Author Topic: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread  (Read 1164390 times)

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3350 on: December 16, 2017, 19:08:38 »
More on Chinese foreign influence/active measures:

Quote
[2016] How Convenient: “Ontario minister Michael Chan defends China’s human-rights record”
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/mark-collins-how-convenient-ontario-minister-michael-chan-defends-chinas-human-rights-record/

[Australian] Laws on foreign influence just the beginning in fight against Chinese coercion
http://www.smh.com.au/comment/laws-on-foreign-influence-just-the-beginning-in-fight-against-chinese-coercion-20171206-gzzr4j.html

Saying the unsayable in Australia’s relations with China
 https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/saying-unsayable-australia-s-relations-china

Plus a recent (career) Canadian ambassador to China:

Trudeau’s China setback was a self-inflicted wound
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/trudeaus-china-setback-was-a-self-inflicted-wound/article37222702/

That ambassador to China (David Mulroney, who also led the "Afghanistan Task Force" under PM Harper) is quoted here:

Quote
Beware effects of China's 'united front' in Canada: former envoy
https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/beware-effects-of-china-s-united-front-in-canada-former-envoy-1.3712754

Also from a pretty hard-line Canadian prof who once worked at our embassy in Beijing:

Quote
Canada-China relations are now ripe for a rethink
http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/burton-canada-china-relations-are-now-ripe-for-a-rethink

Then there is the inimitable Terry Glavin, hard on our comprador class (a nice reversal, with Chinese history in mind: https://www.britannica.com/topic/comprador )

Quote
The whole Liberal establishment covets close China relations... and for what?
http://nationalpost.com/opinion/terry-glavin-the-whole-liberal-establishment-covets-close-china-relations-and-for-what

As Chinese money corrupts western politics, Trudeau's Liberals keep cashing in
http://nationalpost.com/opinion/terry-glavin-liberals-not-keen-to-prohibit-foreign-read-chinese-money-from-influencing-canadian-voters

The Globe and Mail, for its part, has been hard on the China case for quite a while:

Quote
Ethnic Chinese Abroad: Once a Dragon, Always a Dragon Says Beijing 
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/05/09/mark-collins-ethnic-chinese-abroad-once-a-dragon-always-a-dragon-says-beijing/

Mark
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« Last Edit: December 16, 2017, 20:55:06 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3351 on: December 19, 2017, 13:53:00 »
Long article on Wired about the Chinese "Social Credit" system. This is an interesting way to use soft power to nudge or push citizens into behaviours desired by the State. Canada is rolling out the "Carrot" app which has similar attributes. You don't have to guess what happens to people with low ""Social Credit" scores.....

Archived article: https://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,127076.0.html

https://www.wired.com/story/age-of-social-credit/

Quote
MARA HVISTENDAHL
BUSINESS
12.14.1706:00 AM
INSIDE CHINA'S VAST NEW EXPERIMENT IN SOCIAL RANKING

IN 2015, WHEN Lazarus Liu moved home to China after studying logistics in the United Kingdom for three years, he quickly noticed that something had changed: Everyone paid for everything with their phones. At McDonald’s, the convenience store, even at mom-and-pop restaurants, his friends in Shanghai used mobile payments. Cash, Liu could see, had been largely replaced by two smartphone apps: Alipay and WeChat Pay. One day, at a vegetable market, he watched a woman his mother’s age pull out her phone to pay for her groceries. He decided to sign up.

To get an Alipay ID, Liu had to enter his cell phone number and scan his national ID card. He did so reflexively. Alipay had built a reputation for reliability, and compared to going to a bank managed with slothlike indifference and zero attention to customer service, signing up for Alipay was almost fun. With just a few clicks he was in. Alipay’s slogan summed up the experience: “Trust makes it simple.”

Alipay turned out to be so convenient that Liu began using it multiple times a day, starting first thing in the morning, when he ordered breakfast through a food delivery app. He realized that he could pay for parking through Alipay’s My Car feature, so he added his driver’s license and license plate numbers, as well as the engine number of his Audi. He started making his car insurance payments with the app. He booked doctors’ appointments there, skipping the chaotic lines for which Chinese hospitals are famous. He added friends in Alipay’s built-in social network. When Liu went on vacation with his fiancée (now his wife) to Thailand, they paid at restaurants and bought trinkets with Alipay. He stored whatever money was left over, which wasn’t much once the vacation and car were paid for, in an Alipay money market account. He could have paid his electricity, gas, and internet bills in Alipay’s City Service section. Like many young Chinese who had become enamored of the mobile payment services offered by Alipay and WeChat, Liu stopped bringing his wallet when he left the house.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Dimsum

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3352 on: December 19, 2017, 20:35:19 »
You don't have to guess what happens to people with low ""Social Credit" scores.....

Nope, you don't. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nosedive

Philip II of Macedon to Spartans (346 BC):  "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city."

Reply:  "If."

