Army.ca Forums

The Newsroom => Current Operations => Topic started by: TrexLink on July 12, 2008, 11:33:47

Title: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: TrexLink on July 12, 2008, 11:33:47
Quote
Dying to serve Canada

Jul 12, 2008 04:30 AM

Alexander Panetta
THE CANADIAN PRESS

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan–They lost their limbs serving Canada, and now they're asking to be allowed into the country.

They are among the scores of young Afghan men who have been maimed or killed while working as interpreters for the international armies fighting in their homeland.

They have been shot at, blown up, tortured and threatened.

In at least one case, an interpreter's body was strung up in a public square and left to rot there for weeks as a lesson to anyone else thinking of helping the foreigners.

Hasham is one of these young men who survived.

Sporting a boyish smile and a late adolescent's peach fuzz, he describes how his future in Afghanistan vanished when a roadside bomb tore off his left leg.

Hasham dragged himself across the carpet in his living quarters yesterday, pulled on his only shoe, and hopped up to retrieve a document stored in a safe place by the door.

It is a letter from Canadian soldier Maj. Mike Lake, lauding him for his bravery and loyalty.

Hasham proudly hands over the letter and asks a Canadian journalist to use it to get him into Canada.

When told it's not that simple to immigrate to Canada – there are forms, fees, criteria, and paperwork – he breathes an exasperated sigh.

Canadian soldiers are encouraging their Afghan colleagues to start a union, saying it would protect them against things like arbitrary dismissal or delays in getting insurance payments when they're injured.

But Hasham says his only desire now is to live in Canada, either in Saskatchewan, or in that "French part" of the country, Quebec.

More: http://www.thestar.com/SpecialSections/article/459045 (http://www.thestar.com/SpecialSections/article/459045)
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: geo on July 12, 2008, 12:01:10
A difficult situation - for sure!

But, I think that things have to be put into perspective.

Canadian (and allied) troops are in Afghanistan - to support the Afghan government.  They (Afgh Gov<t) have asked us to come and help them eradicate the Taliban & their Ossama friend + the Opium.

Although we do use Afghan interpreters, they are employed to support us while we support their government.
Though I am certain that we do provide some form of financial compensation package to the injured afghan interpreters, I do not believe we have a responsibility to bail them out, forever & ever Amen!

We do not ask the Afghan government to provide financial support to the canadian troops that are injured in operations.  Should we ?

The Canadian Government does provide financial compensation to the Afghan people who accidentaly fall in the sights of our weapons or under the wheels / tracks of our vehicles.  We messed up and we do own up to our responsibilities.

How far should we go ???
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: TrexLink on July 12, 2008, 13:09:22
A good question, Geo.  I accept your arguments but on the other hand, the Afghan government's ability to support them is pretty limited ('nil' would be the word that comes to mind).  Given the willingness of successive Canadian governments to let in virtually anybody as a refugee, I would think it not unwarranted to bring them and their immediate families to Canada. Nobody I can think of is as hard-working as the Afghans and even with a peg leg, these guys are not going to be burden on our system. Further, they have proven their loyalty to things we espouse, like freedom, and have actually risked their lives for it - and our troops.  I would say they are better immigrant choices than many now claiming sanctuary in Canadian church basements these days.
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: forcerecon85 on July 12, 2008, 13:10:41
We do not ask the Afghan government to provide financial support to the canadian troops that are injured in operations.  Should we ?

Good point. I never thought of it that way.

I'd be open to letting immigration for Afghans that have assisted us in the field a little easier. Maybe with a letter of recommendation to separate everyday Afghans that want to live here. Not sure how to make the process easier though. 
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: geo on July 12, 2008, 14:06:43
Though injured, the Afghan people need these guys.
If they are able to lead a constructive life then I would contend that their country needs them  -  bringing them here would deprive Afghan of the industriour people they will need if the Karzai gov't is to succeed.

Canada should provide some health care infrastructure & help train the people who can help heal & educate our Afghan friends.... Period!
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: grmpz1 on July 12, 2008, 15:33:46
i've heard that the australians in iraq granted the iraqis that helped them in the campaign australian citizenship....so i guess the process could also work here
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: JayJay144 on July 13, 2008, 13:41:24
hi there this is my first post on the forum. My name is Jordan. Handed in my papers to the recruiting office recently so I've been reading through the site. It's been very helpfully and full of good information.

This is an interesting post I suppose for my first. Wouldn't these people be of value to the Defence department? The government doesn't have to grant them permanent citizenship but even if they were allowed to come to Canada on a temporary basis I think they would be able to pass on valuable information about the culture, the language and the like to soldiers and civilians who will be deployed. Just a thought. these people made the decision to help the coalition and their country when they could have easily gone the other way.
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: geo on July 13, 2008, 14:00:27
hi there this is my first post on the forum. My name is Jordan. Handed in my papers to the recruiting office recently so I've been reading through the site. It's been very helpfully and full of good information.

This is an interesting post I suppose for my first. Wouldn't these people be of value to the Defence department? The government doesn't have to grant them permanent citizenship but even if they were allowed to come to Canada on a temporary basis I think they would be able to pass on valuable information about the culture, the language and the like to soldiers and civilians who will be deployed. Just a thought. these people made the decision to help the coalition and their country when they could have easily gone the other way.
I don't see the purpose of offering them the equivalent of "assylum"... either you offer them citzenship - or you don't.

