Author Topic: Second Language Training ( SLT )  (Read 169442 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Rider Pride

  • Mentor
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 29,388
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 4,816
  • Easy to draw, hard to spell
Re: Military performs poorly in bilingualism
« Reply #25 on: June 11, 2003, 19:32:00 »
RKC,
I just have one word to say in response to your post....

BULLSEYE!!!

When can you get elected and become MND.
"Return with your shield, or upon it."

Offline ~RoKo~

  • Living the dream. I think...
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • -330
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,035
  • Personal Text:
Re: Military performs poorly in bilingualism
« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2003, 20:04:00 »
I don‘t know if he Qualifies.. He sounds Pro military..   ;)

Offline Jungle

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 35,170
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,187
Re: Military performs poorly in bilingualism
« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2003, 21:40:00 »
I work in a bilingual unit. There are bilingual Anglophones, those who don‘t wait for the military to learn French. They go out and get the courses, then get the CF to pay for it. Some of them are actually very good. BUT, strangely, they rarely end up working in French. The opposite is very frequent: it is OK for a Franco from the Saguenay to work in English, but not for a Montreal-born Anglo to do so in French. The problem is, most Francos learn English on the job, not always realising the full meaning of the words they use, and end up getting warnings from the CofC or worse: a Harassment complaint !!! It‘s easy to whine when you have never experienced this kind of situation. Things are much easier when you ALWAYS work in your first (or only) language. Those who made the effort, who went the extra mile, will get the credit. YOU SNOOZE, YOU LOSE !!!
"I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind."
- John G. Diefenbaker. July 1, 1960. From the Canadian Bill of Rights.

Yard Ape

  • Guest
Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #28 on: July 26, 2004, 13:17:11 »
Bilingualism bolsters brain
CP
2004-07-26
http://www.canoe.ca/NewsStand/LondonFreePress/Today/2004/07/26/557084.html

TORONTO -- The federal government says bilingualism helps hold the country together, and a study says it may do the same for your aging brain. The study, headed by York University psychologist Ellen Bialystok, finds being bilingual helps prevent people from losing their "mental edge" as they age.

"Being bilingual is like going to a brain gym," says Bialystok, whose research is published in the American Psychological Association's journal, Psychology and Aging.

"It's like exercise for those frontal regions (of the brain) because being bilingual means you have to use them a lot more."

The frontal lobe controls the brain's "executive functions," processes that allow one to plan, stay focused and avoid distractions.

Handling one language is a big task for the executive functions, Bialystok says, but juggling two languages is even more work. In fact, speaking a second language actually creates physical changes in the brain by increasing blood and oxygen flow.

"If you're bilingual -- really, fluently bilingual -- your brain presents you with two options," she says. "Both language possibilities are there, and they are active and they are waiting to be chosen.

"So being bilingual means that every day, every time you use language, you've got to use those executive processes to make sure that whatever you're going to say next is coming out in the right language, and you're not getting misled by using the wrong language."

Over time, these mental gymnastics protect the brain by hindering the natural slowdown of the executive processes that occurs with age.

To prove this point, York researchers tested the cognitive function of 104 adults aged 30 to 59, and 50 adults aged 60 to 88. Half of the participants in each age group were monolingual, the other half bilingual.

The monolinguals were English-only speakers, but there were three types of lifelong bilinguals: English-Tamil, English-French and English-Cantonese. All subjects had similar education and income levels.

The experiment, called the Simon Task, measures a subject's reaction time when completing a simple task -- such as correctly identifying where a coloured square appears on a computer screen -- when presented with two competing options.

Bilinguals were faster on the test than monolinguals in each age group, says Bialystok.

Additionally, the study found that while monolinguals and bilinguals start slowing down at about the same age, around 60, monolinguals experienced a faster rate of mental decline.

"So what we found is that if you're bilingual, that normal slowdown is far less rapid, far less dramatic," Bialystok said, noting that natural aging is different from dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

These "serendipitous" findings are good news for Canada, she says, critiquing arguments for assimilation.

