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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #325 on: August 29, 2017, 15:41:26 »
Meanwhile Boeing now going after Indian Navy with Make-in-India Super Hornet:

Quote
US Boeing FA-18 Super Hornet offered under Made in India initiative; will Indian Navy get this jet?
...
US aerospace major Boeing Company made a push for Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet to meet Indian Naval Carrier platform requirement, and said they could be produced in India under Make in India initiative. Briefing media persons in New Delhi, ahead of a meeting between the company executives and the Indian Navy on Tuesday, Dan Gillian, vice president of F/A-18 and EA Programmes, Boeing, said “ a platform like the “Super Hornet” under the Make in India programme will help the Indian industry to position itself for the manufacture of Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA).” “Boeing can provide the capability needed for the Indian Navy to build its next generation carrier air wing. It can also provide the industrial base right here behind that capability,” Gillian said. “When we look across the globe at quality, capability and cost – India is an obvious partner. We have been building F/A-18 aero structures and assemblies in India because it makes good business sense to do so.”

Boeing is one of the four vendors which have responded to India Navy’s Multi-role carrier-borne fighters (MRCBF) Tender to Supply 57 carrier-borne fighter jets to equip its aircraft carriers. The company’s top executive said that Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet is the most advanced tactical fighter, an ideal fit for Indian Navy next gen carriers, adding that Indian Navy needs aircraft to operate off carriers that are networked & survivable with growth potential and Boeing F/A-18 is the best fit. Gillian also said that Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet is an evolving platform which will outpace future threats and will be on US Navy carriers into the 2040s [emphasis added--that is current USN plan http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/why-boeings-block-iii-f-18e-f-super-hornet-about-become-21282 ]. The company officials also made a pitch for Scan Eagle unmanned air systems (UAS) which already has been offered to Indian Navy.

The Indian Navy initiated the bid and issued a Request for Information (RfI) for Procurement of Multi-Role Carrier Borne Fighter for The Indian Navy earlier this year.  “The Analytical and (computer) simulations have shown that the F/A-18 is compatible with the current carrier fleet of the Indian Navy. The results of the test have been submitted in response to a global RFI issued by the Navy,” said Pratyush Kumar, president, Boeing India. Responding to queries, Kumar said that the aircraft comes with an overall life cycle cost which is more reasonable than other contenders in the bid. “The overall life cycle cost is far lower than others,” Kumar said. “The Super Hornet has the lowest cost per flight hour which is even lower than Lockheed Martin’s F-16.”..
http://www.financialexpress.com/industry/us-boeing-fa-18-super-hornet-offered-under-made-in-india-initiative-will-indian-navy-get-this-jet/830349/

More:

Quote
...
Currently the Super Hornet, Rafale, Gripen, and MiG-29K are in the running. Even the F-35B and F-35C could be possible contenders, but at this time it is unclear if the Joint Strike Fighter will be formally offered. Only the Rafale and Super Hornet are CATOBAR capable today. The MiG-29K would be upgraded for catapult launch capabilities and may port over some technology from the latest MiG-35 Fulcrum variant. Gripen-E would have to be navalized completely, but the SAAB has closely studied doing this under the Sea Gripen concept for years. Also, the Gripen is single engine and it seems like the Indian Navy is interested in a twin engine design, but still, Gripen is a hardy and efficient combat jet and has a lot to offer the Indian Navy...
http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/13883/boeing-says-super-hornet-fully-compatible-with-indian-navy-ski-jump-carriers

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« Last Edit: August 29, 2017, 15:44:31 by MarkOttawa »
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Offline whiskey601

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #326 on: August 29, 2017, 22:43:20 »
I have 2 questions...
If the Sea Gripen is potentially a "contender" because the Gripen is a "hardy" aircraft, but also potentially out because it only has a single engine (and currently is only a design idea), how is the F35 only a potential contender? (perhaps because it will never be built in India?)
If Boeing is willing to discuss the Super Hornet as a made in India solution for only 57 aircraft, is there a similar offer from Boeing to build "at least" 88 in Canada??
 

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #327 on: September 09, 2017, 15:15:16 »
Asian military cockpit--growing Delhi/Tokyo axis (with US support) vs Beijing section, note amphibious SAR aircraft US-2, maritime patrol and ASW:

Quote
India, Japan to step up defence cooperation

India and Japan have agreed to collaborate closely in defence production, including on dual-use technologies, as the two countries resolved to ramp up overall military engagement under the bilateral special strategic framework.

Defence Minister Arun Jaitley and his Japanese counterpart Itsunori Onodera yesterday held wide-ranging talks, as part of the India-Japan annual defence ministerial dialogue in Tokyo during which issues relating to the US-2 amphibious aircraft also figured [emphasis added], a joint press statement said.

The decision by India and Japan to boost defence ties comes amid escalating tension in the region in the wake of the nuclear test by North Korea and China’s growing assertiveness in the South China Sea.

The two sides also agreed to commence technical discussions for research collaboration in the areas of Unmanned Ground Vehicles and Robotics.

India plans to buy the US-2 ShinMaywa aircraft from Japan for its navy. Last year, China had reacted angrily to reports that Japan plans to sell weapons to India at cheaper prices, saying that such a move is disgraceful [emphasis added].

The two sides also agreed to ramp up counter-terror cooperation, besides deepening engagement among navies, air forces and ground forces of the two countries.

“The Ministers exchanged views and ideas with the aim to further strengthen defence and security cooperation under the framework of the ‘Japan-lndia Special Strategic and Global Partnership’,” the statement said today.

It said Jaitley and Onodera deliberated on the current security situation in the Indo-Pacific region and condemned in the strongest terms North Korea’s latest nuclear test and called upon the country to cease such action which adversely impacts peace and stability of the region and beyond.

Reviewing bilateral defence ties, they commended the progress made in discussions to identify specific areas of collaboration in the field of defence equipment and technology cooperation for production of various military platforms.