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3353 on: December 28, 2017, 17:29:54 »
Now, does anyone expect Justin Trudeau's comprador governement to do anything like the Aussies (not that the RCMP would have the resources to do much in any event)?

Quote
AFP ready to enforce new spying laws

Chinese spies or Russian agents of influence may soon have the Australian Federal Police knocking on their door with the nation’s top cop, AFP Commissioner Andrew Colvin, confirming police were preparing to prosecute the new foreign interference laws.

Mr Colvin said discussions were under way between the AFP and domestic security agency ASIO on how many potential criminal investigations might arise from the Turnbull government’s revamped foreign interference laws.

The laws introduce an array of new offences, including the crime of unlawful foreign interference which makes it illegal to engage in covert attempts to influence Australian politics. The laws also require foreign operators, such as state-owned foreign media outlets, to register as foreign agents. A failure would breach the law.

The combined effect of the legislation is to criminalise behaviour that was once mainly of concern to intelligence agencies, necessitating a much greater role for police, who are already flat to the boards managing the surging terrorism threat.

This, too, was under consideration by the police, Mr Colvin said.

“We are looking at the nature of new offences and we’re talking to our partners about the number of investigations we’re likely to conduct,’’ Mr Colvin said. “We’re also looking at the kind of investigative capabilities we’ll need.’’

The new laws are likely to create a fresh resourcing headache for the AFP, which is already straining to keep abreast of the threat posed by Islamic State-inspired terrorism.

Proving the crime of foreign interference is also likely to rely heavily on surveillance resources and technique.

The government hopes that the creation of new foreign interference offences will act as a stiff deterrent to would-be foreign agents, who in the case of China, are often Australian citizens sympathetic to Beijing’s cause [emphasis added, imagine our gov't suggesting that].

At the same time, former attorney-general George Brandis has made it clear the laws are much more focused and clear than similar regimes overseas and were written to be used. However, the laws have infuriated the Chinese government. its embassy in Canberra earlier this month accused the Turnbull government of undermining “mutual trust’’...
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/national-security/afp-ready-to-enforce-new-spying-laws/news-story/d4986a9a7fae05a9068de5d440f658be

To its great credit the Globe and Mail , for its part, is hard on the China case in Canada, e.g.:
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/two-conservative-senators-business-venture-linked-to-china/article37340503/

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/beijing-foots-bill-for-visits-to-china-by-canadian-senators-mps/article37162592/

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/editorials/globe-editorial-does-justin-trudeau-get-china/article37275351/

Mark
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Offline Dimsum

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3354 on: December 28, 2017, 18:19:47 »
Quote
The government hopes that the creation of new foreign interference offences will act as a stiff deterrent to would-be foreign agents, who in the case of China, are often Australian citizens sympathetic to Beijing’s cause [emphasis added, imagine our gov't suggesting that].

I don't know - my take on reading that sentence was that the Australian (the newspaper) suggested it, especially the second half of the sentence, not the government.  Aside from tough talk, it'd be interesting to see how that would pan out as China is Australia's largest trading partner.
Philip II of Macedon to Spartans (346 BC):  "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city."

Reply:  "If."

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3355 on: December 28, 2017, 19:25:25 »
Dimsum: one can read between the lines here in ASIO's (Australian Security Intelligence Organisation) 2016-17 annual report:

Quote
...
Countering espionage, foreign interference and malicious insiders

...We identified foreign powers clandestinely seeking to shape the opinions of members of the Australian public, media organisations and government officials in order to advance their country’s own political objectives. Ethnic and religious communities in Australia were also the subject of covert influence operations designed to diminish their criticism of foreign governments. These activities—undertaken covertly to obscure the role of foreign governments—represent a threat to our sovereignty, the integrity of our national institutions and the exercise of our citizens’ rights...
https://www.asio.gov.au/AR2017-01.html

Plus in another section:

Quote
...
Espionage and foreign interference

...Interference by foreign actors can undermine Australia’s sovereignty by advancing a foreign state’s cause through covertly interfering in Australia’s political system and seeking to unduly influence public perceptions of issues. Foreign interference in Australia’s diaspora communities through harassment or other means can erode the freedoms enjoyed by all people living in Australia...
https://www.asio.gov.au/AR2017-03.html

News story:

Quote
ASIO battling spy threat from China and Russia
...
ASIO’s update comes amid a debate about Chinese government influence in Australia and after a warning from former ­Defence Department head ­Dennis Richardson about espionage operations in the country.

He said China was not the only country undertaking such operations.

Neil Fergus, the chief executive of international consultancy Intelligent Risk, said there was a “fine line” between legitimate acts of soft diplomacy and foreign ­interference, and he believed that had been crossed by China in its activities in Australia.

“(The government is) putting pressure on individuals and to the extent it’s been alleged that family members of some individuals have been threatened back in mainland China,” Mr Fergus told The Australian.

He said the Russian government’s activities related more to “disinformation” campaigns, and other smaller countries were also threatening Australians.

“There are some Asian countries that monitor Australian citizens who came from their countries,” Mr Fergus said.