"Immigrants all come with this gift and we shouldn't try to stamp the languages out of them and out of their children."

According to data from the 2001 census, about 17.7 per cent of Canadians identify themselves as bilingual, the largest proportion at any time in Canadian history.

However, while 43.3 per cent of francophones could speak both official languages, only nine per cent of anglophones could do the same -- a glaring disparity that's persisted since Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau introduced the Official Languages Act in 1968.

In fact, bickering over bilingualism continues in political quarters with Conservative Leader Stephen Harper -- who once called bilingualism "the god that failed" -- reigniting the debate during the federal election campaign when a media leak suggested the Tories would cut the level of French services on Air Canada.

But Allan Smith, a history professor at the University of British Columbia, says resistance to bilingualism is not necessarily rooted in malice.

He says the issue has lost its "political edge" with the passing of key personalities such as Trudeau and the cooling of separatist tensions in Quebec. Others, like Harper, just don't consider it "practical."

"It's not like Europe, where you are tripping over people who speak a different language all the time."

Offline Lexi

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • -240
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 636
  • Hi.
    • Ducimus
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #29 on: July 26, 2004, 15:54:47 »
Yeah I heard about that on some radio show..

Pretty insteresting stuff, if only they made us learn French all through highschool...
62 Royal Hamilton Light Infantry
Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps

Semper Paratus!
Proud young supporter of the Canadian Armed Forces          :salute:

ags281

  • Guest
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2004, 05:09:05 »
Pretty insteresting stuff, if only they made us learn French all through highschool...

I theoretically "learned" French from grade 1 through 12. I say "learned" because obviously I didn't learn much since I still suck at it. Never really applied myself in it - just went through the motions - and now I have nothing to show for all that time in class. However, a couple years back I had a course in St. Jean, and I picked up more French there than I did in my entire year of grade 12.

I still can't speak French to save my life, but now I'm actually interested in learning (nothing makes you wish you had paid attention in French class more than meeting a girl so attractive it almost hurts to look at her and trying to carry on a conversation with her when she knows as little English as you do French ;)).

Offline Frank the Tank

  • Member
  • ****
  • -20
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 223
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #31 on: July 30, 2004, 20:47:53 »
Wouhoooo!!!  In your face suckerrrrrs!!!   :dontpanic:

Sorry, it was stronger than me!!  :P

If you want to learn french, the best place is out of Montreal..  where you won't have the choice of speaking english..  that's why I'm in Vancouver..  You don't speak the language, you just die!!   ::)

Next step, german and spanish..  and then, to an empty island where I can forget it all!!   ;D

Offline hoser

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • -30
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 325
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #32 on: July 30, 2004, 21:12:59 »
Ok, with St. Jean being not far from Montreal, does that make it a good or bad place to learn the language?  Is it far enough away that you're immersed in french?   

I'm really looking forward to Second Language Training, as its something I've always wanted to do (learn another language, no real preference), but never had the time or required motivation to do so.

Also, I second the motion that french throughout high school is pretty pointless.  I don't think its just a matter of not applying oneself, as I've known very motivated people (high 90s in all high school subjects) who did it throughout high school and still couldn't do much better than read the labels at a grocery store.  All it seemed to do was teach them a few key words and phrases, without any practical application of the language. 

EDIT:  Forgot to finish a sentence.  Perhaps I should concentrate on english more before I try tackling french.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2004, 20:23:12 by hoser »

Offline Frank the Tank

  • Member
  • ****
  • -20
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 223
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #33 on: July 30, 2004, 23:33:50 »
I don't know about St-Jean..  I guess it depends..  if you're talking about the CF base there, it might not be the best place, the city might be a good place, I've never been there..  Personnaly, I'm from Quebec City, the farthest east you go, the less english there is! except if you go more towards NB..  I can tell you that in Quebec City, except in hotels and in the old-Quebec, there's not that much english going around!!  ;)

BTW, Quebec IS the best city in the whole province!!!  :D
If anyone goes there, get a dictionnary and a map, people will help you!!   8)

ags281

  • Guest
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #34 on: July 31, 2004, 05:06:44 »
Unfortunately, I didn't get the benefits of language training in St. Jean, but I got a good preview of what to expect if I ever do get that training.

