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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #275 on: March 15, 2017, 13:56:53 »
New Yasen-class SSNs--not SLCMs, possible threat to North America and worry for NORAD; seven in all to be built:

Quote
Russia's Most Powerful Nuclear Attack Submarine Ever Is Almost Ready for Sea

Russia is set to launch its second Yasen-class nuclear-powered attack submarine on March 30. Called Kazan, the new vessel is an upgraded Project 885M design that is in many ways much more capable than the lead ship of the class, K-560 Severodvinsk.

"Kazan is expected to be rolled out and put afloat on March 30," a Russian defense source told the Moscow-based TASS news agency.

The Russian Navy will take delivery of Kazan in 2018. Once the vessel is operational, she will be the most formidable enemy submarine that the U.S. Navy has ever faced. “It’s probably the most capable nuclear powered submarine out there fielded by a potential adversary,” Center for Naval Analyses Russian military affairs specialist Michael Kofman told The National Interest.

Indeed, Kazan is expected to be substantially improved over her older sister, the Severodvinsk...

“[Severodvinsk] is Russia’s first truly multipurpose submarine,” Michael Kofman and Norman Polmar wrote in the U.S. Naval Institute’s Proceedings journal. “The Severodvinsk is capable of antisubmarine, antiship, and land-attack missions. Among the more interesting features are a large bow sonar dome for the Irtysh-Amfora sonar system and an amidships battery of eight vertical-launch cells that can carry 32 Kalibr (SS-N-27/30 Sizzler) or Oniks (SS-N-26 Strobile) cruise missiles. These antiship and land-attack weapons are particularly significant after Russian surface ships and submarines fired long-range mis­siles into Syria in 2016 [emphasis added].”

Russia plans to build a total of seven Project 885M submarines—Novosibirsk, Krasnoyarsk, Arkhangelsk and Perm are currently under construction at the Sevmash shipyards on the White Sea port city of Severodvinsk...

Russia plans to build a total of seven Project 885M submarines—Novosibirsk, Krasnoyarsk, Arkhangelsk and Perm are currently under construction at the Sevmash shipyards on the White Sea port city of Severodvinsk...
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/russias-most-powerful-nuclear-attack-submarine-ever-almost-19775

Graphic of Severodvinsk:

Quote
Build Limited Missile Defenses Against Russian, Chinese Strikes: Experts
http://breakingdefense.com/2017/03/build-limited-missile-defenses-against-russian-chinese-strikes-experts/


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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #276 on: March 15, 2017, 17:04:19 »
Plus on SSBN Borei-class front:

Quote
Russia to Launch 1st Project 955A SSBN Submarine Knyaz Vladimir in August-September 2017

The Project 955A Borei-A class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine Knyaz Vladimir will be floated out in August or September 2017, a source in Russia’s defense industry told TASS.

"The fourth Borei-class submarine is planned to be put afloat in August or September 2017," the source said in reply to the relevant question.

The submarine Knyaz Vladimir was laid down in 2012. It will be the fourth out of eight Project 955 nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines and the first vessel built under improved project 955A. Russia’s Navy has already received three Project 955 submarines. The submarines Knyaz Oleg and Generalissimo Suvorov were laid down in 2014. The submarines Emperor Alexander III and Knyaz Pozharsky were laid down in 2015 and 2016, respectively. Each submarine carries 16 Bulava (NATO reporting name: SS-NX-32) intercontinental ballistic missiles.

A source in Russia’s defense industry told TASS earlier that the submarine Knyaz Vladimir would join the Navy in 2018 or one year later than planned.

The submarine was expected to be delivered to the Navy in 2017...
http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/defence-news/2017/march-2017-navy-naval-forces-defense-industry-technology-maritime-security-global-news/4988-russia-to-launch-1st-project-955a-ssbn-submarine-knyaz-vladimir-in-august-september-2017.html

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #277 on: March 15, 2017, 17:19:17 »
Did someone forget to tell the Russians that ASW is dead?   >:D
Philip II of Macedon to Spartans (346 BC):  "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city."