A spokesman for Attorney-General George Brandis, who oversees ASIO, said he had previously warned about the threat of interference from foreign intelligence and undertaken a comprehensive review of Australia’s espionage and foreign interference laws.

Labor MP Anthony Byrne, who is deputy chairman of the parliamentary joint committee on intelligence and security, said the report was a wake-up call to the public and policymakers...
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/national-security/asio-battling-spy-threat-from-china-and-russia/news-story/78ae4df93a6e9e3e664b28bdd1e88b96

Lots more if link just above doesn't work
https://www.google.ca/search?q=These+activities+...+represent+a+threat+to+our+sovereignty%2C+the+%C2%ADintegrity+of+our+national+institutions+and+the+exercise+of+our+citizens%E2%80%99+rights&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b&gfe_rd=cr&dcr=0&ei=74dFWqTHH-ufXrGHl_gL

Rather different from Canada, eh?

Mark
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« Last Edit: December 28, 2017, 19:34:32 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3356 on: December 29, 2017, 13:52:25 »
More on CCP's foreign interference/active measures/propaganda abroad--Justin Trudeau open your eyes--excerpts:

Quote
United Front Work after the 19th Party Congress

Lost in the sea of political rhetoric and policies laid out during the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) 19th Congress in October were references to United Front Work—an important group of policies that the CCP uses to forge consensus at home and exert influence abroad (Xinhua, November 3). Communist Party General Secretary Xi Jinping’s remarks on the United Front deserve particular attention...
 
The recent public extension of the [United Front Work] Department’s efforts to any place with a sizeable population of Chinese emigrants, students or even visitors, also mean it is now relevant to many foreign governments.

An increasingly sensitive united front constituency, the established Chinese Diaspora groups around the world and the groups of PRC raised Chinese entrepreneurs, emigrants and students, all subsumed under the label ‘Overseas Chinese’ will be united with through ‘the maintenance of extensive contacts’. In 2017, as result of united front work in places like Australia and New Zealand, the relevance of Xi’s emphasis was starting to become apparent even though the groundwork had often been laid years or even decades before.

While the CCP has been emphatic in rejecting what it calls interference in China’s domestic affairs, if the recent cases of Chinese influence over politicians in Australia and New Zealand are any indication, we might well see a dramatic increase in United Front-related interference elsewhere...
https://jamestown.org/program/united-front-work-19th-party-congress/

Mark
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Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3357 on: December 30, 2017, 06:37:41 »
There's an interesting story in the Globe and Mail about how the Chinese are trying to gain better control of the Muslim Uyghur in Xinjiang province in the far North-West of China:

Quote
"It's a mix of the North Korean aspiration for total control of thought and action, with the racialized implementation of apartheid South Africa and Chinese AI [artificial intelligence] and surveillance technology," said Rian Thum, a historian at Loyola University in New Orleans. "It's a truly remarkable situation, in a global sense."

It's worth the read ...
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3358 on: January 04, 2018, 12:18:43 »
The South China Morning Post reports on the progress of China's third aircraft carrier  which is being built in Shanghai Jiangnan Shipyard. It is reported that "The sources all said it was too early to say when the third vessel would be launched, but China plans to have four aircraft carrier battle groups in service by 2030 ... [and] ... Shipbuilders and technicians from Shanghai and Dalian are working on the third vessel, which will have a displacement of about 80,000 tonnes – 10,000 tonnes more than the Liaoning, according to another source close to the PLA Navy."

It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3359 on: January 05, 2018, 13:36:31 »
Whilst on the PLA Navy aircraft carrier front:

Quote
China has started building its third aircraft carrier, military sources say
Work on the vessel, which will use a hi-tech launch system, began at a Shanghai shipyard last year but it is not known when it will be completed

China started building its third aircraft carrier, with a hi-tech launch system, at a Shanghai shipyard last year, according to sources close to the People’s Liberation Army.

One of the sources said Shanghai Jiangnan Shipyard Group was given the go-ahead to begin work on the vessel after military leaders met in Beijing following the annual sessions of China’s legislature and top political advisory body in March.

“But the shipyard is still working on the carrier’s hull, which is expected to take about two years,” the source said. “Building the new carrier will be more complicated and challenging than the other two ships.”

China has been trying to build up a blue-water navy that can operate globally and support its maritime security, but it so far has only one aircraft carrier, the Liaoning – a repurposed Soviet ship it bought from Ukraine that went into service in 2012.

Its first Chinese designed and built aircraft carrier, the Type 001A, is expected to go into full service later this year.

The sources all said it was too early to say when the third vessel would be launched, but China plans to have four aircraft carrier battle groups in service by 2030, according to naval experts.

Shipbuilders and technicians from Shanghai and Dalian are working on the third vessel, which will have a displacement of about 80,000 tonnes – 10,000 tonnes more than the Liaoning [emphasis added]“China has set up a strong and professional aircraft carrier team since early 2000, when it decided to retrofit the Varyag [the unfinished vessel China bought from Ukraine] to launch as the Liaoning, and it hired many Ukrainian experts ... as technical advisers,” the second source said.

