army at 16 and had served in Bosnia, Northern Ireland and Kosovo.

New devices

Sunday's attack happened while the soldiers were on a routine patrol at about 1230 local time in the north of Basra.

British forces in Iraq spokesman Major Steve Melbourne said the attack had been carried out by terrorists and not local insurgents.

"These are very small groups that operate in the area," he added.

"They cause serious risk to both ourselves and the local population in Basra."

The BBC's Paul Wood said the device used in the attack was likely to be one of a new type of hi-tech explosive device which has been killing British soldiers since August.

They have sophisticated triggers and are capable of piercing through armour, which mean patrols in southern Iraq are "far more risky" for British soldiers.

The UK government claims the technology used in the attacks is coming over the Iranian border, a charge which Tehran strongly denies.

 
Photo 1) John "Jonah" Jones served in Bosnia, Northern Ireland and Kosovo

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #40 on: January 31, 2006, 11:53:04 »
http://news.mod.uk/news/press/news_headline_story2.asp?newsItem_id=3958

Lance Corporal Allan Douglas killed in Iraq
Published Monday 30th January 2006


Whilst on a routine patrol in Al Amarah, Lance Corporal Douglas was shot and mortally wounded.  Despite the best efforts of his comrades and the medical teams he later died of his wounds.

Allan Stewart Douglas was born on 2nd May 1983 in Aberdeen.  He grew up in Northfield, Aberdeen, and attended the Northfield Academy before joining the British Army at the age of 17.

Lance Corporal Allan Douglas joined The Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) in October 2000 and, after initial training, he joined Delta Company of the 1st Battalion The Highlanders.  In 2001 he was deployed with his company on peace-keeping duties in Kosovo over Christmas and deployed again on a second peace-keeping tour, this time in Bosnia during the summer of 2003.  In April 2004 he moved with the Battalion to Fallingbostel in Germany and completed a Physical Training Instructor's Course, which he passed with credit.

Allan deployed to Canada in June 2005 for Exercise MEDICINE MAN 2 where he showed his professionalism, being a key part of the Mortar Platoon providing timely and accurate fire support for the Battle Group throughout.

In July 2005 he was promoted to Lance Corporal and prepared for deployment to Iraq as part of the 7th Armoured Brigade.  Throughout pre-deployment training his operational experience showed through and he looked forward to the new challenges ahead.  He deployed to Al Amarah  in October with Delta Company, 1st Battalion The Highlanders as part of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards Battle Group.

Allan was known for his quick wit and was a popular member of his platoon.  He was renowned  within his company for his excellent fitness and constant sense of humour.  His strength of character can be seen by his recent ability to overcome his natural fear of heights to become a rock climber while taking part in some Adventure Training in Canada.

Lieutenant Colonel James Hopkinson, his Commanding Officer, said:

"Lance Corporal Allan Douglas was extremely well liked by all who knew him, especially his comrades in the Mortar Platoon.  He displayed all the qualities of professionalism, drive and humour that make a Scottish soldier.  He was bright in character and an intelligent man  who threw himself at his job with vigour.  His recent promotion to Lance Corporal was a surprise to him but not to us who knew him.  He was a very capable soldier and had a great deal of potential. 

"His enthusiasm and comradeship were obvious in all that he did, but especially in the gymnasium.  He was happiest there, and the job of physical training instructor for the company saw him blossom into a capable Lance Corporal.  He was most content when takinglessons and putting his fellow Highlanders through their paces.  Allan carried this enthusiasm over to his work in Iraq.

"Allan was the perfect soldier for service in Iraq.  Chosen to serve in Delta Company Headquarters because of his own self-discipline and reliability he was a natural soldier: fit, trustworthy and at ease in often difficult situations where he never seemed to get down or become tired.  He had a tremendous style, in the true tradition of the Scottish soldier, with the Iraqis whether they were policemen, civilians or children and with hiswinning smile he soon had them on his side.  Allan was a natural team player who always looked out for others, was quick with a joke, but above all else was professional and dedicated to his task.  He made a true difference in Iraq.  It is telling that since this sad incident a great many Iraqis, both civilian leaders and members of the security forces have called to pass on their condolences.  Allan made an impact in their lives that it will be hard to match.

"Lance Corporal Douglas was not only a comrade but was a friend to many.  He will be sorely  missed by those who were privileged to serve with him."

On being informed on the incident, Defence Secretary John Reid said:

"I was very saddened to hear this morning that a British soldier had died whilst performing his duty in Iraq.