Reply:  "If."

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #278 on: March 15, 2017, 18:35:53 »
Did someone forget to tell the Russians that ASW is dead?   >:D

I think someone forgot to tell the GoC it isn't dead.  CASEX tomorrow! 
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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #279 on: March 18, 2017, 19:51:51 »
Article Link

Masters of the Arctic: Russia to Permanently Station Submarines in Icy North


Russian combat submarines have returned to the Arctic region, where they will increase their presence in the near future, Rear Admiral Viktor Kochemazov, the head of the combat training department of the Russian Navy, told the Russian newspaper Krasnaya Zvezda.

In an interview with the Russian newspaper Krasnaya Zvezda, Rear Admiral Viktor Kochemazov, the head of the combat training department of the Russian Navy, said that the next few years will see Russian battle submarines increasing their presence in the Arctic region.

Developing the Arctic Ocean basin is one of the main tasks set by the Russian Commander-in-Chief, a task that Kochemazov said will be resolved by stationing Russian submarines there on a permanent basis.

Kochemazov noted that after a long pause, the advanced Russian nuclear powered submarines have returned to the Arctic Ocean, including the Borey- and Yasen-class multipurpose ballistic missile submarines.

He recalled that the Kalibr missile systems were earlier successfully used against the terrorist group Daesh in Syria.

"I want to note that the development and testing of new types of weapons is underway; in this vein, we are not lagging behind the NATO countries, and in some respects we even surpass them," Kochemasov said.

Separately, he noted that in order to improve the professional training of submarine crews, competitions are regularly held among Russian Navy units, in what is expected to add significantly to the combat capability of the Russian submarines.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 19:57:45 by Eye In The Sky »
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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #280 on: April 27, 2017, 12:24:30 »
Ivan has lost a naval recce ship in a collision off the coast of Turkey.
Quote
Russian navy vessel sinks after collision off Turkey

Crew of both ships safe after crash near Bosphorus Strait

Thomson Reuters  Posted: Apr 27, 2017 8:02 AM ET| Last Updated: Apr 27, 2017 11:10 AM ET
A Russian reconnaissance ship sank after it collided with a Togo-flagged cargo vessel off the Turkish coast on Thursday, according to Turkey's coastal safety authority.

The Russian ship Liman and the other vessel, identified by authorities as Youzarsif H, collided in fog and low visibility in the Black Sea.

The Turkish coast guard said all 78 personnel aboard the Russian ship were rescued after it sent a tugboat and three fast rescue vessels to the area.

The freighter sustained minor damage — it is able to continue sailing — and all crew members are safe, according Turkey's transportation minister.

The ship was taking sheep from Romania to Jordan, according to Turkish broadcaster NTV.

Russia's defence ministry said the collision occurred about 40 kilometres northwest of the Bosphorus Strait.

The Bosphorus, which cuts through Istanbul, is one of the world's most important waterways for transit of oil and grains. The 27-kilometre waterway connects the Black Sea to the Mediterranean.
With files from The Associated Press and CBC News
© Thomson Reuters, 2017
Reuters

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/russian-ship-collision-1.4088014

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #281 on: August 04, 2017, 15:48:29 »
Aging sub woes (note cruise missiles re NORAD):

Quote
A Grim Future For Russia’s Nuclear Sub Fleet
The Kremlin can't replace its aging subs fast enough

In March 2017, Russia’s new Yasen-class nuclear attack submarine Kazan launched at the northern port city of Severodvinsk. Perhaps the quietest Russian submarine ever, the event was further evidence the Kremlin can still build capable and lethal subs capable of a variety of missions, including cruise-missile attack.

But it won’t be enough. The Russian navy — already badly depleted since the collapse of the Soviet Union — can’t quickly replace most of its existing nuclear submarine fleet, which is approaching the end of its collective lifespan. The outcome will likely mean a shrinking of the Russian nuclear submarine force in the years ahead.