The sources also confirmed that the new vessel, the CV-18, will use a launch system that is more advanced than the Soviet-designed ski-jump systems used in its other two aircraft carriers.

Its electromagnetic aircraft launch system will mean less wear and tear on the planes and it will allow more aircraft to be launched in a shorter time than other systems [emphasis added], according to another source close to the PLA Navy...
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2126883/china-has-started-building-its-third-aircraft-carrier

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3360 on: January 05, 2018, 15:51:45 »
Meanwhile China looks like establishing a fairly serious naval foothold in Arabian Sea/Indian Ocean--Indians will be quite unhappy (and US?):

Quote
First Djibouti ... now Pakistan port earmarked for a Chinese overseas naval base, sources say
The facility would be similar to one in operation in African nation, offering logistics and maintenance services to PLA Navy vessels

Beijing plans to build its second offshore naval base near a strategically important Pakistani port following the opening of its first facility in Djibouti on the Horn of Africa last year.

Beijing-based military analyst Zhou Chenming said the base near the Gwadar port on the Arabian Sea would be used to dock and maintain naval vessels, as well as provide other logistical support services.

“China needs to set up another base in Gwadar for its warships because Gwadar is now a civilian port,” Zhou said.

“It’s a common practice to have separate facilities for warships and merchant vessels because of their different operations. Merchant ships need a bigger port with a lot of space for warehouses and containers, but warships need a full range of maintenance and logistical support services.”

Another source close to the People’s Liberation Army confirmed that the navy would set up a base near Gwadar similar to the one already up and running in Djibouti.

“Gwadar port can’t provide specific services for warships ... Public order there is in a mess. It is not a good place to carry out military logistical support,” the source said...

Gwadar port is a key part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, a centrepiece of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s broader “Belt and Road Initiative” to link China through trade and infrastructure to Africa and Europe and beyond. The corridor is a multibillion-dollar set of infrastructure projects linking China and Pakistan, and includes a series of road and transport links...
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2127040/first-djibouti-now-pakistan-port-earmarked-chinese


Paks deny naval base plan, but with bad relations with US and Trump cutting security assistance...

Quote
Pakistan denies reports of Chinese military base near Gwadar
Pakistan’s Foreign Office (FO) spokesman Mohammad Faisal dismissed the reports as “propaganda” against the development of CPEC and strengthening Pakistan and China relations...
http://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/pakistan-denies-reports-of-chinese-military-base-near-gwadar/story-5Qkpxhw62aF80Jpo35ux3J.html

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It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline Thucydides

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3362 on: January 06, 2018, 19:21:59 »
The tricky part of the "Chain of Pearls" strategy is ensuring the people who you paid off to get those ports stay bought when you really need them. The Chinese might discover their choice of partnerships was not entirely well thought out.....
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3363 on: January 20, 2018, 13:19:17 »
Whilst on the traditional spook front:

Quote
Alleged CIA China turncoat Lee may have compromised U.S. spies in Russia too

 The arrest last week of a former CIA officer suspected of spying for China exposed one of the most significant intelligence breaches in American history. But the damage is even worse than first reported, sources familiar with the matter tell NBC News.

A secret FBI–CIA task force investigating the case concluded that the Chinese government penetrated the CIA's method of clandestine communication with its spies, using that knowledge to arrest and execute at least 20 CIA informants, according to multiple current and former government officials.

American officials suspect China then shared that information with Russia, which employed it to expose, arrest and possibly even kill American spies in that country, said the current and former officials, who declined to be named discussing a highly sensitive matter. The possible sharing with Russia has not previously been reported.

 Those sobering findings, sometime after the inquiry began in 2012, led the CIA to temporarily shut down human spying in China, and to overhaul the way it communicates with its assets around the world, according to former government officials familiar with the case.

It was a shocking blow to an American spy agency that prides itself on its field operations. There was also a devastating human cost: Some 20 CIA sources were executed by the Chinese government, two former officials said — a higher number of dead than initially reported by NBC News and the New York Times. Then an unknown number of Russian assets also disappeared, sources say.

Eventually a top secret joint FBI-CIA task force investigation led authorities to suspect that former CIA case officer Jerry Chun Shing Lee had been spying for China. Lee, 53, was arrested this week and charged, not with espionage, but with a single count of possessing classified information.

U.S. officials told NBC News they don't believe Lee ever will be charged as a spy, in part because they don't have all the proof they might need, and in part because they would not want to air the evidence they do have in a public courtroom...
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/china/cia-china-turncoat-lee-may-have-compromised-u-s-spies-n839316

Earlier:

Quote
Solving the CIA’s Mass Murder Mystery [by former NSA officer John Schindler]
http://observer.com/2018/01/fbi-arrests-ex-cia-officer-accused-of-compromising-chinese-informants/

Ex-C.I.A. Officer Suspected of Compromising Chinese Informants Is Arrested
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/16/us/politics/cia-china-mole-arrest-jerry-chun-shing-lee.html

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3364 on: January 29, 2018, 19:40:54 »
But Justin Trudeau and our pseudo-capitalist Canadian compradors just don't care:

Quote
AFP and ASIO to co-operate on China investigations

Australia’s police and intelligence chiefs are ramping up efforts to charge spies and counter foreign interference as senior officials concede the previous "catch and deport" system needs overhauling.