You can survive in St. Jean with just English (SLT course syllabus notwithstanding). However, you will also be surrounded by French and will learn some whether you want to or not. If you take a little bit of initiative and start trying to operate in French, you will learn very quickly. There is great potential there so long as you make the effort.

edit: stupid spelling
« Last Edit: July 31, 2004, 05:10:00 by ags281 »

Offline Spr.Earl

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 235
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,719
  • Grizzled Old Veteran
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #35 on: July 31, 2004, 05:26:56 »
The trouble in Canada is we teach Peresian French in school but with in Canada we have so many dialect's which have no relation to Peresian French as the language is spoken to day.
Those of us in the military know this,we have are blueberry's (french Canadian for a hillbilly)
We have Acadian French in New Brunswick as it was spoken 300 yrs ago!!

I gave up when it was forced up me!!

I speak so,so Spanish,Norwegian,Tagalog(Philippino)some German if need be and formal French which I have used at work to help Tourist's on the Ferries.

No prob's in learning a lingua but don't enforce it on me!! >:(


THE PRECEDING POST AND OTHERS MADE BY MYSELF ARE MY PERSONAL VIEWS, NOT FOR REPRODUCTION, NOT FOR CUT AND PASTE OF ANY PORTION THEREOF, NO QUOTES ARE PERMITTED ELSEWHERE,ANYWHERE OTHER THAN EXCLUSIVELY IN THIS WEB FORUM.




UBIQUE
Be Safe

Online Bruce Monkhouse

    Is a pinball wizard.

  • Lab Experiment #13
  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 240,130
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 14,741
  • WHERE IS MY BATON?
    • http://www.canadianbands.com./home.html
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #36 on: July 31, 2004, 20:01:46 »
Actually Earl, we have dialects in English also. Take three guys right off the rock and try to follow thier conversation......not likely!
Quote

I still can't speak French to save my life, but now I'm actually interested in learning (nothing makes you wish you had paid attention in French class more than meeting a girl so attractive it almost hurts to look at her and trying to carry on a conversation with her when she knows as little English as you do French ;)).
Quote

Go for it, sometimes it works out quite well! ;)
IF YOU REALLY ENJOY THIS SITE AND WISH TO CONTINUE,THEN PLEASE WIGGLE UP TO THE BAR AND BUY A SUBSCRIPTION OR SOME SWAG FROM THE MILNET.CA STORE OR IF YOU WISH TO ADVERTISE PLEASE SEND MIKE SOME DETAILS.

Everybody has a game plan until they get punched in the mouth.

Offline thesaurus(Banned)

  • Banned
  • Guest
  • *
  • 0
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 21
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #37 on: September 16, 2004, 21:39:15 »
Yeah I heard about that on some radio show..

Pretty insteresting stuff, if only they made us learn French all through highschool...

i give you a sample how unreasonably vindictive and tantrum ladened some french separatists have been when one made a quip that even the Supreme Court Justices of France, America and Canada would intellectually appreciate. There was this man who made an argument that the British have been the most liberal, multilingual and multicultural in language immersion. I do not know if that was the right word. But the british study and propagate  swahili, urdu, farsi, punjabi, greek, tagalog, french, etc. among her diplomats and intelligence officers, government employees, laison officers including prince william and prince harry to further propagate. Somebody posted this item on a chatroom. The french policiy makers passed a law or whatever you call that ..they opened the doors to the study of four european languages presumably minus english. oh my God. what can you make out of that. Have we been dealing with irrational, vindictive quebec separatists all along!!
« Last Edit: September 17, 2004, 08:19:51 by thesaurus »

Online Bruce Monkhouse

    Is a pinball wizard.