By 2030, the bulk of Russia’s nuclear-powered attack and cruise-missile submarines will be in their mid-thirties at least — with some pushing into their forties. For perspective, the three oldest active American attack submarines, the Los Angeles-class USS Dallas, Bremerton and Jacksonville, are all 36 years old and waiting to be decommissioned during the next three years.

Submarines wear out in old age, particularly due to hull corrosion. Another serious concern is corrosion affecting components inside the nuclear reactor compartments, but data surrounding this subject are tightly guarded secrets among the world’s navies.

More to the point, naval vessels staying in service during old age require more maintenance and longer rest periods. Given that only around half of Russia’s submarine force — a charitable estimate — can be at sea at any given time, a force made up of mostly old boats will strain operational readiness.

The Kremlin’s relatively new multi-role Yasen class, of which two — the Severodvinsk and Kazan — launched in 2010 and 2017 respectively, cannot make up for the future retirements of Russia’s 11 Akulas, three Sierras, four Victor III attackers and eight Oscar II cruise missile subs, which are all getting long in the tooth.

The youngest Akula class, Gepard, entered service in 2000. Most date to the early 1990s.

The Yasen is a late-Soviet design with seven planned submarines, with the last one planned to enter service in 2023. This is again being generous given the Yasen class’ enormous expense, which is twice as high as one of Russia’s new ballistic missile subs.

While Russia could attempt to keep its Cold War-era subs going as long as possible, “given the obvious risk of rising costs, Russia will be able to have no more than 50 percent of the current number of nuclear submarines [by 2030],” the Russian military blog BMPD warned in a particularly grim assessment.

Russia’s ballistic missile submarines will be in somewhat better shape in 2030. Few countries possess “boomers” capable of dumping nuclear warheads into enemy cities — the United States, India, China, France, the United Kingdom and North Korea. Russia currently has 13, including three from the new Borey class, with up to five more on the way.

But by 2030, Russia’s three Delta III, six Delta IV-class boomers and its one Typhoon class will all be at least 40 years old if they remain in service. Nevertheless, even if Russia scrapped these boats and only relied on its newer Boreys, no country can likely match them in numbers except for the United States, China and possibly India...
http://warisboring.com/a-grim-future-for-russias-nuclear-submarine-fleet/

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #282 on: August 07, 2017, 14:04:53 »
Negative appreciation of state of Russian Navy:

Quote
Why Russia's Once Superpower Navy Is in Big Trouble

Over the past year, the Russian Navy has undertaken several high visibility operations, most notably the deployment of the aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov off the coast of Syria, and the launch of cruise missiles from ships based in the Caspian Sea. Russian submarine activity has also increased, although not quite to the level seen in the Cold War.

But Moscow might be best advised to heed Matthew 26:41 where maritime adventures are concerned; “Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.” The Russian Navy is a mess, and it will probably become more of a mess in the future.

Current Ships

The Russian Navy inherited a massive, modern fleet of surface ships and submarines. Most of these disappeared in short order, as Russia was incapable of maintaining such a flotilla. The remaining major units of the Russian Navy are very old, and in questionable states of repair. Of the twenty-four major surface combatants operated by the Russian Navy, three (the frigates of the Admiral Grigorovich class) were laid down after the end of the Cold War. Most of the holdouts from the Soviet Navy are approaching the end of their useful lifespans, although the Russians have made some effort at refitting and updating parts of the fleet.

How long the Russians can keep the aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov in a kind of service without a major refit is up for serious question, but despite ambitious promises no replacement has been laid down. The nuclear battlecruiser Pyotr Velikiy has remained active for the past decade, and reports persist that Admiral Nakhimov will return to service in the next couple of years, but both ships are in excess of thirty years old.

Future Projects

If Moscow built every ship that they had promised to build over the past decade, then the Russian Navy would indeed become a world class fleet. The Russian national security state thrives on the announcement of big projects, but not so much on their fulfillment. The actual record of Russian surface ship construction is, by international standards, rather grim.