Fairfax Media has confirmed ASIO chief Duncan Lewis and federal police commissioner Andrew Colvin met earlier this month to discuss a new law enforcement regime that could see federal police dedicated to investigating foreign interference and espionage.

Until now, police have not been directly involved, while intelligence agencies have tended to deport people suspected of spying or foreign influence, instead of prosecuting them under the espionage law.

The recent meeting between Mr Lewis and Mr Colvin comes amid efforts by officials in Canberra and Washington to place the countering of foreign interference, influence and intelligence operations on a similar footing to tackling terrorism [emphasis added].

...new submissions to the joint parliamentary committee on intelligence and security provide ballast for those arguing for more transparency of Australian organisations that are closely aligned to the Chinese government, and its main vehicle for foreign interference, the United Front Work Department. Increasing transparency is a key objective of the proposed laws.

A lengthy submission by prominent left-leaning academic Professor Clive Hamilton names dozens of United Front organisations in Australia, describing their cultivation of Labor and Liberal politicians. The submission is the most detailed expose´ of Chinese government influence operations in Australia to ever be published.
Mr Hamilton’s submission states that “the core of Beijing’s presence on university campuses” is represented by at least 37 Chinese Students and Scholars Associations “covering nearly all Australian universities, including all Group of Eight universities, as well as the CSIRO”.

“CSSAs play a central role in the Chinese government’s efforts to monitor, control and intervene in the lives of Chinese students in Australia and to limit academic freedom on universities,” the submission states...
http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/afp-and-asio-to-co-operate-on-china-investigations-20180129-p4yz0n.html

See also:

Quote
China vs America: the espionage story of our time
...
Another factor to take into consideration is the successful Chinese propaganda campaign that has been playing out in the United States for years. One reason why America may not yet view China as the growing competitor that it is is because more than 100 Beijing-funded ‘Confucius Institutes’ have been established on US college campuses (and more than 500 worldwide), promoting a benign picture of China and often pressuring colleges to shy away from events that would criticise Beijing...
https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2018/01/china-vs-america-the-espionage-story-of-our-time/

More on what Confucius Institutes say:
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/?s=confucius

Mark
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Offline daftandbarmy

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"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3366 on: January 30, 2018, 19:11:49 »
Now an RCMP/FBI angle that so far has got very little Canadian media coverage--story is Jan. 25 (!):

Quote
McGill professor denies involvement in alleged theft of U.S. military technology
Ishiang Shih says the allegations he may have been involved in theft of military technology are part of a misunderstanding.

An FBI investigation into a threat to U.S. national security — with military secrets apparently being given to the Chinese government — has landed at the door of a McGill professor.

Last week, RCMP officers raided the Brossard home of McGill associate professor Ishiang Shih, who teaches electrical and computer engineering.

According to an FBI affidavit, money was transferred by wire from the U.S. to a Brossard company registered in Shih’s name. The money was sent by Shih’s brother, Yi-Chi Shih — who is also an associate professor of engineering at the University of California in Los Angeles.

Yi-Chi Shih was arrested Friday, Jan. 19 in Pasadena along with Kiet Ahn Mai. Federal prosecutors say the men conspired to have a U.S. company make special high-speed computer chips that were illegally exported to a Chinese company connected to Shih, according to the affidavit. The affidavit alleged a scheme to defraud a U.S. company of its technology and divert it to China unlawfully.

Authorities say the chips have a number of commercial and military uses, including radar and electronic warfare applications, and that the chips that were exported to China were done in violation of national security laws.
Reached by La Presse this week, Ishiang Shih said the allegations that he may have been involved in theft of military technology are part of a misunderstanding. He added that he is in the process of looking for a lawyer.

A home registered to Shih and his wife was raided by the RCMP on Jan. 19 and documents were seized. La Presse reported the raid is part of the ongoing FBI probe into the theft of military technology involving the creation of chips used in radar systems, signal jamming and anti-signal jamming systems, and that some of the technology was turned over to China. However, Thom Mrozek, a spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney General, would not confirm to the Montreal Gazette Thursday that Ishiang Shih was part of the investigation.

Ishiang Shih was mentioned in the affidavit as having received a shipment from UPS in connection with the investigation. The package was shipped to McGill’s McConnell Engineering building.

The FBI investigation monitored communications between the two brothers both by text messages and email about the shipment. Yi-Chi Shih’s travel was also monitored, and his lengthy travel itinerary included several trips to China and Montreal during a 10-year period.