They noted the effort made by both countries regarding the cooperation on US-2 amphibious aircraft [emphasis added],” said the statement.

The ministers endorsed the importance of enhancing interaction between governments and defence industries of the two countries to encourage collaboration, including for defence and dual-use technologies.

In the meeting, Jaitley briefed about India’s policy reforms in the defence manufacturing sectors, saying the country offers huge opportunities for foreign industries to play an active role.

Seeking to further intensify naval cooperation, Onodera expressed his intention to have state-of-the-art Japanese assets, including P-1 maritime patrol aircraft to participate in next year’s trilateral Malabar naval exercise which also involves the US Navy.

“The two sides will consider inclusion of Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) training to expand cooperation. In addition the ministers agreed to pursue exchanges and training by ASW aviation units such as P-3C
[emphasis added],” the statement said. P-3C is an anti-submarine and maritime surveillance aircraft.

The Japanese side proposed to invite Indian Navy personnel to mine-countermeasures training held by it.

Jaitley attended the dialogue with Japan as defence minister though Nirmala Sitharaman was given the defence portfolio in the cabinet reshuffle on Sunday. Jaitley had said there were logistical constraints for her to attend the dialogue.

At the talks, the two sides also welcomed the constructive engagement between Japan’s Acquisition, Technology and Logistic Agency (ATLA) and India’s Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO).

The defence and security cooperation between India and Japan is on an upswing and both countries are exploring ways to further deepen it.

Prime Minister Modi had visited Japan in November last year during which both sides had decided to ramp up bilateral defence and security cooperation.
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/policy/india-japan-to-step-up-defence-cooperation/article9848184.ece#

Shinmaywa US-2 (might India, er, weaponize?):
http://www.naval-technology.com/projects/shinmaywa-us-2-stol-search-and-rescue-amphibian/


From 2015:

Quote
Maybe a Bit of a Delhi-Tokyo Axis After All, Part 2
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2015/03/31/mark-collins-maybe-a-bit-of-a-delhi-tokyo-axis-after-all-part-2/

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« Last Edit: September 09, 2017, 15:34:56 by MarkOttawa »
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #328 on: September 20, 2017, 12:27:10 »
Big problem for Boeing to build Super Hornets in India for navy, Lockheed to build F-16V for air force:

Quote
Exclusive: U.S. defense firms want control over tech in Make-in-India plan

U.S. defense firms offering to set up production lines in India to win deals worth billions of dollars want stronger assurances they won’t have to part with proprietary technology, according to a business lobby group’s letter to India’s defense minister.

These companies are also saying they shouldn’t be held liable for defects in products manufactured in collaboration with local partners under Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Make-in-India’s drive to build a military industrial base.

Lockheed Martin (LMT.N) and Boeing (BA.N) are both bidding to supply combat jets to India’s military, which is running short of hundreds of aircraft as it retires Soviet-era MiG planes, and its own three-decade long effort to produce a domestic jet is hobbled by delays.

Lockheed has offered to shift its F-16 production line to India from Fort Worth, Texas, and make it the sole factory worldwide if India orders at least 100 single-engine fighters.

The U.S. firm has picked Tata Advanced Systems as its local partner under the defense ministry’s new Strategic Partnership model under which foreign original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) can hold up to a 49 percent stake in a joint venture with an Indian private firm which will hold the majority of shares.

The US-India Business Council (USIBC) wrote to India’s defense minister last month seeking a guarantee that U.S. firms would retain control over sensitive technology - even as joint venture junior partners.

“Control of proprietary technologies is a major consideration for all companies exploring public and private defense partnerships,” the business lobby, which represents 400 firms, said in the Aug. 3 letter, reviewed by Reuters and previously unreported.

“To allow foreign OEMs to provide the most advanced technologies, the partnership arrangement between an Indian owned ‘strategic partner’ company and a foreign OEM needs to provide an opportunity for the foreign OEM to retain control over its proprietary technology,” it said, noting this wasn’t explicit in the policy document.

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Technology transfer is at the heart of Modi’s drive to build a domestic industrial base and cut a reliance on imports that has made India the world’s biggest arms importer in recent years.

Without full tech transfer in previous arms deals, India’s mainly state-run defense factories have largely been left to assemble knock-down kits even for tanks and aircraft produced under license from the foreign maker.

Modi’s advisers have vowed to change that...

Lockheed did not respond to a request for comment. Boeing, which is bidding for a separate contract to sell its F/A-18 Super Hornets for India’s aircraft carrier fleet, declined to comment on the USIBC letter. But the company’s India president, Pratyush Kumar, told a conference this month there were concerns about Indian private firms’ lack of experience in the aerospace sector...
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-india-defence-exclusive/exclusive-u-s-defense-firms-want-control-over-tech-in-make-in-india-plan-idUSKCN1BU15O

Trump might have concerns too--in MAGA, not MIGA, business.

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #329 on: October 23, 2017, 16:01:27 »
Thirty-six more Rafales for air force?  Plus sub competition:

Quote
Eyeing more sale of Rafales, French defence minister Florence Parley heads to India next week

French defence minister Florence Parley will be here next week to lay the groundwork to further boost the bilateral strategic partnership ahead of President Emmanuel Macron's visit to India in December.

France is very keen to hard-sell additional Rafale fighters to India after the IAF inducts the 36 jets being acquired under the Rs 59,000 crore (7.87 billion) megadeal inked in September last year.

The IAF has itself projected the operational need to go in for another 36 Rafales after the first 36 are inducted at the Hasimara (West Bengal) and Ambala (Haryana) airbases from November 2019 to mid-2022, as was earlier reported by TOI...