WRT valuable information.... umm... like what ?
remember, we've been there for something like 6 years already - they can be most valuable in theatre... not over here.
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: AirCanuck on July 13, 2008, 14:15:57
it's definitely a good point to put it in the point of view that we have been requested to help their government and not the other way around - my immediate reaction was to agree that we should do something to help these men immigrate but given the arguments that geo presented it definitely becomes less clear.  Given the fact that we are there at their request, it's definitely apt to point out that we don't request compensation from their government for our wounded men..
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: the 48th regulator on July 13, 2008, 16:34:19
Though injured, the Afghan people need these guys.
If they are able to lead a constructive life then I would contend that their country needs them  -  bringing them here would deprive Afghan of the industriour people they will need if the Karzai gov't is to succeed.

Canada should provide some health care infrastructure & help train the people who can help heal & educate our Afghan friends.... Period!

Here here,

Good thing we did not allow the Kraughts, Wops, or Japs to flood our shores in '45!

Otherwise who knows what would have happened to their countires after the war, or ours for that matter! ;)

dileas

tess
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: daftandbarmy on July 14, 2008, 00:41:47
How would you feel if Afghan employees of the CF in Afghanistan injured themselves on purpose, just to become Canadian citizens (to save their own lives and the lives of their families)?  For those on this forum who have seen the third world at it's worst I'm sure you'll agree that, if we set a precedent like this, it's likely to happen... alot.
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: ArmyVern on July 14, 2008, 00:56:59
Though injured, the Afghan people need these guys.
If they are able to lead a constructive life then I would contend that their country needs them  -  bringing them here would deprive Afghan of the industriour people they will need if the Karzai gov't is to succeed.

Canada should provide some health care infrastructure & help train the people who can help heal & educate our Afghan friends.... Period!

I agree with your sentiments on this Geo.

Imagine had all our vets who helped to liberate Europe stayed there afterwards. Canada would be such a poorer place for for it.

Afhghanistan needs these people who have stood up and fought for their country; they need them to help build it, and to teach their future generations that democracy is well worth the fight.
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: JayJay144 on July 14, 2008, 03:31:48
Here here,

Good thing we did not allow the Kraughts, Wops, or Japs to flood our shores in '45!

Otherwise who knows what would have happened to their countires after the war, or ours for that matter! ;)

dileas

tess


Canada could have ended up hiring nazi scientists like the US had that been the case. It wasn't too long after the war though that Italians (47) and Germans (1950) were allowed to immigrate to Canada. taken off the enemy aliens list.

getting back on track though it's a sticky topic. Canada lets in a small number of Iraqi refugees, and a slightly larger number of afghans each year.

http://www.cic.gc.ca/English/department/media/releases/2008/2008-03-19a.asp
http://www.cic.gc.ca/ENGLISH/department/media/releases/2008/2008-03-18.asp

anyways these people will try to immigrate regardless once they figure out the correct process. I can't argue the issue however you guys do make a strong point that they should be helping their country get off it's feet. at the very least they can still be of use somehow despite how they feel about being injured.




Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: Carcharodon Carcharias on July 14, 2008, 04:24:18
i've heard that the australians in iraq granted the iraqis that helped them in the campaign australian citizenship....so i guess the process could also work here

Greetings to fellow happy members and guests.

In answer to the above, not quite true, but many have been granted permanant residency. About 600 could be ellegible for this gesture. As for citizenship, after two years any person with permanant residency may apply. For sake of argument, they could stay 30 yrs, still remain as Australian permanant  residents (not Australian citizens) and Iraqi citizens. It would be an individual's decision to take out citizenship.

On a personal note, many locals we had working for us during my tour, had been working for the Australian government since 2003. Risking their own lives daily in transit to and from work as 'collaborators' of the Great Satan (many are and were indeed followed, and some have been killed, simply by being in the wrong place at the wrong time), and accompanying us during our daily missions as translators. IEDs, VBIEDs, SBIEDs, snipers etc was daily thing not only for them, but for us too.

I made good friends with a few, and I admire their bravery and dedication (as the pay is not that well), putting themselves at risk many times. Many still have families and extended families in Iraq, while others have sent family members to Jordan and other places for safety.

As much as I am not a lover of their religion and culture, I still would welcome any that I worked with as neighbours here, where the only thing you have to worry about is paying your Visa card.

I am looking forward to the day that I can host a BBQ here, with some of them.

I think it is noble of our government to give refuge to all that have worked for us over there, and I beleive it is a good idea overall.

My 2 bob.

Happy days,

OWDU
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: Danjanou on July 14, 2008, 09:45:56
Interesting argument. Of course one would need to ask if such a program were put in place, would all of them take advantage of it including as D&B suggests deliberately injuring themselves to move to the head of the line. I would like to think that for everyone who would wish to come here, there would be several who had no desire to do so and prefer to stay the course there. The cynic in me though says that while a noble gesture it has the potential to be open for abuse.

I’ve traveled extensively in the third world and much of my present job involves interacting with immigrants including both the best and the worst, those who are here simply to suck off our generous social welfare system.

Like Wes I'd have no problems with this particular individual becoming my neighbour. I may have to modify my BBQ menu a bit so as not to offend, but a small price to pay for someone who has already done so much for his country and mine.
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: geo on July 14, 2008, 14:09:43
Danjanou...
While I am not sure someone would injure himself to get to the front of the line.... the possibility that he might consider injuring himself to get his whole family to the front of the line might very well be an irresistible oportunity.