The biggest successes of Russian shipbuilding have been the Admiral Grigorovich (4,000 tons) and the Admiral Gorshkov (5,400 tons) frigates. The former have endured construction times of roughly seven years; the latter of nine or so years. Two Grigorovich frigates have entered service, with four more under construction. The first Gorshkov should enter service sometime later this year, with three more on the way.

By contrast, it took the British about six years to construct the Type 45 destroyers; the Americans about four for an Arleigh Burke; the Japanese four years for an Atago; and the Chinese about four for a Type 052D. All of these ships are roughly twice the size of the frigates Russia is struggling to complete [and RCN?].

The twelve ships of the Lider class, a proposed 17,000 ton destroyer, could easily replace the existing cruisers and destroyers of the fleet, but there is little indication that the Kremlin plans to lay these ships down, much less complete them in a reasonable timeframe...

Submarines

The strength of Russia’s position depends, to great extent, on an evaluation of the centrality of nuclear submarines to naval power. Nuclear submarines, in both their ballistic missile and attack variants, are really the only things that the Russian shipbuilding industry has done well since the end of the Cold War. While the size of the flotilla has dropped (thirteen SSBNs, seven SSGNs, seventeen SSNs and about twenty diesels, depending on what’s available that day), the Russian Navy has worked hard to ensure that replacements are on the way. The eight submarines of the Borei class (three in service, five under construction) should serve as a capable deterrent for the foreseeable future, and the seven Yasen class nuclear attack submarines provide a modern complement to Russia’s existing stock of Sierra, Oscar and Akula class subs...

[More links at original of this para] Robert Farley, a frequent contributor to TNI, is author of The Battleship Book. He serves as a Senior Lecturer at the Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce at the University of Kentucky. His work includes military doctrine, national security, and maritime affairs. He blogs at Lawyers, Guns and Money and Information Dissemination and The Diplomat.
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/why-russias-once-superpower-navy-big-trouble-21796?page=show

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Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #283 on: August 21, 2017, 14:23:03 »
Plus on SSBN Borei-class front:

Mark
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A later article on the Knyaz Vladimir :

Russia to Launch its Deadliest Ballistic Missile Submarine in August

The Russian Navy will float out an improved variant of its latest class of ballistic missile submarines in the summer.

The Russian Navy will launch the first advanced variant of the nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine  (SSBN) Project 955A Borei II-class (“North Wind”) aka Dolgorukiy-class in August, the head of the Russian Navy, Admiral Vladimir Korolyov, announced on June 26 in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

The new boomer, christened Knyaz Vladimir (Prince Vladimir), will strengthen Russia’s sea-based nuclear deterrent, according to the admiral. “In August this year, the Severodvinsk-based Sevmash Shipyard will flout out the new Borei-class strategic underwater cruiser, the Prince Vladimir, which will strengthen the potential of the nuclear component of the Navy’s submarine fleet,” he said, TASS news agency reports.

The Knyaz Vladimir, the lead boat of the improved Borei II-class, was laid down in July 2012 at the Sevmash Shipyards in Severodvinsk, a port city on Russia’s White Sea, following a two year delay due to contract disputes between the Russian Ministry of Defense and the ship contractor, which pushed back the commissioning date of the ship from 2017 to 2018. The likely 2018 commissioning date was confirmed by Vice Admiral Viktor Bursuk, the deputy commander of the Russian Navy, in March.

The major difference between the Borei and Borei II-class is the latter’s capability to carry a much bigger nuclear payload, as I noted elsewhere (See: “Russia Will Start Constructing New Ballistic Missile Submarine in December”):


In comparison to the Borei-class, Borei II-class submarines are fitted with four additional missile tubes, boast smaller hulls and cons, and feature improved acoustics and lower sound levels, next to a number of other technical improvements.