France, of course, is also one of the four remaining contenders for Project-75 (India), under which six advanced stealth submarines are to be built here through a collaboration between a foreign ship-builder and an Indian shipyard for an estimated Rs 70,000 crore ($10.9 billion).
https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/defence/eyeing-more-sale-of-rafales-french-defence-minister-florence-parley-heads-to-india-next-week/articleshow/61169845.cms

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #330 on: October 23, 2017, 16:32:06 »
That's $11.5B CAD for 36 aircraft. Cost of a first world airforce is expensive.

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #331 on: October 23, 2017, 20:59:44 »
That is a lower price per unit than the Hornet we have been offered.

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #332 on: October 23, 2017, 21:11:13 »
YZT580:

Quote
That is a lower price per unit than the Hornet we have been offered.

True but all depends on what is included in the deal beyond the URF  price.

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #333 on: November 02, 2017, 14:56:23 »
Saab sweetening Gripen E pot (how tech might LockMart be allowed to transfer?):

Quote
Saab plans Gripen ecosystem in India

Saab and its Indian partner Adani held an event in New Delhi on 31 October, intended to build industrial alliances in support of the Swedish group’s bid to supply its Gripen E combat aircraft to the Indian Air Force (IAF).

Saab said that the ‘Gripen-India partnership summit’ was geared towards “creating an industrial ecosystem to develop and produce [the] Gripen in India”. Saab has offered the aircraft to meet the IAF’s single-engine fighter requirement.

The deal is framed around a localised production requirement, and could be worth about USD12 billion as the IAF seeks to procure up to 150 aircraft to replace its ageing Russian MiG-21 and MiG-27 fighter aircraft.

To support its localised production proposal, Saab said the summit brought together international Gripen partners – including Honeywell, Leonardo, Harris, and Cobham – and more than 100 Indian suppliers that “Saab and Adani believe can add value to the offering for India”.

Saab added, “This is to start shaping an eco-system for Gripen in India in preparation for the single-engine fighter selection process.”

The summit was held just two months after Saab and Adani announced their partnership to jointly bid for the IAF’s single-engine fighter requirement.

Saab said that it would endeavour to transfer design and manufacturing capabilities to Adani under the collaboration, with the goal of enabling the production of systems in India and promoting general development of the country’s defence industry.

Upon announcing the partnership with Adani, Saab’s president and CEO Håkan Buskhe said, “We are committed to the India-Sweden relationship, and in bringing the latest technology and skills to India. Our plans in India are to create a new defence ecosystem that would involve many partners, vendors, and suppliers. To achieve this, we need a strong Indian partner who can help create the framework for the infrastructure and eco-system to come into place.”


http://www.janes.com/article/75370/saab-plans-gripen-ecosystem-in-india

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #334 on: November 02, 2017, 16:53:02 »
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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #335 on: November 07, 2017, 13:04:52 »
Was pretty sure there'd be this sort of problem with "Make-in-India":

Quote
$10-billion fighter deal hits tech-transfer air pocket

 India’s $10-billion single-engine fighter jet deal is believed to have hit a stumbling block over the contentious issue of transfer of technology (ToT) and equity participation. This is while negotiations are on for the purchase of more Rafale jets from France.

The two main contenders for the deal — Lockheed Martin and SAAB — have made it clear to the Defence Ministry that they will not go in for a complete transfer of technology (ToT) with 49 per cent equity participation in the joint ventures that they have inked with their respective Indian partners, sources told BusinessLine.

Under the defence foreign direct investment rules, global OEMs can invest more than 49 per cent with prior government approval. However, the fighter-jet deal has to be executed under the new ‘Strategic Partnership’ (SP) policy, and as per the norms laid out in this policy, it is the Indian entity that will have a controlling stake with 51 per cent.

The Defence Ministry is looking to acquire at least 100 of these jets for the Indian Air Force (IAF). While the US’ Lockheed Martin has offered the advanced F-16 Block 70, Swedish defence major SAAB has presented its single-engine multi-role Gripen E for the programme.

Lockheed Martin and SAAB have also joined hands with Tata Advance Defence Systems Ltd and the Adani Group, respectively, to design, develop and produce the warplanes in India under the ‘Make in India’ programme.

The issue of proprietary technology was also raised by US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson during his visit last month. He made it clear that ToT will come for a price.

The government is now looking at a follow-on order to buy more Rafale jets, which will be in addition to the 36 bought in September last year for $8.9 billion. The IAF is also keen on buying more of these warplanes, according to sources.

The decision to buy more Rafale jets from Dassault Aviation is likely to be announced during the visit of French President Emmanuel Macron in December, sources added.

However, the sources said, India has already informed the French that “not a single” Rafale will be bought in flyaway mode — they will be built in the Dhirubhai Ambani Aerospace Park, run by Reliance Aerospace Ltd and Dassault Aviation in the Mihan Special Economic Zone in Nagpur.

Dassault Aviation Chief Eric Trappier had recently said, in France, that the company is in talks with India for more orders.
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/10billion-fighter-deal-hits-techtransfer-air-pocket/article9945734.ece#

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #336 on: November 13, 2017, 16:08:17 »
India's "Act East" policy in action, with China in mind--but will not become full US "partner" or effectively an ally, prefers a more tous azimuts approach with Russia as a major balancer (note meeting was of diplomatic officials, not defence):

Quadrilateral Coalition on the Indo-Pacific

 With an eye on China’s activities in the region, India said that the first meeting of its officials with those from the US, Australia and Japan — described as the “quadrilateral” — agreed that a “free, open, prosperous and inclusive Indo-Pacific region serves the long-term interests of all countries in the region and of the world at large”.
https://www.marinelink.com/news/quadrilateral-indopacific431204?


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"Officials from India’s Ministry of External Affairs, Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs, Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and United State’s Department of State met in Manila on November 12, 2017 for consultations on issues of common interest in the Indo-Pacific region," said a government release.
 
The discussions focused on cooperation based on their converging vision and values for promotion of peace, stability and prosperity in an increasingly inter-connected region that they share with each other and with other partners.
 