Help them to get into line is one thing - barging in - to the front of the line.... I don't think so.
Title: Re: WE LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND
Post by: Danjanou on July 14, 2008, 16:13:19
Our present Immigration system is broken as it is. Line cutting is only one area that needs to be fixed.
Title: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: GAP on May 01, 2009, 11:44:26
Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Updated Thu. Apr. 30 2009 6:19 PM ET The Canadian Press
 Article Link (http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20090430/afghan_workers_090430/20090430?hub=TopStories)

OTTAWA -- Canada is set to open its doors to hundreds of Afghans who face life-threatening risks after having worked with our military and diplomats, The Canadian Press has learned.

Immigration Minister Jason Kenney says he's putting the final touches on a policy to provide safe haven to Afghans endangered by their association with Canada.

Unlike other NATO countries, Canada has no policy on humanitarian immigration for local staff -- but that's about to change.

Afghans who have been severely injured working with the Canadian military, or who can prove they face threats, will be eligible for fast-track entry.

The first of those ex-employees and their immediate relatives could arrive within months.

The policy goes much further than the one initially considered by the Harper government, which last year said it would examine possible ways to bring over severely injured interpreters only.

The new program will be open to anyone with 12 months' service to the Canadian mission, medical and security checks, and a recommendation letter from a senior soldier or diplomat.

Kenney says his first preference is for them to resettle in safer parts of Afghanistan, because the last thing policy-makers want is an exodus of educated, liberal, English-speaking people from that country.

"Those kind of people are going to have to play a central role in the long-term construction of a stable and democratic Afghanistan," Kenney said in an interview.

"But in particular circumstances where we feel that a person's safety will be jeopardized by staying in the country, the door will be open to Canada. ...

"I think Canadians would be proud to help provide refuge to those who have helped our forces, aid personnel and diplomats."

Kenney said he expects hundreds of Afghan employees to benefit from the program, along with their immediate families.

Insurgents have gone to gruesome lengths to make an example of locals who work with NATO.

In one case, several interpreters' bodies were strung up in a public square and left to rot there for weeks as a lesson to anyone else thinking of helping the foreigners.

Government officials say the program is inspired by similar ones in the United States, Britain, Australia and Denmark.

Officials say they would receive many of the same services as refugees: income support for 12 months, health benefits and help preparing a CV and finding work.

The program is to be funded by the existing budget at Citizenship and Immigration.
More on link
 

Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: Colin P on May 01, 2009, 16:01:36
While I understand the concern of draining the educated class from the country, I think supporting the people that risk so much to help us is a worthy cause. For those that are wounded while working for us, deserve our long time support.
Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: Carcharodon Carcharias on May 01, 2009, 22:58:02
A good plan, as Australia has done the same, allowing up to 600 Iraqis employed by the ADF to come to Australia to start a new life. I have no idea on how many are accepting this generous offer. We did it for the South Vietnamese before our pullout from SVN, long before the boat people came here.

I would welcome 'Fil' our translator (from Baghdad), as a neighbour any day. He risked his life just coming in, and not including the VBIED/IED sniper threat daily on our missions outside the wire. He rode around in our LAVs like any one of us.  Fil was a former Iraqi Army officer, a LT, who was involved in the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. University educated, spoke excellent english, ran a profital business within our FOB, and was rather carismatic to say the least.

OWDU
Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: Otto Fest on May 03, 2009, 14:41:09
This makes a lot of sense.  For years we've been paying people to come to Canada and foster their culture without any loyalty to this country.  Giving these Afghanis a fast track is the smarth thing to do.
Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: Rider Pride on May 03, 2009, 23:20:00
"makes a lot of sense" and "right thing to do" just guarantees that some group of Canadian citizens will have a problem with this, and there will be some media seeking politician that will also disagree with it.
Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: X-mo-1979 on May 04, 2009, 03:18:23
Immigration shouldnt be a problem when they give reason for landing here to become citizens as "Due to helping your country my family and I will be killed if we remain in Afganistan"

I support their immigration here 100%.It's the least we can do.
Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: slayer on May 04, 2009, 16:40:04
Canadians are losing jobs by the thousands, and still our govt gives them to foreigners.
Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: Redeye on May 04, 2009, 16:55:48
Seriously?

No really, seriously?

I'm sorry, but what jobs exactly are being "given" to anyone by the government other than public service jobs and military jobs, most of which can't be held by "foreigners" in the first place?

Canadians are losing jobs because our economy is evolving.  Soon it will grow again and a myriad of new jobs will be created.  Never mind the fact that a lot of those jobs that those "foreigners" take are jobs that Canadians don't seem to be lining up for, and on top of that they are often very, very good at creating themselves jobs.  In Pickering where I work the convenience store next door to my office is run by an Afghan family, nice people.   The pizza shop in Oshawa I pick up dinner from sometimes, also run by an Afghan man, who employs a number of people.  There is quite a community in a few cities that these folks will probably be integrated into and thrive in.  Nothing wrong with that.  We owe them that much for the fact that they cannot safely live in Afghanistan anymore on account of their decision to help us make their country a better place.  So they come here, build themselves good lives, send money to relatives back home that helps them live better lives, and maybe one day they even decide to go home with whatever they learn from here and apply it there.  I don't see the problem.