Both variants of Borei-class subs will be armed with Bulava (RSM-56) intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). The Borei-class will be capable of carrying up to 16 Bulava ICBMs, whereas the improved Borei II-class can carry up to 20 ballistic missiles.

The improved variant of the Borei-class will be capable of launching 96-200 hypersonic, independently maneuverable warheads, yielding 100-150 kilotons apiece.

The Russian Navy plans to operate eight Borei-class SSBNs–three Borei-class and five improved Borei II-class boats–by 2o25. As of new, three Borei-class SSBNs have been commissioned to date with one submarine, the Yuri Dolgoruky, serving with the Northern Fleet and the remaining two–Alexander Nevsky and Vladimir Monomakh—deployed with Russia’s increasingly more active Pacific Fleet.

Next, to announcing the launch of the Knyaz Vladimir, Admiral Korolyov also told reporters on June 26 that Russia is developing a next-generation nuclear-powered submarines. “Along with this, work is already under way to develop fifth-generation nuclear-powered submarines,” the admiral said.

As I reported in June 2015, the new sub class will likely consist of two variants specifically designed for anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare missions. “The main purpose of the [underwater interceptor] is to protect groups of [ballistic] missile carrying submarines, and to battle with enemy submarines. The second ship will be a cruise missile carrier [used] for defeating coastal and surface targets,” a senior Russian defense industry official said at the time.
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Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #284 on: September 02, 2017, 15:09:35 »
Article Link

Red October Revisited: Massive Submarine Hunt Along Norwegian Coast

After a series of agonizingly unsuccessful submarine hunts in Sweden, searching for Russian subs seems to have become one of the Nordics' favorite pastimes. Even now, an intense hunt for an alleged Russian submarine is taking place along Norway's coast.

In the past few weeks, NATO has been at pains to locate a state-of-the-art Russian submarine along the Norwegian coastline. The suspected target is the Kazan (K-561), recently launched at Sevmash shipyard in Severodvinsk, the Norwegian news outlet Aldrimer reported.

According to Aldrimer, the hunt features maritime resources from the US, Canada, France, Germany and Norway. Maritime patrol flights are being carried out from Norway's Andøya and Bodø, Keflavik in Iceland, Lossiemouth in Scotland and also from French territory.

NATO defense sources told Aldrimer that the purpose of the extensive flights is to trace the current location of the Kazan, a Russian nuclear-powered Yasen-class submarine launched on March 31 this year. The same sources ventured that NATO completely lost track of the Russian submarine, which was rumored to have been monitoring the US-UK North Atlantic exercise Saxon Warrior 2017.

According to Aldrimer, the US and the UK have contributed the USS George H.W. Bush and the HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carriers, alongside a number of frigates, missile cruisers and a destroyer. Meanwhile, the Norwegian Navy contributed the KNM Helge Ingstad frigate to the search party. The US, Canada and France are responsible for scouting the southern parts of the search area, whereas Norway and Germany jointly run P-3C Orion surveillance aircraft in areas north of Andøya. The P-3C were previously revealed to be struggling with submarine detection.

The Twitter account MIL_Radar, which regularly reports on military aviation movements, recently published a map chart over the North Atlantic, which allegedly only reflected a small part of the operation. When confronted with the graphics and asked to clarify whether a submarine hunt was underway along the Norwegian coast, the Norwegian Armed Forces Operational Headquarters (FOH) declined to comment.

https://twitter.com/MIL_Radar/status/902218958207672321

The Kazan's predecessor, the Severodvinsk, which also became the flagship of the Yasen-class, has a submerged displacement of 13,800 tons, a length of 119 meters, can travel up to 31 knots per hour, even in submerged mode, and can dive to 600 meters.