They agreed that a free, open, prosperous and inclusive Indo-Pacific region serves the long-term interests of all countries in the region and of the world at large. The officials also exchanged views on addressing common challenges of terrorism and proliferation linkages impacting the region as well as on enhancing connectivity.
 
The quadrilateral partners committed to deepening cooperation, which rests on a foundation of shared democratic values and principles, and to continue discussions to further strengthen the rules-based order in the Indo-Pacific region.
 
The Indian side highlighted India’s Act East Policy as the cornerstone of its engagement in the Indo-Pacific region.
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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #337 on: December 15, 2017, 15:06:09 »
Progress on Indian Navy's "Make-n-India" SSK front:
Quote
INS Kalvari Commissioned into the Indian Navy

The Prime Minister of India,  Narendra Modi commissioned INS Kalvari (S-21), the first of the six Scorpene class submarines built under Project 75 (Kalvari Class) into the Indian Navy at an impressive ceremony held at Naval Dockyard, Mumbai on 14 December 2017.
 
The event marked the formal induction into the Navy of the first of the six submarines being constructed at Mazagon Docks Ltd., in collaboration with the French builder M/s Naval Group.
 
Upon arrival at Naval Dockyard, Mumbai, the Prime Minster was received by the Chief of the Naval Staff. The Prime Minster was presented a 100-man Guard of Honour and was introduced to the ship’s officers and other dignitaries present.
 
Congratulating the people of India on this occasion, the Prime Minister described INS Kalvari as a prime example of "Make in India." He commended all those involved in its manufacture. He described the submarine as an excellent illustration of the fast growing strategic partnership between India and France. He said the INS Kalvari will add even more strength to the Indian Navy.
 
The Prime Minister said that the 21st century is described as Asia's century. He added that it is also certain that the road to development in the 21st century goes through the Indian Ocean. That is why the Indian Ocean has a special place in the policies of the Government, he added. The Prime Minister said this vision can be understood through the acronym SAGAR - Security and Growth for All in the Region.
 
The Prime Minister said India is fully alert with regard to its global, strategic and economic interests in the Indian Ocean. He said that is why the modern and multi-dimensional Indian Navy plays a leading role in promoting peace and stability in the region.
 
He said India believes that the world is one family, and is fulfilling its global responsibilities. India has played the role of "first responder" for its partner countries, in times of crises, he added.
 
Congratulating the MDL for restarting the production line of submarines once again, Mrs Nirmala Sitharaman, the Raksha Mantri thanked the Yard workers, who she said “mattered high on this day”.
 
The process of submarine construction has again been started in the country and it should not stop, the Raksha Mantri said. She emphasized the need to avoid episodic starts and stops in the industry and maintain a pool of skills needed to build high technology platforms within the country, sustenance of which would lead to a virtuous cycle of betterment for Indian industry, retention of skills and better peace dividends to the nation.
 
INS Kalvari is manned by a team comprising 08 officers and 35 sailors with Captain SD Mehendale at the helm as her first Commanding Officer. The commissioning will augment the offensive capability of the Indian Navy, and the Western Naval Command in particular.
https://www.marinelink.com/news/commissioned-kalvari432147

More on Naval Group's (formerly DCNS--French company's name now in English!) Scorpene class, lots of success world-wide:
http://www.naval-technology.com/projects/scorpene/

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #338 on: December 20, 2017, 17:22:41 »
Looks like PM Modi's "Make-in-India" policy will stick air force with more HAL Tejas:

Quote
India launches $8 billion program for light combat aircraft

India formally launched a program Wednesday to buy a fleet of 83 single-engine fighters for about $8 billion.

The light combat aircraft, dubbed the LCA Mark-1A, will be produced by state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd on nomination. This is the largest Make in India defense program and the first effort to build fighters in the country without obtaining technology transfer from overseas, a Ministry of Defence official said.

The purchase of an adapted version of the LCA Mark-1 comes amid skepticism about a another effort to purchase of 105 Mark 2 versions of futuristic, homemade light-combat aircraft for $15 billion. Service officials and analysts have said that program lacks clarity...
https://www.defensenews.com/air/2017/12/20/india-launches-8-billion-program-for-light-combat-aircraft/


A pair of Tejas - Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) take off during a display on the second day of the Aero India exhibition at Yelahanka Air Force Station in Bangalore on February 15, 2017. (Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

So no F-16Vs or GripenEs?  Paks and Chinese should be relieved.

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #339 on: February 07, 2018, 12:37:16 »
More on new fighters for Indian navy (and air force:

1) Boeing in Talks With Indian Navy to Sell F/A-18 Fighter Jets

Quote
Boeing Co. is in talks with the Indian Navy to sell its F/A-18 Hornet fighter jets in a bid to gain a bigger share of the defense market in the South Asian country, the world’s biggest arms importer.

A lot of technical evaluation has yet to take place, Gene Cunningham, Boeing’s vice president for defense, space and security, told reporters at the Singapore Airshow. The company is also seeing opportunities for its KC-46 multirole tanker in India and other countries, Cunningham said.

India’s navy last year invited proposals for 57 jets for its aircraft carriers, while its air force is seeking at least 100 planes. Boeing and Saab AB have said both the orders should be combined, which would make it the world’s biggest fighter jet order in play [emphasis added].

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who plans to spend $250 billion in the coming years on defense equipment from fighter jets to guns and helmets, wants India and local companies to get a share of the deals it enters into by calling on foreign manufacturers to make products locally. Boeing, Lockheed Martin Corp. and others have said they will produce in India if they win contracts large enough to make investments worthwhile...
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-05/boeing-in-talks-with-indian-navy-to-sell-f-a-18-fighter-jets

2) SINGAPORE: Saab responds to India Navy RFP with Sea Gripen [hasn't flown]

Quote
Saab has responded to an Indian navy request for proposals for carrier-borne fighter aircraft with an offer based on a marinised variant of its Gripen NG.