Canadians are losing jobs by the thousands, and still our govt gives them to foreigners.
Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: jollyjacktar on May 05, 2009, 11:12:21
The Terps that I work with on a daily basis are all in a lather over this.  Some of these guys I believe could easily come home and make the adjustment to life in Canada with minimal culture shock.  Some of the others not so much.  Still, they have paid dues to us by their past and present service.  This is a right thing to do and about bloody time.  I hope that some of them get the nod.
Title: Re: Canada to welcome hundreds of Afghan employees
Post by: MCG on May 05, 2009, 13:00:47
If the article's title is correct and it is "hundreds" then this may actually be a disservice to Afghanistan and run counter to some of our objectives (As stated in the article, Afghanistan cannot afford for us to export too significant a number of its "educated, liberal, English-speaking people").

However, if the program is aimed at tens/dozens (even into the several tens & dozens) then I do not see any harm.
Title: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: George Wallace on September 15, 2009, 12:34:12
How does this bring stability to Afghanistan?

 
Quote
Ottawa to open doors to local Afghan workers  
TheStar.com September 15, 2009 Bruce Campion-Smith Ottawa Bureau Chief
 Article Link (http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/695694)

OTTAWA–They are privy to some of military's sensitive strategies in Afghanistan, face death alongside Canadian troops and now will be offered safe haven in Canada.

The federal government is prepared to open its doors to hundreds of Afghan citizens who have worked alongside Canadian soldiers and diplomats in Afghanistan.

The initiative recognizes that Afghans often face risks and reprisals from insurgents as a result of assisting Canadians in the war-torn country.

Immigration Minister Jason Kenney will announce the program today as Ottawa releases a report card on its military and development efforts in Afghanistan.

The first choice has been to resettle Afghans and their immediate families in other parts of Afghanistan. But when that's not possible, the federal government will move them to Canada.

In this country, they will be given many of the same benefits as refugees – income support and health care – and be put on the path to obtaining Canadian citizenship.

Canadians in Afghanistan rely heavily on local workers in the camps and as interpreters.
More on link


This is freaking madness.  We are spending hundreds of billions of dollars in sending troops and equipment, Police advisors, Corrections Canada advisors, NGOs, OGAs, aid, etc. to Afghanistan attempting to bring stability to the Region.  The very people we are helping and benefiting and are our hope to continue this work after we are gone, are these very people Jason Kenny now wants to bring to Canada.  This makes absolutely no sense.  We are bringing people from a different culture, society, education, and religion out of their native land, where they can continue to contribute to the rebuilding of their nation, here to Canada where not only they will have a serious case of culture shock, but be placed on Welfare Rolls, probably in a ghetto, all at the Taxpayers expense.  This is sheer madness.









 





Title: Re: How does this help bring stability to Afghanistan ?
Post by: Shec on September 15, 2009, 12:42:28
Is this evidence of a defeatist mentality?   Conjures up memories of the last flights out of Saigon.  I realize that our combat role is programmed to end in 2011 but that does not mean we're raising the white flag.
Title: Re: How does this help bring stability to Afghanistan ?
Post by: milnews.ca on September 15, 2009, 12:48:29
We are bringing people from a different culture, society, education, and religion out of their native land, where they can continue to contribute to the rebuilding of their nation, here to Canada where not only they will have a serious case of culture shock, but be placed on Welfare Rolls, probably in a ghetto, all at the Taxpayers expense.

I'm looking forward to more details:  are they talking interpreters and low-level folks/"fixers", or cops/soldiers/bureaucrats?  In the case of the former, there might be some cases where they have no future once the folks they helped leave, but in the case of the latter, what GW said....

How does this bring stability to Afghanistan? .... This is sheer madness.
Title: Re: How does this help bring stability to Afghanistan ?
Post by: Target Up on September 15, 2009, 12:50:20
Yeah, I mean it's not like they're Russians, or Chinese, or Philippinos, or Indians.  You know, those immigrants who are instinctively tuned in to Canadian culture and blend in seamlessly without forming their own communities.
Title: Re: How does this help bring stability to Afghanistan ?
Post by: dapaterson on September 15, 2009, 12:51:32
When the West declares victory and goes home, and Afghanistan reverts to its traditional warlordism (everyone expecting a Jeffersonian democracy to take root before 2011, please raise your hand) many who supported the NATO troops will be identified as traitors and targetted for elimination.

On the moral plane, what do we owe those who supported us and worked for us?  "Thanks for coming out, sucks to be you."?  Or do we offer them an opportunity to leave with us?

Not ideal by any stretch of the imagination for some of the reasons George mentions.  I would strongly suggest that the "ghettoes and welfare rolls" is not the probable result; most first and second generation immigrants have a tremendous work ethic (particularly compared to some of their slovenly XXth generation Canadians confreres, suckign at the teat of public support from generation to generation) and contribute well to Canadian society.


Basic question:  Do we abandon those who help us?
Title: A bit more detail....
Post by: milnews.ca on September 15, 2009, 13:02:42
...thanks to a news release just out (http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/Citizenship-And-Immigration-Canada-1045031.html) (highlights mine):
Quote
The Government of Canada will offer special measures to facilitate immigration to Canada for certain local staff who face exceptional risk or who have suffered serious injury as a result of their work for the Canadian government in Kandahar province, Afghanistan.