Ishiang Shih has a business registered in his name called JYS Technologies. The business’s address is a detached home on Auteuil Ave. in Brossard that was sitting empty on Thursday. There were notes posted on two of the windows, with the letterhead of the Directeur des poursuites criminelles et pénales, the public prosecutions department, stating that the house was being monitored. Anyone who noticed any vandalism, negligence or theft was urged to call a private security firm.

According to a neighbour, a Chinese family lived in the house for several years, but the house has sat empty for the last year.

The home registered to Ishiang Shih is located a few blocks farther west on Auteuil Ave...
http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/mcgill-professor-denies-fbi-claim-he-stole-military-technology-report

Mark
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3367 on: January 31, 2018, 14:56:39 »
Start of a nice piece by South China Morning Post's (leading English Hong Kong daily) man in "Hongcouver":

Quote
Does Canada really have more in common with China than with the US? Democracy, the NHL and an 8,891km border suggest not

Justin Trudeau’s man in Beijing, Ambassador John McCallum, has become possessed of a novel notion – that Canada now is more closely aligned in important ways with China than it is with the United States.

Yes, that United States, the one with which Canada shares its most important military alliance, the concepts of universal suffrage and representative elected government, more than US$600 billion in annual trade, the National Hockey League and an 8,891km border.

So, the ambassador’s observations last week raise a number of important questions, not least of which is whether McCallum has recently received a blow to the head or otherwise taken leave of his senses...
http://www.scmp.com/news/world/united-states-canada/article/2131471/does-canada-really-have-more-common-china-us

Read on.

Mark
Ottawa
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3368 on: February 06, 2018, 09:52:02 »
Also from the SCMP: "China’s military fires up world first in revolutionary rail gun technology."

     "Photographs of a rail gun mounted on a warship docked in Wuhan, Hubei province, have surfaced on Chinese military websites in the last week,
      indicating the People’s Liberation Army Navy is testing the electromagnetic weapon and has been able to make it more compact ... [but] ...
      sources close to Chinese military told the South China Morning Post that the destroyer’s propulsion system and internal design were not suited for the rail gun .. [and] ...
      The gun in the photographs was installed on a Type-072 landing ship refitted to house the bulky electrical equipment."
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3369 on: February 06, 2018, 12:27:53 »
Recent studies are showing that the Chinese are becoming the largest source of innovators on the globe, we used to be able to maintain a technology edge, but those days may be fading. The loss of industry appears to have a direct result on the innovation that a society has. Whether this was China's aim, or a useful byproduct for them, is unclear.   

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3370 on: February 08, 2018, 13:04:46 »
Very interesting--and relevant to plans in US Nuclear Posture Review to have a few SLBMs, each with a single low-yield nuke:

Quote
China plans sea-based anti-missile shields ‘for Asia-Pacific and Indian Ocean’
Beijing carried out successful test of mid-course defence system on Monday

The assessment came as Beijing announced it had carried out a successful test of its ground-based mid-course defence system on Monday.

Testing of the anti-ballistic missile system that could shield China from a ballistic missile attack is part of efforts to catch up with the top nuclear nations with anti-missile technology, the United States and Russia. China previously carried out tests of the system in 2010 and 2013.

Beijing is also working on a sea-based system for the Asia-Pacific region to breach the cold war era line of containment, according to observers. The “first island chain” is a series of archipelagos lying between China and the world’s largest ocean that Beijing says has been used by the United States as a natural barrier to contain it since the cold war.

“China’s sea-based anti-missile system aims to defend both its territory and overseas interests, because sea-based defence systems will be set up wherever its warships can go,” said Song Zhongping, a military commentator on Phoenix Television. “The first area it will target is the Asia-Pacific region and the Indian Ocean to protect its overseas interests.”

China has been trying to build up a blue-water navy that can operate globally and safeguard its maritime interests. Observers have said Beijing plans to have four aircraft carrier battle groups in service by 2030. And with three-quarters of its oil imports passing through the Indian Ocean or Strait of Malacca, Beijing is looking to boost maritime defence.

“With the US and other countries taking on the Indo-Pacific strategy to counter China, Beijing will definitely deploy anti-missile systems in these areas in response,” said Song, a former member of the People’s Liberation Army’s Second Artillery Corps.

Macau-based military expert Antony Wong Dong said China had developed a new generation sea-based HQ-26 anti-missile system with an ultra long-range 3,500km cruise missile [?]. The system is expected to be installed on the country’s biggest destroyer, the Type 055, which has a maximum displacement of 13,500 tonnes...


Mark
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3371 on: February 11, 2018, 13:18:44 »
PLAAF says J-20 operational but...

Quote
Why China’s first stealth fighter was rushed into service with inferior engines
Problems encountered in development of new WS-15 engine mean PLA Air Force’s first J-20s are not so stealthy at supersonic speeds

China rushed its first advanced stealth fighter jet into service ahead of schedule last year, using stopgap engines, in the face of rising security challenges in the region, the South China Morning Post has learned.