The navy is reported to require up to 57 multi-role combat aircraft that would replace its current fleet of Sukhoi Su-30s.

No details on the timeline for any acquisition have been released, with Saab officials indicating that they are unsure of when any decision would be made by New Delhi.

Saab says it is open to technology transfer as part of any Gripen deal [emphasis added]. The Swedish manufacturer has previously partnered with Embraer to work on the Gripen E/Fs ordered by Brazil.

The Swedish manufacturer says the Sea Gripen will have all the capabilities of the Gripen E/F as well as a "small logistic footprint".

Meanwhile, Saab says it is confident of acquiring more operators for the GE Aviation F414-powered fighter in the Asia-Pacific, revealing that it is in talks with "prospects" including Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines...
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/singapore-saab-responds-to-india-navy-rfp-with-sea-445649/

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Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #340 on: February 07, 2018, 13:11:01 »
Well, whoopdidoo!

F/A-18 E/F would be for the Indian carrier force. However, the INS Vikrant, which was laid down in 2009 but has yet to enter service (sea trials expected starting possibly in 2019 if nothing more goes wrong! And commissioning somewhere in the 2021-23 timeframe) is a STOBAR carrier and cannot operate F-18's.

Those airplanes would be for the yet to even be started INS Vishal. President Trump's clearing India to receive demonstration and potential acquisition of EMALS launchers (even though he thinks they are crap and wants them removed from US carrier(s) and go back to steam) for the Vishal cleared the way for a potential CATOBAR carrier. However, the Vishal is now not expected to arrive before some time in 20230's. Will F-18's even be around by then?
 

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #341 on: February 09, 2018, 18:59:54 »
Interesting social changes going on in India, as more and more people are adopting English as their primary language at home. The idea of a globe spanning Anglosphere becomes stronger, especially as these people become a larger and more influential demographic in India (they already represent an affluent and influential section of the population). Interesting article at link:

https://scroll.in/magazine/867130/indo-anglians-the-newest-and-fastest-growing-caste-in-india

Quote
Indo-Anglians: The newest and fastest-growing caste in India
An influential demographic or psychographic is emerging in India  – and it is  affluent, urban and highly educated.

Indo-Anglians: The newest and fastest-growing caste in India
Feb 02, 2018 · 11:30 am
Sajith Pai
 
Sometime around 2012 or 2013, my daughters stopped speaking in Konkani, our mother tongue. It isn’t entirely clear what provoked it. Perhaps it was a teacher at their Mumbai school encouraging students to speak more English at home. Or perhaps it was something else. It didn’t matter. What did matter was that our home became an almost exclusively English-speaking household, with the occasional Konkani conversation.

We were not alone. Clustered throughout the affluent sections of urban India are many families such as ours, predominantly speaking English and not the tongues they grew up with.

Some of these families, or at least parents in these English-speaking households, do make an attempt to speak their mother tongue as much as they speak in English. But even in these bilingual households, English still dominates. It takes an effort for the kids to speak in the Indian tongues, beyond a few simple phrases. English, on the other hand, comes naturally to them; the larger vocabulary they possess in English helping them express complex thoughts and propositions far easily.

I have been looking for a term, an acronym or a phrase that describes these families who speak English predominantly at home. These constitute an influential demographic, or rather a psychographic, in India  –  affluent, urban, highly educated, usually in intercaste or inter-religious unions. I propose to call them Indo-Anglians.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #342 on: February 15, 2018, 15:05:34 »
This could take while--and US would have well-justified security concerns about F-35s in India:

Quote
Indian Air Force requests [briefing on] F-35A fighter aircraft

The Indian Air Force (IAF) is requesting a classified briefing on the F-35A Lightning II fighter aircraft, the Business Standard reports on 15 February.

Business Standard learns the IAF top brass is formally requesting for a classified briefing by the F-35’s prime builder, Lockheed Martin, on the capabilities of the sophisticated, fifth-generation fighter developed under the US Joint Strike Fighter programme.

The local source reported that IAF looks to procure a “next-generation fighter aircraft” to replace its MiG-27 and MiG-29 combat aircraft. It is expected that the IAF plans to order 126 new fighters that incorporate “conventional take-off and landing”...
http://defence-blog.com/news/indian-air-force-requests-f-35a-fighter-aircraft.html

And what about Su-57?  Which India has been working with Russia on.

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #343 on: February 22, 2018, 13:34:19 »
CHARLIE FOXTROT to the max, eh?  Excerpts:

Quote
Glavin: Justin Trudeau's trip to India could hardly be going worse

...nobody seems quite sure why Trudeau is travelling around India with his wife and his children and an entourage of cabinet ministers and MPs and various officials and a celebrity chef from Vancouver.

It has struck the BBC’s Ayeshea Perera that the point of it “appears to be a series of photo ops cunningly designed to showcase his family’s elaborate traditional wardrobe.” There sure doesn’t seem to be much business to attend to. A half-day here, a meeting there, perhaps a whole day all told out of an eight-day state visit set aside for what you might call state business.

Straight away, the tone was just weird.

There he was with his wife Sophie Gregoire and their children, Ella Grace, Xavier and Hadrien, at one mood-setting location after another, posing. And in elaborate costume. Different location shoot, a different costume. Oh look, here they are at the Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad. And now they’re at the Mathura Wildlife Sanctuary, with the elephants Maya, Bijlee and Lakshmi!

The Taj Mahal, the Jama Masjid, and then Mumbai, with movie stars. Hey, who’s that posing for a photograph with Sophie Gregoire? Oh my goodness it’s convicted Khalistani would-be assassin Jaspal Singh Atwal, the triggerman in the attempted murder of Punjab cabinet minister Malkiat Singh Sidhu on a backroad on Vancouver Island in 1986, when Sidhu was in Canada to attend a nephew’s wedding.