Yasen-class submarines are widely regarded as being fearsome opponents with no adequate counterparts and are far quieter compared with older-generation Russian submarines. Russia plans to have at least eight Yasen class cruise-missile carrying attack vessels in its submarine fleet.
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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #285 on: January 05, 2018, 16:23:30 »
Russian navy, cruise missiles and deterrence, conventional and nuclear (NORAD, RCAF and RCN [ASW and surface-to-air missile capabilities on CSC] note):
Quote
The Russian Navy Is Relying More on Precision-Guided Weapons
And less on nukes for deterrence
By Dave Majumdar

The Russian navy will be focusing more effort on fielding new long-range precision-guided weapons as a form of non-nuclear strategic deterrence, reducing Moscow’s reliance on so-called “tactical” nuclear forces. Nonetheless, Russian forces are likely to retain significant non-strategic nuclear forces indefinitely into the foreseeable future.

“The Navy General Command will particularly focus on forming strategic non-nuclear deterrence groups that will include vessels armed with long-range precision weapons, as well as on improving the system of naval bases and ensuring balanced supply of weapons and munitions,” Commander-in-Chief Admiral Vladimir Korolyov told the TASS news agency.

The shift is a significant departure from previous policy, notes former Soviet and Russian arms control negotiator Nikolai Sokov, now a senior fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey.

“From a broader perspective this looks like a significant development because historically the Russian navy has been the greatest proponent of non-strategic nuclear weapons: they said they cannot face U.S. Navy without them,” Sokov told The National Interest.

“Now they not only have new weapons, but, more importantly, a new mission; new and more capable weapons will emerge eventually.”

“Moreover, weapons are usable and, perhaps even more importantly, can be deployed on a broad range of platforms, including those that have never carried nuclear weapons (big help to the Russian naval program — small vessels can be very tangible and it’s easier to cut funding for big-ticket items).”

However, while the new Russian development is significant, Moscow will still rely on its nuclear forces to some extent.

“This is part of an overall Russian strategy to bolster its conventional deterrence, and ability to retaliate with long range conventional weapons,” said Michael Kofman, a research scientist specializing in Russian military affairs at the Center for Naval Analysis.

“However it does not obviate the navy’s role in escalation control with non-strategic nuclear weapons as clearly stipulated in the naval doctrine signed in 2017.”

Russia’s conventional deterrence will be used in conjunction with its nuclear forces. “The two are not exclusive but complementary pursuits, as the former (non-nuclear deterrence) is intended to deter the U.S. from leveraging its conventional superiority, while the latter (nuclear deterrence with Non-Strategic Nuclear Weapons [NSNW]) is intended for escalation control [emphasis added].”

Indeed, all of Russia’s new long-range precision-guided weapons are dual nuclear and conventional capable weapons. “The missiles are the same, the difference is solely in the payload,” Kofman said. “You can logically assume that nuclear-tipped missiles will have substantially longer ranges [emphasis added, really?].”..
https://warisboring.com/the-russian-navy-is-relying-more-on-precision-guided-weapons/

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #286 on: February 03, 2018, 07:48:15 »
Very interesting ship.

https://youtu.be/E4iZv_Mjl0A

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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #287 on: May 05, 2018, 13:49:09 »
NATO and US Navy reacting to Russians and North Atlantic (e.g. growing nuked SLCM threat)--presume RCN will be represented at Norfolk:

Quote
'Great power competition': Nato announces Atlantic command to counter Russia
US to reactivate its Second Fleet and host new naval command in Norfolk, Virginia, amid rising tensions with Moscow

Amid rising tensions with Russia, the Pentagon has announced the official launch of a new naval command and the reactivation of the US Second Fleet to bolster the US and Nato presence in the Atlantic Ocean.

“The return to great power competition and a resurgent Russia demands that Nato refocus on the Atlantic to ensure dedicated reinforcement of the continent and demonstrate a capable and credible deterrence effect,” said Johnny Michael, a Pentagon spokesman. He said the new Nato command “will be the linchpin of trans-Atlantic security”.

The decision reflects escalating worries across Europe and within Nato over Russia’s increased military presence and patrols in the Atlantic region. Under the new plan, the US will set up Nato’s new Atlantic Command headquarters in Norfolk, Virginia.