But that means its capabilities will be severely limited, affecting its manoeuvrability and fuel efficiency as well as its stealthiness at supersonic speeds.

Without saying how many were in operation, the People’s Liberation Army Air Force confirmed on Friday that the J-20, the country’s fifth-generation fighter, had entered combat service, meaning it was combat-ready.

However, the aircraft was equipped with inferior engines designed for earlier warplanes when it first joined the air force in March last year because “critical problems” with its tailor-made WS-15 engine, exposed by an accident in 2015, had not been fixed, two independent military sources told the Post.

“The WS-15 engine designed for the J-20 exploded during a ground running test in 2015,” one source said, adding that no one was injured in the accident.

“The explosion indicated the WS-15 is not reliable, and so far there is no fundamental solution to overcome such a problem … that’s why the J-20 is using WS-10B engines now.”

The WS-10B is a modified version of the WS-10 Taihang engine, which was designed for the country’s fourth-generation J-10 and J-11 fighters.

The explosion was confirmed by another source close to the military, who said the reasons it happened were complicated, with one being the quality control of its single-crystal turbine blades, the key component for such a powerful turbofan engine.

...the thrust-to-weight ratio of the original WS-10 engine was only 7.5, while that of the WS-10B tops out at about nine. The thrust-to-weight ratio of the all-direction, vector turbofan WS-15 Emei engine is more than 10 – one of the basic requirements for giving the J-20 “supercruise” ability.

Supercruise allows stealth fighters like the US’ F-22 Raptor to fly at supersonic speeds without using afterburners, making them harder to detect. The F-22 is powered by the world’s most advanced jet engine, the Pratt & Whitney F119.

But achieving supercruise would require the single-crystal turbine blades of the WS-15 engine to cope with temperatures even more extreme than those handled by the WS-10...


http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2130718/why-chinas-first-stealth-fighter-was-rushed-service

Lots more.

Mark
Ottawa
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 15:02:03 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3372 on: February 13, 2018, 17:22:50 »
Must-read from a Canadian who knows China very well (have heard Chinese is what he speaks at home):

Quote
Burton: Canada must smarten up on its China policy

If you believe the Chinese Xinhua News Agency, Canada is blithely considering a Chinese Communist proposal to sell out the liberal values that define global institutions such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization, in favour of a made-in-China model that will serve Beijing’s authoritarian nationalist aspirations.

China’s official state news agency said that Song Tao – who heads the Communist Party Central Committee’s International Liaison Department – briefed Canadian officials last month on Beijing’s plan to displace the United States as the world’s superpower by “building of a community with a shared future for mankind,” which Xinhua said is “not only important to China but bears profound interest for the rest of the world.”

The decisions being made now are going to radically change the values of global diplomacy and justice for the next century or more. What Canada needs to do is seriously rethink its approach to China, in order to meet the challenge of China’s rise.

A good start is to recognize the yawning need for regulations that monitor Western public servants and politicians who, after they retire from government, go into lucrative businesses and consultancies funded by China-related sources.

When former officials enrich themselves with Beijing’s money, once they’re no longer managing China-related policy, it raises huge questions about whether these people had been compromised in defending Canada’s national interests vis-à-vis China while in office. A post-retirement second career, trading on their China-related “friendships” cultivated in government service, is just not OK.

Multi-ethnic nations such as Canada should encourage citizens of Chinese origin to seek political office; we need legislatures that reflect our diversity. But the sole legitimate function of a politician is to serve the purposes of their nation of citizenship. Any politicians with divided loyalties who spend a lot of time in China for vaguely defined purposes should not have a voice in policymaking impinging on the interests of China in Canada.

And, obviously, Canadian political parties should not be accepting funding from foreign sources, indirectly or otherwise. Most Western nations’ think tanks that advise on China relations routinely accept funding from China-related sources. And our media often provide an influential platform to apologist pundits whose grants and China travel are on Beijing’s dime through “exchanges.”

Canada indeed urgently needs a lot more expertise on China so we can better realize our interests with that country, but we should pay for it ourselves.

We also need to get more resources to our police and security agencies to counter Chinese subversion. Any accredited diplomat who menaces or harasses people in Canada, including ethnic Chinese democracy activists or members of the Tibetan and Uyghur communities, in ways that are incompatible with their diplomatic status should be declared persona non grata and sent home.

Likewise, Chinese state security agents who enter Canada under false pretences for the same purposes should be tracked down and criminally charged.

Getting serious about defending against subversion is another important national security concern. Ottawa must expend more energy combating Chinese political, military and economic espionage, and put more resources into identifying people who transfer Canadian secrets and restricted technologies to agents of the Chinese state.

Beyond our own borders, democracy in Taiwan and Hong Kong should be celebrated, but we shun their progressive leaders who share our values because China tells us to – or else. Canadian leaders should continue to meet with the Dalai Lama periodically, as a legitimate expression of our concern over the situation of Tibetans in China. We must apply our human rights standards equally to all people.