"There are Afghans who face extraordinary personal risk as a result of their work in support of Canada's mission in Kandahar," said Jason Kenney, Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism. "We commend their bravery to help build a better Afghanistan while recognizing the price that they have paid. Their lives and those of their families may be threatened by insurgents, and some have suffered serious injury and can no longer work. To recognize their contribution, we will offer them special consideration if they wish to relocate to Canada."

The government plans to implement these measures in October 2009. In general, applicants must demonstrate that they face individualized and extraordinary risk or have suffered serious injury as a result of their work with the Canadian government. In addition, the applicant must have worked at least 12 cumulative months in Kandahar in support of the Canadian mission.

Spouses of Afghan nationals killed because of their work with the Canadian government will be eligible. All will have to meet standard immigration requirements, including criminal, medical and security screening. The accompanying dependent children of those who qualify would also be eligible.

Canada's approach is consistent with the objectives of similar programs offered by the United States in Afghanistan and the United Kingdom, Australia and Denmark in Iraq.

Successful applicants will receive health-care coverage under the Interim Federal Health Program as well as resettlement services similar to what is currently offered to government-assisted refugees, including up to 12 months of income support upon arrival in Canada. Applicants may apply under this program until the end of the Canadian combat mission in Kandahar in 2011.
The last part I highlight in yellow because I believe this will "disincent" ANY Afghan from wanting to help Canadians, even if there is even a notional presence left, post 2011.
Title: Re: How does this help bring stability to Afghanistan ?
Post by: George Wallace on September 15, 2009, 13:15:28
What a can of worms.  Not only is your highlighted portion a fairly damning point, but I beg to question how anyone is going to perform a timely and thorough criminal, medical and security screening that is acceptable to national standards currently in effect?

This is nothing more than a "feel good" political move by not only our politicians, but many other nations (as stated in the articles) to save some face after abandoning the Afghan people.
Title: (A bit) more info....
Post by: milnews.ca on September 15, 2009, 13:31:24
.... from the backgrounder (http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/backgrounders/2009/2009-09-15.asp) to the earlier news release:
Quote
The Government of Canada will offer special immigration measures for certain Afghan nationals who have served as local staff in Kandahar province.

To be eligible, the individual must provide evidence of:

    * Extraordinary and individualized risk as a result of employment and contracts in direct support of the Canadian government in Kandahar; OR
    * A non-accidental or non-natural injury, resulting in risk to life or inability to work, due to employment and contracts in direct support of the Canadian government in Kandahar; OR
    * Being the spouse of a local staff member who has suffered a non-accidental or non-natural death due to employment and contracts in direct support of the Canadian government in Kandahar. The accompanying dependent children of those who qualify would also be eligible.

In addition, the local staff member must have at least 12 months of cumulative service with the Canadian government in Kandahar.

A committee of senior Canadian officials from departments active in Kandahar, such as the Department of National Defence/Canadian Forces, Public Safety Canada and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, will be put in place to recommend whether the individual meets the selection criteria for participating in this program. If the committee determines that the individual meets the program requirements, the individual will be referred to Citizenship and Immigration Canada for processing and a final immigration decision.

Applicants who qualify for the special measures will also be required to undergo immigration medical screening as well as criminality and security screening by our partners: the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Those who do not qualify may still apply under existing immigration measures, such as the economic and family classes. Those who don’t meet immigration criteria can request humanitarian and compassionate consideration. Such applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

There are an estimated 300 Afghans who are providing direct support to Canada’s mission in Kandahar and may be at risk. Canada expects that up to 50 principal applicants, plus an average of two immediate family members, totalling 150 people, will be eligible each year. There is no cap, however, on the number of people who may become permanent residents under these measures. The annual cost of implementing the special measures is estimated at $3 million a year and will be funded out of existing departmental budgets. The program will conclude in 2011 to correspond with the scheduled end of Canada’s combat mission in Kandahar.
Title: Re: How does this help bring stability to Afghanistan ?
Post by: Larkvall on September 15, 2009, 13:34:00
I don't think too many of these guys will end up on welfare, but I do agree with George that this does not help to bring stability to Afghanistan. These are the types of people that are needed for Afghanistan to build itself into a proper nation (whatever that means). If it is such a forgone conclusion the country is going to go down the toilet why don't we just pull out now?
Title: Re: How does this help bring stability to Afghanistan ?
Post by: E.R. Campbell on September 15, 2009, 15:18:38
When the West declares victory and goes home, and Afghanistan reverts to its traditional warlordism (everyone expecting a Jeffersonian democracy to take root before 2011, please raise your hand) many who supported the NATO troops will be identified as traitors and targetted for elimination.

On the moral plane, what do we owe those who supported us and worked for us?  "Thanks for coming out, sucks to be you."?  Or do we offer them an opportunity to leave with us?

Not ideal by any stretch of the imagination for some of the reasons George mentions.  I would strongly suggest that the "ghettoes and welfare rolls" is not the probable result; most first and second generation immigrants have a tremendous work ethic (particularly compared to some of their slovenly XXth generation Canadians confreres, suckign at the teat of public support from generation to generation) and contribute well to Canadian society.


Basic question:  Do we abandon those who help us?


I'm with dapaterson, point by point. There will be a few short term costs but I do not see how we could offer less.

Remember "one is too many"? Never again.
Title: Update: Not So Much Progress
Post by: milnews.ca on January 25, 2010, 08:28:36
In May 2009, we hear the first hints of something being worked on (http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=85864.msg838563#msg838563).