Outlines of the plan were approved at the February meeting of Nato defence ministers as part of a broader effort to ensure the security of the sea lanes and lines of communication between Europe and North America. Nato secretary general Jens Stoltenberg told reporters at the time: “We have seen a much more assertive Russia, we have seen a Russia which has over many years invested heavily in their military capabilities, modernized their military capabilities, which are exercising not only conventional forces but also nuclear forces.”

He said the new Atlantic Command would be vital for the alliance to be able to respond. Nato also created a new logistics command, which is expected to be located in Germany.

At the same time, the US navy is re-establishing its Second Fleet command, which was was merged with the navy’s Fleet Forces command in 2011 to cut costs. The command will oversee ships, aircraft and landing forces on the east coast and northern Atlantic Ocean, and will be responsible for training forces and conducting maritime operations in the region.

Restarting the command was recommended in the navy study done following the two deadly ship collisions in 2017 that killed a total of 17 sailors. Admiral John Richardson, the chief of naval operations, said the move comes as the security environment “continues to grow more challenging and complex”.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/05/great-power-competition-nato-announces-atlantic-command-to-counter-russia?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

More:

Quote
Navy Reestablishes U.S. 2nd Fleet to Face Russian Threat; Plan Calls for 250 Person Command in Norfolk
https://news.usni.org/2018/05/04/navy-reestablishes-2nd-fleet-plan-calls-for-250-person-command-in-norfolk

From June 2016:

Quote
USN “Admiral Warns: Russian Subs Waging Cold War-Style ‘Battle of the Atlantic’”–and RCN?

Further to this post and the “Comments” on Russian subs (note cruise missile threat to North America)...
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/06/03/mark-collins-usn-admiral-warns-russian-subs-waging-cold-war-style-battle-of-the-atlantic-and-rcn/

Mark
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Re: The Russian Military Merged Thread- Navy
« Reply #288 on: August 24, 2018, 18:56:10 »
Hunting for Red October and cruise-missile subs--re-created USN Second Fleet to the Arctic and Russian SSBN havens (implications for NORAD):

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CNO: New 2nd Fleet Boundary Will Extend North to the Edge of Russian Waters

ABOARD AIRCRAFT CARRIER USS GEORGE H.W. BUSH – The boundaries of the Navy’s reestablished U.S. 2nd Fleet extends well past the old submarine stomping grounds of the Cold War and into waters north of Scandinavia and the Arctic Circle, near the submarine headquarters of Russia’s Northern Fleet, Chief of Naval Operations John Richardson said on Friday.

“A new 2nd Fleet increases our strategic flexibility to respond — from the Eastern Seaboard to the Barents Sea,” Richardson said. “Second Fleet will approach the North Atlantic as one continuous operational space, and conduct expeditionary fleet operations where and when needed.”

Richardson and new 2nd Fleet commander Vice Adm. Andrew Lewis stressed the standup of the new command was a reflection of the National Defense Strategy from Secretary of Defense James Mattis that signaled a return to “great power competition” with nation-states, rather than the low-intensity ground wars the U.S. has waged since 2001...

Former Deputy Secretary of Defense Bob Work told USNI News on Friday the extension of the boundary to Russia’s doorstep was in line with the new Mattis-led strategy.

“This truly is about great power competition and demonstrating it to the great powers that we can operate in waters nearby when and where we chose to do so. It’s signaling we’re here. We’re ready to go,” Work said.
“In China we have a rival that is really has a full-spectrum naval capability. The Russians truly are more of an undersea competitor. The best way to get there is to operate in those grounds close to them and not let them break out into the open ocean.”

...Richardson declined to talk to reporters about specific Russian capabilities he views as threats. However, it’s well known the Russian Navy has invested heavily in its attack submarine fleet and its new Kalibir land strike missile with about a 1,000-mile range...


https://news.usni.org/2018/08/24/cno-new-2nd-fleet-boundary-will-extend-north-edge-russian-waters

Mark
Ottawa


Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.