"My thoughts are with his family and friends."

We would ask the media to respect privacy of Lance Corporal Douglas' family at this difficult time.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2006, 11:56:14 by big bad john »

Offline AmmoTech90

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #41 on: January 31, 2006, 15:18:33 »
http://www.news.mod.uk/news_headline_story2.asp?newsItem_id=3959

Corporal Gordon Alexander Pritchard killed in Iraq
Published Tuesday 31st January 2006

It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death of Corporal Gordon Alexander Pritchard from the Royals Scots Dragoon Guards on 31 January 2006.

Corporal Pritchard died from injuries sustained as a result of an explosion at approximately 0534GMT in Um Qasr in Basrah Province.  He had been commanding the lead Snatch Landrover in a three-vehicle convoy on a routine rations and water run.

Gordon Alexander Pritchard was 31, and was married with children.  His next of kin have been informed.  Our deepest sympathy goes to his relatives and friends at this sad time.

Three other soldiers were injured, one seriously, in the same incident and are receiving medical treatment at Shaibah medical facility.

After being told of the incident, Secretary of State for Defence John Reid said:

    "I was greatly saddened this morning to learn of the death of a British soldier in Iraq and that three others were wounded.  Coming on top of the loss yesterday of Lance Corporal Allan Douglas this is obviously a matter of great sadness not only for the families but I believe for the armed forces and the nation.

    "We have now sustained 77 deaths through hostile action in Iraq and one hundred fatalities in all.  And it's an appropriate time to reflect on the determination, courage, professionalism and sacrifice of our armed forces themselves and of the families who also sustain them there.

    "And I think it's also a time for all of us throughout the nation to consider the contribution that they and others who have risked and given their lives have made for people in Iraq and places like Afghanistan to lift the burden of tyranny from the shoulders of those people."

The media are asked to respect the privacy of the family.
Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabris, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam.

The fragrance of Afghanistan
Rewards a long day's toil
A Passage to Bangkok- Rush

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2006, 16:16:48 »
Corporal Gordon Pritchard, Royal Scots Dragoon Guards

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #43 on: February 04, 2006, 21:42:53 »
Death of Trooper Carl Smith in Iraq
3 Feb 06
It is with great sadness and regret that the Ministry of Defence must confirm the death of Trooper Carl Smith of the 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's) on 2 February 2006, as a result of a vehicle accident whilst on operations in Abu Al Khasib, south of Basra, Iraq.

 
Trooper Carl Joseph Smith, 9th/12th Lancers (Prince of Wales's).
Carl Joseph Smith was born on 19 November 1982 at Kettering. Schooled in Rushden, Northamptonshire, Carl joined the Army at age 22, following a school friend into the 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's). Following his initial training at the Army Training Regiment, Winchester and then the Armour Centre, Bovington he began preparations to join his Regiment in Iraq, as a part of 7th Armoured Brigade (The Desert Rats). Throughout his training he proved quick, bright and committed, drawing compliments from his instructors. Having completed basic training Trooper Smith was eager to join his Regiment on operations. Keen to make a difference in Iraq, he deployed to B Squadron, based in Basra Palace, as part of The 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's) Battlegroup. He arrived in theatre on 23 January 2006.

Trooper Carl Smith made a profound impact during the short time he had been in the Regiment, displaying the potential to do well in the Army. Sharp, inquisitive and enthusiastic, Carl carried the hallmarks of a good reconnaissance soldier, impressing everyone on his pre-deployment training in the UK. He adapted quickly to his surroundings in Iraq and relished the demands made of him by this unfamiliar country and the operational environment. During his initial period of familiarisation in theatre, Carl was never still, always seeking opportunities to soldier with his troop and to patrol in the suburbs of Basra and Abu Al Khasib.

Lt Col Charles Crewdson, his Commanding Officer, said:

"Trooper Carl Smith settled in very quickly to regimental soldiering, his early impressions of Iraq were positive and he understood the importance of his mission. He was starting a joint patrol with the Iraqi Army, when tragically his vehicle was involved in an accident. Despite only serving for a short time he had already earned an excellent reputation as a hard worker. As all members of the Regiment who die on active service, his sacrifice will be remembered and never forgotten.

"Carl bore all the trademarks of what makes the British Army great. Keen, intelligent, compassionate and motivated he was moved greatly by those he encountered in Iraq during the course of his patrols.