In September 2009, we hear Canada's commitment to act (http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/releases/2009/2009-09-15.asp).

In January 2010, the Canadian Press says it's not going as well as one would hope (http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5j_kG_W8D5glT5EAFkswhFzESIsCg):
Quote
Canadian soldiers might be long gone from Afghanistan before Afghans who risked their lives in support of the mission are ever allowed into Canada.

Nine months after Ottawa promised to expedite immigration applications from those Afghans, the new bureaucratic maze they have to navigate has barely sputtered into existence.

(....)

Applicants must first fill out a form and hand it along with supporting documentation to a third party in Kandahar city - the International Organization for Migration, an intergovernmental agency.

The organization then passes approved applications to a "joint referral committee," comprising senior Canadian military and civilian officials at Kandahar Airfield.

The committee does not yet exist.

In a series of email exchanges, Citizenship and Immigration Canada said implementation of the program has been "negatively impacted" by the security situation in Kandahar.

However, it said, the third-party agency was "continuing to provide information and assistance to potential applicants." ....
Title: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: ColdNorth on May 25, 2010, 19:27:23
Found on 680 News Toronto's website.

http://www.680news.com/news/national/article/58973--cda-finally-processing-entry-requests-for-afghan-interpreters-but-few-make-cut (http://www.680news.com/news/national/article/58973--cda-finally-processing-entry-requests-for-afghan-interpreters-but-few-make-cut)


Cda finally processing entry requests for Afghan interpreters, but few make cut

CALGARY - More than a year after Ottawa promised to fast-track immigration applications for Afghan translators a narrow list of applicants who meet the criteria to come to Canada has been compiled.

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney originally announced the program for Afghans who face "extraordinary personal risk" in support of Canada's mission to Kandahar.

But out of 114 applications only 25, or roughly 21 per cent, have been approved to come to Canada by the joint committee made up of officials from the departments of National Defence, Foreign Affairs, International Development and Immigration and Citizenship. The committee works in conjunction with the International Organization for Migration, an intergovernmental agency.

"We're beginning to process some of the approved applications. There was a delay because we need to work as well through the International Organization for Migration and they removed all their staff for security reasons in Kandahar," Kenney said in a recent interview.

"The security situation has made it go slower than I would have liked but we're finally starting to process some of those positive applications and some of those people should be settling in Canada shortly."

Neither Kenney nor officials in his department could say exactly when the successful immigrants, who are allowed to bring along two family members each, would finally be arriving in Canada.

Applicants require 12 months service to the Canadian mission and a recommendation letter from a senior soldier or diplomat. They also need to meet standard immigration criteria such as criminal, medical and security screening before being allowed to come to Canada.

They're not considered refugees, but special immigrants who fall through the cracks of current law. At the time Kenney said he expected "a few hundred'' successful applicants to qualify by the time the mission and the program ends in 2011.

The life of an interpreter who works with the NATO-led mission can be a dangerous one. An unexpected knock, a threatening late-night phone call, or a so-called "night letter'' nailed to the front door — such intimidation tactics are a chilling fact of life for locals who work as translators for the Canadian Forces or federal agencies on the ground in Afghanistan.

Insurgents have gone to gruesome lengths to make an example of locals who work with NATO. In one case, several interpreters' bodies were strung up in a public square and left to rot there for weeks as a lesson to anyone thinking of helping the foreigners.

Both the delay and the low number of interpreters that have so far been approved is a concern to Liberal MP Dan McTeague, the party critic for consular affairs.

"Obviously the time this has taken is painfully slow and certainly an agonizing time for those who have been given assurances that everything would be done at the early stages," said McTeague.

"It's a troubling statistic. One would hope that the numbers do reflect the need and that we are not leaving someone behind unduly who might otherwise suffer as a result of our ability to determine who is legitimate and who isn't."

McTeague said for those who have been working with Canadian efforts going back to 2005, the wait can be seen as "stretching the limits" of what would be considered fast-tracking.

The interpreters — "terps," in military parlance — are vital in the coalition's effort to communicate with most Afghans. By the country's usual standards, it's lucrative work — $600 a month, compared with the national average of just $300 a year. Afghan soldiers, by comparison, make $250 a month.

Many interpreters live and travel full time with Canadian soldiers, helping commanders converse with village elders, politicians or local villagers.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on May 26, 2010, 12:29:59
About friggin time!  I do hope some of the Terps I worked with make it here.  They deserve a chance to live in peace.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on May 26, 2010, 13:09:25
More on this here:
http://forums.milnet.ca/forums/index.php/topic,89135
Title: Meanwhile, NLD doesn't seem to be doing much....
Post by: milnews.ca on July 20, 2010, 13:54:47
....for their terps - from Radio Netherlands Worldwide (http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/dutch-military-abandons-afghan-helpers):
Quote
The 102 interpreters who have assisted the Dutch military mission in Afghanistan are angry. Although they have risked their lives for the country, the Netherlands has abandoned them. The Americans, by comparison, are allowing their interpreters and translators to apply for visas to travel to the United States.

The Afghan interpreters are not actually permitted to talk to journalists but they don't care any more. With the Dutch leaving the southern province of Uruzgan soon - on 1 August - their contracts have been terminated. They feel they are being forced to return to their families. But that's part of the problem - they complain in interviews with Radio Netherlands Worldwide - they are afraid the enemy will target them – and hence possibly their loved ones too - for working with the "heathens".