  • Lab Experiment #13
  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 240,130
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 14,741
  • WHERE IS MY BATON?
    • http://www.canadianbands.com./home.html
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #38 on: September 17, 2004, 07:19:52 »
Go away, troll....and take your other self with you...you know who I mean!
Bruce
IF YOU REALLY ENJOY THIS SITE AND WISH TO CONTINUE,THEN PLEASE WIGGLE UP TO THE BAR AND BUY A SUBSCRIPTION OR SOME SWAG FROM THE MILNET.CA STORE OR IF YOU WISH TO ADVERTISE PLEASE SEND MIKE SOME DETAILS.

Everybody has a game plan until they get punched in the mouth.

Offline thesaurus(Banned)

  • Banned
  • Guest
  • *
  • 0
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 21
Re: Bilingualism bolsters brain
« Reply #39 on: September 17, 2004, 07:53:24 »
The trouble in Canada is we teach Peresian French in school but with in Canada we have so many dialect's which have no relation to Peresian French as the language is spoken to day.
Those of us in the military know this,we have are blueberry's (french Canadian for a hillbilly)
We have Acadian French in New Brunswick as it was spoken 300 yrs ago!!

I gave up when it was forced up me!!

I speak so,so Spanish,Norwegian,Tagalog(Philippino)some German if need be and formal French which I have used at work to help Tourist's on the Ferries.

No prob's in learning a lingua but don't enforce it on me!! >:(




oh, my God that was one of the best arguments I have ever read. I felt about that too but not as articulate as you until you fed it to me.
8 stars for you!BUT  I love the french language! sorry.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2004, 08:05:02 by thesaurus »

Offline noreaga808

  • New Member
  • **
  • 0
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 44
French language training for NCM's
« Reply #40 on: December 22, 2004, 00:35:43 »
Does anybody know if french language courses are readily available to NCM's upon completion of initial MOC training? I'm asking here because the recruiting centres are closed for the holidays and DND's recruiting webpage is extremely vague about this. Also is it possible to transfer to R22eR a.k.a Vandoos once determined to have a satisfactory grasp on the language from taking such courses if available? I just feel that being immersed in an all french surrounding will accelerate my ability to be fully competent when using the language.  
« Last Edit: December 22, 2004, 01:01:10 by noreaga808 »
"Victory is Mine!"- Stewie Griffin

Offline hoser

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • -30
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 325
Re: French language training for NCM's
« Reply #41 on: December 22, 2004, 12:10:36 »
Take this for what its worth, but the platoon commander for my IAP/BOTP course (he's a PO1) said that he had been trying to get loaded on a french course for years, and he can't do it.  Keep in mind, his situation is a little different (being a platoon commander, and with the shortage of instructors he's a very valuable commodity).  Its certainly something worth asking at the recruiting centre, once they open back up.

Offline Pencil Tech

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 6,265
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 328
Re: French language training for NCM's
« Reply #42 on: December 22, 2004, 19:50:19 »
I can speak to this with some authority as in addition to being a reservist, I am the (ACOL) official languages coordinator for western area, and run the language school at Edmonton Garrison as a DND civilian.

 It used to be automatic for NCMs but it was dropped for money reasons, and quite honestly , because a great many new NCMs were not all that enthusiastic about sitting in a classroom for the better part of a year before soldiering, when many of them were just out of school as it was. Understandable, but the downside is in the situation that exists now with Valcartier where many Log, EME and now even Armoured trades are at full strength and young Francophone ptes just off there threes are being posted to Edmonton and other bases by the hundreds, are unilingual, and the language training is not mandated. We train them as they come in, if the units will let them go, but that's another story.

Anyway, a full range of second language training is available in Edmonton, Petawawa, Kingston, and Gagetown and to varying degrees on other Land Force bases, so when you arrive at your first posting contact the BCOL (Base Coordinator Of Official Languages), find out what's available and ask for SLT through your chain of command. Of course, if you go officer you still WILL get compulsory French training in St-Jean (up to 8 months worth) right after your BOTC.