"Our thoughts are with his family and young son. The Regiment has lost a friend and a soldier brimming with potential. We count ourselves fortunate to have served with such a man."

Trooper Smith's family have issued the following statement:

"Trooper Carl Smith (23) was killed in Iraq whilst serving with the 9th/12th Royal Lancers. He was involved in a road traffic accident whilst doing the job he loved and enjoyed. He was proud to serve his county as a British soldier.

"Paul and Dee, his parents, sister Katherine, partner Carly and son Lewis (3) fully supported his decision to pursue a career in the army, and are immensely proud of him though devastated by his death."

The media are asked to respect the family's privacy at this time.

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #44 on: February 06, 2006, 01:49:28 »
Trooper Carl Smith

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #45 on: February 07, 2006, 23:10:48 »
http://portal.telegraph.co.uk/core/Content/displayPrintable.jhtml?xml=/news/2006/02/07/db0702.xml&site=5

Eric Brooks
(Filed: 07/02/2006)

Eric Brooks, who has died aged 97, commanded the signals section in Popski's Private Army in the Italian campaign.

On the outbreak of the Second World War, Brooks was welcomed back to the Royal Corps of Signals, with which he had served on first enlisting in the Army. He was posted to Cairo where he joined the clandestine Irregular Wireless Operators' School.

Refusing to work out of uniform, Brooks was transferred as a signaller to the Long Range Desert Group, operating in the Libyan desert behind enemy lines.

When his truck was blown up during a raid, he evaded capture by walking many miles back to base. He was so badly dehydrated that his vocal chords shrivelled, leaving him with a gravelly voice for the rest of his life.

Brooks was an exceptional signals operator who could coax wireless transmissions over very long distances from sets with a range of no more than 20 miles.

He was recruited to L Detachment, Special Air Service Brigade, the unit from which 1 SAS was later formed, by Lt-Col David Stirling and took part in raids on Axis airfields and petrol dumps.

At the end of the campaign in North Africa, Brooks was stranded in his wireless truck at M'Saken, when he was found and recruited by Lt-Col Vladimir Peniakoff. Born in Belgium of Russian parentage, Peniakoff, known as "Popski", was in command of No 1 Demolition Squadron.

The squadron became known as Popski's Private Army (PPA) and worked with the Arabs on intelligence-gathering and raiding operations in enemy-occupied territory.

"The arrangement with Brooks was private," Popski said afterwards, " but he stayed with us until the end of the war."

Brooks accompanied PPA to Italy and took part in the landings at Taranto in September 1943. PPA was initially involved in diversionary activities, but was later transformed from a loose, two-patrol unit into an organised raiding force equipped for special operations.

Each patrolman had to be a good navigator and motor mechanic, a competent machine-gunner, demolition expert and resourceful fighter. Brooks, then a sergeant, and a comrade, Sergeant Beautyman, were described by their commanders as wireless geniuses.

Despite operating in primitive and often dangerous conditions, they constructed and operated the WT system, trained the patrolmen and carried out secret monitoring of the airwaves.

The PPA Jeep-borne patrols were in action continuously from mid-June until winter 1944. They splashed through rivers, wound their way down gorges and up mountains, skidding on the greasy, rain-soaked sheep tracks, living on the rooftop of Italy as they skirmished northwards, probing for chinks in the German defences.

Near Perugia, Brooks was given command of the Signals Section. At Sant'Appolinare in Classe, near Ravenna, intervention by Popski saved the basilica and its sixth-century mosaics from destruction by the artillery. In autumn 2005 the city of Ravenna sent Brooks a parchment scroll in gratitude for his part in the rescue operation.

In the last phase of the campaign, PPA captured more than 1,300 prisoners, 16 field guns and many smaller weapons. At the end of the war, it was Brooks who handed Popski the signal slip informing him that Germany had surrendered.

Eric Hamilton Brooks, one of eight children, was born on July 10 1908 in the Holly Tree public house at Addlestone, Surrey, where his father was landlord. An idyllic childhood came to an end when his father died and his mother moved to a small cottage.

Young Eric, together with some of his siblings, was removed to Shaftesbury Homes and went to a local school. Aged 13 he helped the family by working in an aircraft factory and caddying on a golf course. Three years later he enlisted in the Army.

Wireless telegraphy interested him, and he went into the Royal Corps of Signals. Long-distance running in mid-winter at Catterick camp brought a lung infection to the Army's notice and he was discharged.