(....)

The Dutch defence ministry confirms that all contracts have been "formally ended". It does not feel any responsibility since "they belong to NATO not to the Netherlands". A spokesperson said "We have told our successors, the Americans and Australians, these guys are good translators, take them over. So I think they'll land on their feet."

(....)
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: 40below on July 20, 2010, 14:17:12
As far as I'm concerned, they should have handed out a Canadian passport to every terp who signed up to work with them. Without terps, the CF is nothing in Afgh, you can't do COIN and you have no HUMINT, all the army can do is shoot people.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: Big Red on July 20, 2010, 15:32:59
As far as I'm concerned, they should have handed out a Canadian passport to every terp who signed up to work with them. Without terps, the CF is nothing in Afgh, you can't do COIN and you have no HUMINT, all the army can do is shoot people.

This is not entirely true. We actually had nine years to train soldiers to speak Pashtu/Dari. We were lazy and chose to rely on local national interpreters rather than developing our own language capability to augment them.

Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: dapaterson on July 20, 2010, 15:45:44
... but we do send one person a year on a two-year Korean language course so they can go to staff school in Korea.


It's all about priorities, you know...

Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: GAP on July 20, 2010, 15:48:36
So.....you mean in 40-50 years we will send someone to Afghanistan to learn to speak Pashtu/Dari, but will they have a staff college by then?  :)
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on August 02, 2010, 08:45:12
Latest (http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/100802/national/afghan_cda_translators?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter) from the Canadian Press:
Quote
Ottawa's promised fast-track immigration policy for Afghan translators has left many interpreters stuck in the starting-blocks and fearing for their lives.

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney originally announced the program to assist Afghans who face "extraordinary personal risk" because of their support for Canada's mission in Kandahar.

Kenney said he expected "a few hundred" successful applicants to qualify by the time the mission and the program ends next year but as of the end of May only 25 of 114 applications had been approved.

One interpreter, who goes by the name of Mojo to protect his real identity, said he was rejected but doesn't understand what the government means by "extraordinary personal risk."

He said all interpreters helping the mission are considered to be the eyes of NATO and could be killed once Canada pulls out ....
Title: More on how the Dutch and US deal....
Post by: milnews.ca on August 04, 2010, 10:58:31
....with interpreters (or not) from Radio Netherlands Worldwide (http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/afghan-interpreters-after-dutch-have-gone):
Quote
The end of the Dutch military mission in Afghanistan’s Uruzgan province also means the end of four years’ service for local interpreters. They say they shared the tough experiences of the Dutch and ran major risks too.

They expected more from the departing Dutch. Most, despite any misgivings they have, will be starting work with the United States forces which are taking over from the Dutch in the southern Afghan province. But the interpreters fear their new allegiance will lead to even more hatred from their fellow Afghans. “The Americans give out visas after two years. That’s what I’m pinning my hopes on,” one of them admits.

“I can’t just go back to my village. It’s better not to show my face there. People know I work for the Westerners.”

Dutch members of parliament have been asking questions in the house about the lack of follow-up support for the interpreters. Similar questions were asked after Dutch forces withdrew from Iraq but, says Dutch Labour MP Angelien Eijsink, absolutely nothing was done. The US army, however, does have a programme to take care of local staff who have run risks or may be in present danger.

On leave

There were 102 interpreters working for the Dutch a month ago, but the group is disintegrating fast. Twelve gave up the job when they had to start working with Australian troops. Others have been given completely new jobs, but their former colleagues say they have just disappeared. On Sunday, one interpreter took a plane home. Last week, two others quit, leaving for Kandahar in a heavily armed convoy. Three more who were ‘on leave’ have failed to return.

The remaining 70 are all anxious to secure one of the remaining interpreting jobs with the Dutch following last weekend’s official handover of command in Uruzgan to the US. However, there are only 14 of these ‘Dutch posts’ to be had. The rest have no alternative other than that of joining the Americans.

(....)

The Dutch gave a barbeque for the interpreters last week and handed out certificates for the work they had done, but they had similar testimonials already.

“It’s not that there’s no work for us. We’re in great demand with the various armies here. It’s about the Netherlands not understanding our position. What it’s like for the lads who face danger when they get home. And definitely for those who were wounded while alongside Dutch troops in combat.”
Title: Terps Getting Boned with Refined Rules?
Post by: milnews.ca on August 10, 2010, 08:19:59
I feel dumb for not having spotted this sooner, but former diplomat Eric Morse highlights how "we're dooming our Afghan helpers" (http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/dooming+Afghan+helpers/3378877/story.html) - highlights mine:
Quote
.... A statement obtained by CP from the Minister's Office states that "The applicant must demonstrate that: the threat is directly related to the individual's support of the Canadian mission in Kandahar, or directly related to an immediate family member's support of the Canadian mission in Kandahar; and the threat is greater than the level of risk faced by the many others working for the Canadian government in Kandahar province in general." The sanctimony alone in that statement is stupefying.

The idea that "extraordinary risk" can be quantified -- let alone evaluated -- by an interdepartmental committee of Ottawa-based bureaucrats beggars credulity. It exposes Canada as pettifogging, mean-minded, self absorbed, callous ....

(Sure enough, further down in the article I posted here
http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,89135.msg959677.html#msg959677
you find the quote attributed to "the (M)inister's office".)