And oh, look, there he is again, in another photo, posing with Edmonton member of Parliament and Infrastructure Minister Amarjeet Sohi.

Crikey, this is awkward. Trudeau and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan had just managed to finagle a meeting with the notoriously paranoid Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh, a military man who had made a name for himself in Canada by accusing Canada’s Sikh MPs and cabinet ministers of Khalistani terrorist sympathies. The meeting had gone well. Everything seemed to be going swimmingly. Bygones, bygones. And then Atwal shows up.

The posed photos were one thing. But what do you know, in Atwal’s possession was an embossed invitation from the Canadian High Commission to attend a dinner with Trudeau and his ministers and all the other bigshots, in Delhi, on Thursday night.

Great. Just great.

It is worth keeping in mind that Trudeau didn’t have much else to do in India that was more important than disabusing everyone of the misapprehension that Canada was becoming a safe haven for Khalistani whackjobs again. Trudeau’s one big job was to convince Singh and Prime Minister Narendra Modi and everyone in between that Canada’s Liberal government was not backsliding to the ethnic-bloc politics of the 1980s.

Apart from posing for photos and sightseeing and attending a few meetings, the only thing Trudeau really needed to do was persuade India that despite appearances, Canada wasn’t returning to the days when Liberal politicians were happily oblivious to the theocratic-fascist Khalistani movement, which wants an independent Sikh homeland, had set itself up in Canada, with its dreams of carving out a Sikh state from the Indian portion of ancient Punjab, and its “government in exile” in Vancouver...

Two years ago, the Khalsa Darbar gurudwara in Mississauga decided that the temple would be forthwith off limits to Indian diplomats. The pretext was some row involving the visit of a diplomat accompanied by an RCMP security detail. The diplomat-barring quickly became a diplomat boycott involving 14 Sikh temples in Ontario. Within months, the boycott had spread to Sikh temples across the United States, Britain and Australia.

At the conclusion of his meeting with Trudeau and Sajjan, Chief Minister Singh gave them both a list of nine Canadians alleged to be involved in terrorist activities and “hate crimes” inspired by militant Khalistani politics.

The list almost certainly contains the same names that Indian officials had already passed on to the Canadian High Commission. The individuals, from Vancouver, Surrey, Brampton and Toronto, whose whereabouts are unknown, are alleged to be fundraisers and gunrunners for Khalistani terrorists. The men are associated with the Khalistan Zindabad Force, listed as a terrorist entity by the European Union, the Khalistan Liberation Force, a Pakistan-based group that has carried out a series of assassinations in Punjab over the past two years, and Babbar Khalsa International, listed as a terrorist entity in Canada [emphasis added]...


In this handout photo released by the Amritsar District Public Relations Officer on Feb.21, 2018,  Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (R), along with his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau (L), daughter Ella-Grace (2nd L) and son Xavier (2nd R) pose for a family photo as they pay their respects at the Sikh Golden Temple. HANDOUT / AFP/Getty Images


In this photograph released by the Amritsar District Public Relations Officer on February 21, 2018, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (L) meets with Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh in Amritsar. HANDOUT / AFP/Getty Images
http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/glavin-justin-trudeaus-trip-to-india-could-hardly-be-going-worse

Mark
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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #344 on: February 23, 2018, 09:04:44 »
Prime Minister Trudeau, himself, but more directly his team, the PMO ~ Butts, Purchase, Telford et al ~ have failed, massively on both the domestic political and international/diplomatic level.

Canada has, since 1948, had something of a special relationship with India ... St Laurent and Pearson and Nehru and Krishna Menon were famous for their cooperation and close consultation in trying to defuze the cold war. St Laurent and Pearson persuaded Truman and Atcheson and Eisenhower and Dulles to accept Menon's "non-aligned" movement and to be extra patient while India developed, slowly one must admit, into the world's greatest democracy. Given what I saw of Prime Minister Modi's remarks at his joint press conference with Prime Minister Trudeau, it appears that Canada was sent home with an ever so polite warning to stop associating with Sikh separatists ... I didn't detect a shred of goodwill in Modi's welcoming tweet (sent five days after Trudeau arrived) or in his remarks to Trudeau. Canada is just a small country that came to look for access to India's huge and growing market and was sent away, empty handed.

The prime minister emerged as a bit of a global laughing stock for his "Mr Dressup" routine, but the Atwat affair raised serious questions about the honesty of his pledge to Punjab leader Amarinder Singh that Canada supported Indian national unity. Trudeau's attendance at a Khalsa Day parade in Toronto in April 2017 is what lies behind his strained relations with India. While people like Jason Kenney took pains to distance Canada from Sikh extremists, Trudeau blundered into their trap and India, at the highest levels, was shocked and offended.

The Trudeau plan, to use this trip as a source of photos for the 2019 campaign also backfired ... those pictures will get used, I think, but mostly in Conservative campaign adds mocking the PM for insulting India and being ridiculed by the world.

The Indians are also worried about Trudeau's seemingly single minded quest for a free trade deal with China. Now, let me be clear, I favour a free(er) trade deal with China ... I favour free(er) trade with everyone. But China is not the only market that matters and, anyway, Xi Jinping sent Trudeau packing without a hoped for deal because he (Trudeau) was a bit too "uppity." And that came after Trudeau managed to offend Australia, Japan and the Philippines on one short trip.

India is emerging as a major global power ... in 25 years it may rival China. Canada needs good relations with India. Team Trudeau has failed, miserably, at achieving an important, strategic goal. It will take years, and I suspect, a new government, to set things right
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline whiskey601

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #345 on: February 23, 2018, 15:26:52 »
ERC, do you think Canada could likely also do just as well without having anything to do with India, period?  I've been there, worked there, wouldn't want to do it again.  China is not so bad, really.