After the end of the war, Brooks accompanied Popski to Belgium and Switzerland on covert diplomacy in an attempt to bring about the abdication of the King of the Belgians. Brooks then went to work for the Post Office, where he was based in the international cable room.

Ostensibly a telegrapher, he was also used in security operations. These included attempts to monitor the signals being sent from the high-powered wireless transmitter that was used by the spies Peter and Helen Kroger, and visits behind the Iron Curtain.

While Brooks was secretary of the Government Wireless Operators' Association there was some acrimony over the merger with the Post Office Workers' Union, and Brooks later admitted that he had bugged the telephones of Dr Charles (later Lord) Hill, the Postmaster-General, and Clive Jenkins, the general secretary of the Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staffs.

Brooks retired in 1973. He married first, in 1932 (later dissolved), Rose Freelove. He married secondly, in 1949, Kathleen Alcock, who predeceased him.

Eric Brooks died on December 8, and is survived by a daughter from his first marriage and a daughter from his second.

Information appearing on telegraph.co.uk is the copyright of Telegraph Group Limited and must not be reproduced in any medium without licence. For the full copyright statement see Copyright

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #46 on: February 09, 2006, 20:15:43 »
Photo 1)  Comrades from The Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Camerons) bear the coffin of Lance Corporal Allan Douglas.
[Picture: WO2 Shane Wilkinson]

Photo 2)  Comrades from the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards bear the coffin of Corporal Gordon Pritchard.
[Picture: WO2 Shane Wilkinson]

Photo 3)  Comrades from the 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's) bear the coffin of Trooper Carl Smith.
[Picture: WO2 Shane Wilkinson]



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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #47 on: March 02, 2006, 15:42:00 »
http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/DefenceNews/PeopleInDefence/CaptainRichardHolmesAndPrivateLeeEllisKilledInIraq.htm

Captain Richard Holmes and Private Lee Ellis killed in Iraq
1 Mar 06
It is with great sadness and regret that the Ministry of Defence has confirmed the deaths of Captain Richard Holmes and Private Lee Ellis in Al Amarah, Iraq on Tuesday 28 February 2006.

 Captain Holmes and Private Ellis, from 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, were attached to the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards in Al Amarah, Maysaan Province. They were killed when a roadside bomb exploded as they conducted a routine patrol. Tributes have today been paid to the two soldiers by their Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel James Chiswell.

Captain Richard Holmes

Richard Holmes was born on 1st November 1977. He joined the Parachute Regiment after studying law at Liverpool University. He lived in Winchester, Hampshire with his wife, Kate, whom he married shortly before deploying to Iraq in October 2005.

Richard joined the Army in January 2001. After completion of Officer Training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst he was commissioned into The Parachute Regiment. On successful completion of the demanding Pre-Parachute Selection, the Basic Parachute Course at RAF Brize Norton and the Platoon Commander's Battle Course he joined B Company, the Second Battalion The Parachute Regiment. He served with the Battalion in Northern Ireland and also completed an earlier tour in Iraq. He completed an attachment with the The Highlanders before returning to The Parachute Regiment in April 2005 to command the Anti Tank Platoon. He deployed to Maysaan with D Company as part of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards Battle Group in October 2005.

During his time in Maysaan, Captain Holmes worked tirelessly with the local Iraqi Security Forces. His principal work in Iraq was developing and mentoring a co-ordinated Iraqi Operations Centre, a task requiring tact, personality and patience. His efforts to learn Arabic and embrace the local culture, coupled with his natural sparkle and enthusiasm, endeared him greatly to the Iraqis with whom he worked so closely. This in turn made him highly effective in influencing and enhancing the organisation for which he was responsible. A fine ambassador for The Parachute Regiment, he will also be greatly missed by his many friends in The Highlanders and the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

Lieutenant Colonel James Chiswell, his Commanding Officer, said:

"Charming, compassionate and bright, Richard was one of The Parachute Regiment's rising stars.  He brought a warm humour and enormous professionalism to all he touched.  He excelled as a young commander with both The Parachute Regiment and The Highlanders, and was deeply respected by those he led.

"In Iraq he made a real difference, displaying wise judgement and total dedication in his efforts to progress the efficiency of the Iraqi Police in Al Amarah.  His determination to understand and share in the local culture was typical of his positive outlook and, as always, reaped dividends and won him many friends.