Finally, it is shocking that there is even a debate over whether Beijing, through the China Communications Construction Company, should be allowed to purchase Canada’s largest publicly traded construction company, Aecon Group. This in itself reveals serious flaws in Canada’s China policy.

Aecon helped build the CN Tower, Vancouver’s Skytrain, the St. Lawrence Seaway and is about to work on the Darlington nuclear power plant. The growing public outcry against the sale led the government to announce this week that it will order a full national security review. But we will never know what the review indicates as cabinet will assess it in secret.

If Ottawa bows to Chinese pressure and allows this sale, expect the new version of Aecon to enter unrealistically competitive bids on critical Canadian infrastructure projects, and the Chinese military to have the blueprints of all past and future Aecon projects in perpetuity for their own use, or to share with North Korea should it work that way.

The Aecon purchase is just one small piece, but a large indicator, of a larger coordinated Chinese Communist plan. Let’s come to our senses and just say “no.”

Charles Burton is an associate professor of political science at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont. and is a former counsellor at the Canadian embassy in Beijing.
http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/burton-canada-must-smarten-up-on-its-china-policy

More on Prof. Burton:
http://spartan.ac.brocku.ca/~cburton/

Mark
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3373 on: February 19, 2018, 19:36:45 »
Whilst really down under, in New Zealand--Justin Trudeau and LPC wake up and smell the Maotai:

Quote
Quote
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern orders security agencies to look into case of burgled professor


The Prime Minister today weighed in on the mysterious case of the professor and the break-ins, instructing the nation's intelligence agencies to look into claims made by a Christchurch-based China expert.

Last week the Herald broke news University of Canterbury academic Anne-Marie Brady told an Australian parliamentary committee she linked her work to a spate of recent burglaries and her sources on the Chinese mainland had been interrogated by state security officials.

Brady gained international profile in September after publishing research detailing the extent of China's influence campaigns in New Zealand focusing on a nexus of political donations, appointment of directorships and information management.

Brady told the Australian parliament her office on campus was broken into in December, and last week her home was burgled - with computers, phones and USB storage devices stolen with other obvious valuables ignored by thieves.

 The latter event was preceded by an anonymous letter detailing push-back against those not toeing the official line out of Beijing and warning: "You are next."

The matter is being investigated by the police.

At her post-Cabinet press conference today the Prime Minister said she first became aware of the affair through media reports  [emphasis added, curious] and expressed alarm over Brady's claims.

"I think anyone would be concerned [about] any criminal act if it were in response to the work she's doing," Ardern said.

She said as Minister responsible for national security and intelligence she was following up the matter and would "certainly be asking some questions"...
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11997764

Mark
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3374 on: February 26, 2018, 19:14:35 »
USAF secretary on China vs Russia as "pacing threat" (NORAD implications?):

Quote
How U.S. Air Force Is Preparing For War With China

The U.S. Air Force is reimagining the way it fights on the modern battlefield in preparation for any potential clash with China.

As the Pentagon looks to pivot from the counterterrorism fight in the Middle East to “great-power” conflict, the “pacing threat” for the Air Force is not Russia but China, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson told Aviation Week Feb. 21 ahead of the Air Force Association’s (AFA) annual Air Warfare Symposium. While Russia also is a threat to its neighbors, it is not changing as quickly as China, she says.

“When we look at what the Air Force has to do, the Air Force has to be prepared for either of those threats, but because China is innovating faster, we consider that to be our pacing threat,” Wilson says.

Now, armed with the biggest infusion of cash for research and development the service has seen in years, Air Force military and civilian leaders are trying to find smarter ways to counter that threat. The fiscal 2019 budget request lays the groundwork for the Air Force to accelerate a next-generation fighter family of systems, with a renewed focus on electronic warfare, as well as to build a sophisticated battle management system to more effectively image the battlefield and improve the resilience and agility of critical space assets.

To ensure air superiority well into the century, the Air Force is developing a family of systems dubbed “Next-Generation Air Dominance” (NGAD). This year, the service added $2.7 billion over the next five years to accelerate NGAD, bringing total spending over that time period on the program to almost $10 billion.

The effort will include a “renewed emphasis” on electronic warfare, Wilson says, declining to elaborate.

It is unclear if NGAD will include a next-generation fighter to replace the Lockheed Martin F-22 or F-35 or both. Top service officials have previously disclosed details of a future platform called “Penetrating Counter Air” (PCA), a new air superiority fighter. The service is working on a more powerful, fuel-efficient engine to extend the range of the PCA, as well as advanced stealth technology to allow it to avoid enemy radars, Gen. Mike Holmes, head  of Air Combat Command, told Aviation Week in August (AW&ST Sept. 4-17, 2017, p. 29).

Such a capability will be critical as potential adversaries develop ever more lethal weapons, such as Russia’s S-400 surface-to-air missile system and the Sukhoi Su-57 stealth fighter, Holmes said at the time...
http://aviationweek.com/defense/how-us-air-force-preparing-war-china

Mark
Ottawa
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