Is it possible that Trudeau went there for so long because he is running away from the issues at home, does it appear that he and his inner circle lack the competence to deal with substantially in manner that is in the best interests of the entire population.  Perhaps, to make it worthwhile, he have spoken with the government in India* about their experiences with legal use of cannabis over the post 4000 years, the "trip" (no pun intended) might have productive and the local garb more appropriate.   

The controversies about India are a heaven sent diversion for Trudeau helping him to avoid serious domestic governance.     
Agreed on all the rest though.   

* for an uncanny resemblance to the current Canadian government see the Wikipedia entry on the 1893 Indian Hemp Drugs Commission and the "... The report the Commission produced was at least 3,281 pages long, with testimony from almost 1,200 "doctors, coolies, yogis, fakirs, heads of lunatic asylums, bhang peasants, tax gatherers, smugglers, army officers, hemp dealers, ganja palace operators and the clergy."  Except for the clergy part, replace that with a 4 or 5 letter acronym or something with a #.   :o

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #346 on: February 23, 2018, 15:38:39 »
India might almost make RCAF new fighter procurement look good (further links at orginal):

Quote
India Upends Its Single-Engine Fighter Competition and Will Also Consider Twin-Engine Jets
Lockheed Martin led the existing competition with its F-16IN Viper, but will now likely face Boeing's F/A-18 Super Hornet and France's Rafale.

ndia has reportedly halted its plans to purchase nearly 115 single-engine fighter jets in order to reassess its requirements and open the tender up to twin-engine designs. The decision will delay purchases of any aircraft for at least two more years and will have significant ramifications for Lockheed Martin, which increasingly appeared to be the favorite with its F-16IN Viper under the existing terms, as well the Indian Air Force.

On Feb. 23, 2018, The Times of India first revealed the new course of action, citing anonymous sources, which Indian online outlet DefenseNews.in also reported afterwards. The competition, which could have been worth up $18 billion, has already been going on since 2016 with Lockheed Martin’s F-16IN, an advanced India-specific version of the company’s F-16 Block 70, and Saab’s Gripen-E being the only two contenders. This tender followed another failed deal to purchase new fighters that had collapsed the year before.

“The original plan placed an unnecessary restriction on only single-engine fighters, which limited the competition to just two jets [the F-16IN and Gripen-E],” an unnamed individual told The Times. “The aim is to increase the contenders and avoid needless allegations later.”

Exactly what potential allegations this individual might have been referring to is unclear. But India has struggled to procure new fighter jets over the past two decades and Indian authorities are undoubtedly keen to avoid a repeat of the failed Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft competition, also known as the MMCRA or MCRA.

That tender, which could have been worth approximately $20 billion and formally began in 2007, had been open to all fighter jet designs, regardless of engine configuration. India picked France’s Dassault Rafale, a twin-engine fighter, as the winner, but the actual contract quickly became mired in disputes over local production or assembly of the planes and India finally backed out completely in 2015.   

Reopening the tender to twin-engine fighters will almost certainly mean that many of the former MMRCA contenders will submit new offers. The most likely entrants will be American manufacturer Boeing with its F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, the Rafale, the Eurofighter Typhoon, and one or more Russian aircraft, such as the MiG-35 Fulcrum or Su-35 Flanker-E.

Broadening the competition would definitely make a certain amount of sense. After protracted negotiations, India is on track to acquire 36 Rafales for the country’s Air Force as part of limited, interim purchase. The first of those fighters are supposed to arrive some time in 2019, but the deal remains mired in controversy.

The Indian Navy is also in the market for new jets to embark on its upcoming fleet of new aircraft carriers. Super Hornet, Rafale, the MiG-29K, all twin-engine designs, as well as a single-engine navalized Gripen-E known as Sea Gripen, are presently competing for that contract.

In 2016, the service rejected a proposal to purchase a carrier-borne version of the notoriously under-performing indigenously developed Tejas fighter jet. It is also reportedly increasingly unhappy with the performance of its existing Russian-made MiG-29Ks.

Having Air Force and Navy units flying the same aircraft, or similar variants with a high commonality between airframe components and mission systems, could help reduce logistics and other sustainment costs. It could potentially help offset any higher costs associated with operating a twin-engine versus a single engine design, as well.

Boeing and Dassault seem most poised to benefit from the changes to the competition's requirements. As noted already, India is already in talks to buy dozens of Rafales and the navalized version of aircraft has a well established service record of carrier operations with the French Navy...

This rebooted competition could upend the partnerships that both Lockheed Martin and Saab had announced with local firms as part of their bids for the existing contract. In June 2017, Lockheed Martin had announced a particularly attractive arrangement with Indian industrial consortium Tata, stating that if its F-16IN won it would establish a shared production line in the country to make the jets for the Indian Air Force and use that assembly line to build additional aircraft for export elsewhere [emphasis added]. It was also considering working with Tata to build F-16 components even if the contract fell through, though.

But whatever happens and whatever benefits there are to be had from reframing the competition, the Indian Air Force is unlikely to be thrilled at the prospect of having to wait at least two more years for the jets. The service first identified a requirement for nearly 130 modern fighters in 2001 [emphasis added]...
http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/18733/india-upends-its-single-engine-fighter-competition-and-will-also-consider-twin-engine-jets

Mark
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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #347 on: February 23, 2018, 15:56:55 »
ERC, do you think Canada could likely also do just as well without having anything to do with India, period?  I've been there, worked there, wouldn't want to do it again.  China is not so bad, really.

Is it possible that Trudeau went there for so long because he is running away from the issues at home, does it appear that he and his inner circle lack the competence to deal with substantially in manner that is in the best interests of the entire population.  Perhaps, to make it worthwhile, he have spoken with the government in India* about their experiences with legal use of cannabis over the post 4000 years, the "trip" (no pun intended) might have productive and the local garb more appropriate.   

The controversies about India are a heaven sent diversion for Trudeau helping him to avoid serious domestic governance.     
Agreed on all the rest though.   