Offline noreaga808

  • New Member
  • **
  • 0
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 44
Re: French language training for NCM's
« Reply #43 on: December 23, 2004, 00:14:08 »
Thanks guys, I'll be sure to contact the BCOL once I get to my first posting. I'm not entering as an Officer due to not having the educational requirements so the NCM route is the way for me. From what you've seen Pencil Tech what other languages are available to learn? Pencil Tech, I was going to say that you saved me a trip down to the recruting centre but I just realized I've got to go anyhow. I got my results from my civilian doctor, he cleared me so I'm good to go now. I'm dropping off my med. test results in the new year at the recruiting centre so hopefully I get merit listed right away and get sent off to Quebec within 3 months. Hey Pencil Tech, maybe in the future I'll run into you if I get posted to the PPCLI.  :salute:
"Victory is Mine!"- Stewie Griffin

Offline Pencil Tech

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 6,265
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 328
Re: French language training for NCM's
« Reply #44 on: December 23, 2004, 09:05:26 »
Noreaga, the Canadian Forces Language School in Ottawa is the only place where languages other than the two official ones are handled. Good luck on your enrolment and training and by all means look us up if you end up with 1 or 3 PPCLI.

Offline noreaga808

  • New Member
  • **
  • 0
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 44
Re: French language training for NCM's
« Reply #45 on: December 24, 2004, 03:49:17 »
I misunderstood your earlier post Pencil, I thought you meant more then one language was available on the mentioned bases. Hopefully whichever unit I get posted to will be up for letting me get second language training. I'll definitely look you up if I end up with either 1 or 3 PPCLI and get you out of that chair since you're Chairborne. ;D I'd be bound to run into you especially since you're running the place.
"Victory is Mine!"- Stewie Griffin

Offline Meridian

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 65
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 998
Leading in your "other" language
« Reply #46 on: January 06, 2005, 15:21:50 »
Im looking for some of the viewpoints from those here who may have become products of the SLT system, or were already functionally bilingual and that have led (either at the NCM level) or the officer level troops in the language OTHER than their maternal language.

(Ie if you are a Frenchy by birth, but learned English and then was posted to an English unit, or an English person who learned french then was posted to Valcartier or something)...

How hard did you find it?
Tips/tricks?


Also, what is the "interoperability" policy in the forces... I was under the impression that they wanted everyone to be bilingual so the various nets could be understood by those who need to understand...   Does "Working language = theatre/tactical language"?

Reason I ask is that Ive heard many English candidates who have gone through SLT and feek semi-comfortable ahve found themselves posted to 12 RBC or R22R or one of the other Valcartier Units...  I was just reading a diary where language (a French instructor trying to give directions to english troops) where they were not clear on his instructions...  is this a big issue?

I personally am functionally bilingual, and speak in french all the time at work, but I wouldn't claim to have all the lingo down or be french, myself... 

THnx for any comments.

Offline J.F.

  • Guest
  • *
  • -30
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 24
Re: French language training for NCM's
« Reply #47 on: January 11, 2005, 13:21:48 »
...do you have a comment on the possibility of French language training for a reserve officer in Calgary?...
Cheers, JF

Offline Pencil Tech

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 6,265
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 328
Re: French language training for NCM's
« Reply #48 on: January 11, 2005, 22:46:34 »
Hello J.F.,

The problem you face as a reservist is that if you are on Class "A" service you have to "sign in" for everything you put your uniform to do, so is your unit going to pay you to go to French classes? On the other hand, if you are on a Class "B" contract you will have to get permission from your employing unit to be absent from work . A bigger problem in Calgary is the military demographics of the area. We have run a couple of courses at ASU Calgary over the last couple of years but there are not a lot of potential candidates among reg force pers there and so the training opportunities are a bit on the sporadic side. I suggest you contact the MFRC at the Waters Building (41 Brigade HQ) as they from time to time run evening French courses for military spouses which reservists may attend.

Offline elminister

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • 0
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 79
Re: French language training for NCM's
« Reply #49 on: January 12, 2005, 13:47:03 »
Hey J.F. what about Toronto? Are there any possiblities that we could get some language training?
"Remember if you love something let it go and if it remains it's yours."