"As a reflection of his ability and character, he was due to leave us later this year to take up a prestigious instructor's post as a Platoon Commander at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.  Kind, fun and warm humoured, he was a pleasure to be with and always saw the lighter side of life.

"With his passing, The Parachute Regiment has lost a fine soldier and officer.  Our thoughts are with his wife, family and many friends."

Private Lee Ellis was born on 24th January 1983.  He lived in Wythenshawe, Manchester with his fiancée Sarah and his daughter Courtney.

Private Ellis joined the Army in September 2003 and completed his basic training at the Infantry Training Centre (Catterick).  In April 2004 he joined D Company, the Second Battalion The Parachute Regiment. Suffering from an injury in 2005, he showed typical fortitude and determination to recover.  He deployed to Iraq in October 2005 with D Company and operated in Maysaan Province as part of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards Battle Group.

Private Ellis was a keen sportsman.  An apprentice with Wigan Athletic Football Club, he gave up a career in professional football to join The Parachute Regiment.  A committed Manchester City supporter; he made every effort to watch each televised match.  An equally keen boxer, he looked forward to representing his Company and the Battalion on its return to Colchester.

Private Lee Ellis was not only a comrade but a close friend to many.  He will be sorely missed by all those who were privileged to serve with and know him.  Our thoughts are with his family and young daughter.

Lieutenant Colonel Chiswell said of Private Ellis:

"Bright, enthusiastic and immensely popular, Private Ellis displayed all the qualities of a first class Paratrooper.  His strength of character and dedication were reflected in his determination to overcome injury and to join his friends and comrades on operations in southern Iraq.

"His comradeship stood out; he was always willing to help others, and invariably did so with a smile on his face.  Hardworking, professional and with an irrepressible sense of humour, he showed enormous compassion in his dealing with the local Iraqis he encountered, whether they were Police, civilians or children.

"He was a natural team player who always looked out for others and who was always upbeat and focused.  Above all else he was a total professional, dedicated to his task.  He made a genuine difference in Iraq.

"Private Ellis was an outstanding soldier, comrade and friend.  He will be sorely missed by all those who have served with him and our thoughts are with his fiancée and family."

The media are asked to respect the families' privacy at this time.


Private Lee Ellis
Picture: MOD
Private Lee Ellis

Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #48 on: March 25, 2006, 00:21:41 »
http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/DefenceNews/PeopleInDefence/DeathOfABritishServicemanInAfghanistanCorporalMarkCridge7SignalRegiment.htm

Death of a British Serviceman in Afghanistan – Corporal Mark Cridge, 7 Signal Regiment
24 Mar 06
It is with profound regret that the Ministry of Defence must announce the death of Corporal Mark Cridge who died in Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, on 22 March 2006. His death is being investigated; initial inquiries do not indicate hostile action.

 Corporal Mark Cridge, who was 3 weeks short of his 26th birthday, joined the Army in April 2001, as a Technician. On completion of his trade training he served with 3 (UK) Divisional Signal Regiment, and deployed twice on operations to Kuwait and Iraq. He moved to 7 Signal Regiment last summer, and deployed to Afghanistan on 3 March 2006. He was working as part of a small team providing communications from Camp Bastion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

Lt Col Alan Blackwell, his Commanding Officer, paid tribute to Corporal Cridge:

"Corporal Mark Cridge was an instantly likeable young man. Well respected by all ranks, he was a good all round soldier who clearly enjoyed his trade. Mark was a natural athlete and was always among the first to volunteer to play sport for his Troop or Squadron; he often turned in a good score on the cricket pitch.

"Last summer he enjoyed a mountaineering expedition to Bavaria with friends from the Regiment. Mark trained hard with the Regiment in preparation for the deployment to Afghanistan and was excited about the tour. Our thoughts are with his family and friends. We have all lost a soldier and friend who was very capable, good company and widely respected."


Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Fallen Comrades Allied Forces
« Reply #49 on: March 30, 2006, 20:57:55 »
http://www.defenselink.mil/releases/2006/nr20060330-12729.html

IMMEDIATE RELEASE    No. 261-06
March 30, 2006    
DoD Identifies Army Casualty

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Sgt. 1st Class John T. Stone, 52, of Norwich, Vt., died March 28 in Lashkagar, Afghanistan as a result of enemy mortar and small arms attacks during combat operations.  Stone was assigned to the Army National Guard's 15th Civil Support Team, South Burlington, Vt.

            For further information related to this release, contact Army Public Affairs at (703) 692-2000