* for an uncanny resemblance to the current Canadian government see the Wikipedia entry on the 1893 Indian Hemp Drugs Commission and the "... The report the Commission produced was at least 3,281 pages long, with testimony from almost 1,200 "doctors, coolies, yogis, fakirs, heads of lunatic asylums, bhang peasants, tax gatherers, smugglers, army officers, hemp dealers, ganja palace operators and the clergy."  Except for the clergy part, replace that with a 4 or 5 letter acronym or something with a #.   :o

My take, worth exactly what I'm charging you in consultant fees  ::) , is that Xi Jinping is taking China in directions that may not be in Canada's better interests, and that even if we do ~ as I think we should ~ make a free(er) trade deal with China, we still want India as a counterbalance. In fact, I think everyone wants India to counterbalance China and I don't think anyone else, maybe not even the USA, can do that.

The worst thing, for everyone, is a failing India; so it is in our interests to do what (relatively little) we can to help India grow and prosper and remain a stable democratic bulwark against Chinese ambitions in Asia.

I'm also serious when I guess that India might match and even overtake China in a quester century ... China has to wrestle with some domestic, traditional demons, just as India does, but India has some advantages ~ institutions ~  that China still needs to discover, let alone build.

I take your points that China, today, looks a lot better than India ... I haven't been to India for a decade and when I was there I was dealing with some, relatively, elite people who shared pretty much all of our North American/Western European outlooks and values. I have, in these pages, talked about my admiration for the Chinese school system but I was blown away by what I saw in a couple of India's technical universities.

My  :2c:
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #348 on: March 01, 2018, 15:47:08 »
So Indian Air Force not looking at F-35A after all?

Quote
Not approached Lockheed Martin for buying US F-35 fighter jet: IAF chief BS Dhanoa
IAF Chief BS Dhanoa has said that no such request for procuring the American F-35 Lightning II aircraft has been made to the US.

The Indian Air Force (IAF) has categorically rejected reports that it has approached global US defence contractor Lockheed Martin for a classified briefing on F-35 Lightning II muti-role fighter jets.

Reacting to reports, IAF Chief BS Dhanoa said that no such request for procuring the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II aircraft has been made to the US.

''Americans have not been officially approached for a briefing on the F-35, ''IAF Chief Dhanoa was quoted as saying by the Indian Express.

The clarification from Dhanoa came at a time when IAF is already down to 31 squadrons of fighter aircraft against an authorisation of 42.

In view of IAF's fast depleting fleet, the Centre is expected to go for a government-to-government deal to get the next set of fighters.

However, any decision on buying the next set of fighter jets will be taken only after considering several factors like financial considerations, especially when budgetary provisions are limited for any big-ticket procurement by the Defence Ministry.

The report also quoted sources as saying that the proposal to buy and make a single-engine fighter was taken two years back on multiple considerations, including its cost [emphasis added]

Importantly, the cost of a single-engine fighter is significantly lower than that of a double-engine fighter like Rafale.

Also, the cost of operating a single-engine fighter is much less than that of a double-engine fighter.

An early decision in this regard would have certainly come as a big relief to the IAF and helped it build up its fighter strength, along with the induction of HAL-built indigenous Tejas fighter aircraft.

The government later decided to scrap the proposal for a single-engine fighter because it felt that it would result in a single-vendor situation, which would not be acceptable in the current political environment...
http://zeenews.india.com/india/no-formal-request-made-to-us-for-buying-f-35-fighter-jet-iaf-chief-bs-dhanoa-2085496.html

Indian procurement really has a rather Canadian ring to it, eh?

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Re: India (Superthread)
« Reply #349 on: March 15, 2018, 12:01:16 »
More on make-in-India Super Hornet in running for Indian Air Force fighter competition:

Quote
India eying Boeing's Super Hornet in latest twist to air force procurement

Boeing Co, considered the frontrunner in the race to supply the Indian navy with new fighter jets, is now in contention for a much bigger $15 billion order after the government abruptly asked the air force to consider the twin-engine planes.

Until recently, Lockheed Martin Corp’s F-16 and Saab AB’s Gripen were in a two-horse race supply at least 100 single-engine jets to build up the Indian Air Force’s fast-depleting combat fleet.

Both had offered to build the planes in India in collaboration with local companies as part of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s drive to build a domestic industrial base and cut back on arms imports.

But last month the government asked the air force to open up the competition to twin-engine aircraft and to evaluate Boeing’s F/A-18 Super Hornet, a defense ministry source said. That jet is a finalist for the Indian navy’s $8 billion to $9 billion contract for 57 fighters.

The defense ministry plans to within weeks issue a request for information (RFI), the first stage of a procurement process, for a fighter to be built in India. The competition will be open to both single and twin-engine jets, the official said, but both Lockheed and Saab said they had not been informed about the new requirements.

The latest change of heart is a major opportunity for Boeing, whose only foreign Super Hornet customer so far is the Royal Australian Air Force...

It also illustrates how dysfunctional the weapons procurement process and arms industry are in the world’s second-most-populous country [emphasis added]. The need for new fighters has been known for nearly 15 years, but after many announcements, twists and turns, the country’s air force has only three-quarters of the aircraft it needs...

France’s Dassault Systemes SE’s Rafale, the Eurofighter Typhoon and Russian aircraft are also potential contenders under the new requirements, the air force source and industry analysts said.

Admiral Harry Harris, the head of U.S. Pacific Command, told the U.S. House Armed Services Committee last month that India was considering the stealthy F-35, among other options. But the Indian air force said no request had been made to Lockheed for even a briefing on the aircraft[emphasis added]...
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-india-boeing-analysis/india-eying-boeings-super-hornet-in-latest-twist-to-air-force-procurement-idUSKCN1GR081

One wonders how the speed of this process will compare with the RCAF's fighter farce.

Mark
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