Note the second half of the quote I highlighted - it appears a terp has to prove he's in MORE danger than anyone else working for Canadians in order to make it onto the fast track.  Interestingly enough, I can't find that nuance in the public information distributed by Canada last year:
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/releases/2009/2009-09-15.asp
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/backgrounders/2009/2009-09-15.asp
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/backgrounders/2009/2009-10-30a.asp
I've attached a screen capture of the material in case the links don't work for you.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: GAP on August 10, 2010, 09:07:15
I wonder how this deciding committee would react if we put them under similar threat.......
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: George Wallace on August 10, 2010, 09:16:22
I wonder how this deciding committee would react if we put them under similar threat.......

Problem is they can not fathom what the threat is.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on August 10, 2010, 10:27:18
Problem is they can not fathom what the threat is.
Much less figure out whether the threat the terps are facing is more than the others working for Canadians.   >:(
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on August 10, 2010, 10:29:26
My fear is that they will be left out hanging in the breeze when we all leave and they will pay a heavy price.  I worked with a Vietnam vet who had spent two tours in the mountains with the Green Berets.  He said he always felt badly that promises were made to these people and they were deserted when the US left, with dire consequences to those folks.  My Terps became my friends and I would hate to see them or their families get hurt if we let them down too.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on September 26, 2010, 06:52:46
The latest (http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/100926/national/afghan_cda_interpreters) via the Canadian Press - highlights mine:
Quote
Canadian soldiers had just arrived in Kandahar province in 2006 when a local interpreter — everyone knew him simply as Max — took some shrapnel to his left eye from a Taliban rocket-propelled grenade.

The attack came during Operation Medusa, one of the bloodiest of the war. The driver sitting in front of Max was killed in the blast; the two soldiers riding with him were also injured.

Max, who cannot be identified because he continues to help Canadian troops bridge the language cap with local villagers, was evacuated to the base at Kandahar Airfield, where he underwent emergency surgery, with at least one follow-up operation.

His left eye still bears the scars of that battle.

And yet Max has twice been turned down in his efforts to immigrate to Canada under a new fast-track program for Afghans who face "extraordinary personal risk" because of their work with the mission in Kandahar.

"The first time, they said I was missing one piece of paper," Max said in an interview. The second time, they said he did not qualify.

"They denied me. I don't know why."

(....)

.... 10 months from the July pullout date, only about 50 of 250 applicants are "moving forward in the process," said Douglas Kellam, spokesman for Citizenship and Immigration Canada. The department has fielded some 280 additional inquiries from potential applicants, he added.

"Should they all pass security, criminality and health screening, they will be accompanied to Canada by some 75 eligible family members (wives and dependent children)," Kellam said in an email response to queries.

"As with all immigration programs, not everyone who applies is approved."

Capt. Annie Djiotsa, spokeswoman for Canada's Task Force Kandahar, said approximately 6,000 interpreters have worked for the Canadian Forces throughout Afghanistan since 2006.

The job is a perilous one and has a high turnover rate, Djiotsa said ....
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: PuckChaser on September 26, 2010, 14:06:51
Government bureaucracy at its finest.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: shamu on September 26, 2010, 16:18:06
"This makes absolutely no sense."

Help Canadians in combat and you are considered for immigration.  Sounds reasonable.

"We are bringing people from a different culture, society, education, and religion out of their native land,"


Such is the entire history of all Canadians (with the arguable exception of first nations, inuit).

where they can continue to contribute to the rebuilding of their nation,

Hard to do if they are dead.  There's like what, 250 applications in?  There is also the ability to help rebuild as a Canadian/Land Immigrant.  Obviously we don't want to import all talent from the country, but there's like +30,000,000 of them... Personally, I'll take a Immigrant who genuinely helped Canadian troops in Afghanistan over an Immigrant who hasn't.

here to Canada where not only they will have a serious case of culture shock, but be placed on Welfare Rolls, probably in a ghetto, all at the Taxpayers expense.  This is sheer madness.

Sheer ignorance. Stereotyping, bigoted non-sensible ranting, blowing a story out of proportion.... 

No need to reply, George Wallace.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: PuckChaser on September 26, 2010, 16:37:39
Took me a while to find out where your purple text is coming from, then I realized you're attempting to quote a post that was made over a year ago, and has since been replied to a bunch of times.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: George Wallace on September 26, 2010, 18:04:20
shamu

In all your rabid vitriol attack on me, taking words and not the whole statement, you made a biased rant and never really looked at what I was saying. 


How does this bring stability to Afghanistan?

 

This is freaking madness.  We are spending hundreds of billions of dollars in sending troops and equipment, Police advisors, Corrections Canada advisors, NGOs, OGAs, aid, etc. to Afghanistan attempting to bring stability to the Region.  The very people we are helping and benefiting and are our hope to continue this work after we are gone,  are these very people Jason Kenny now wants to bring to Canada.  This makes absolutely no sense.  ................

Then again, you may want to abandon the Afghan people altogether.  Leave them without any training or infrastructure.  We aren't going to solve anything in Afghanistan by bringing all their brightest to Canada.  We will have solved nothing.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on November 12, 2010, 18:49:41
Makes sense to me - this (http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/101112/national/afghan_cda_translator) from the Canadian Press:
Quote
Ottawa may extend its fast-track immigration policy for Afghan translators who help the Canadian Armed Forces and aid workers in Kandahar if troops remain in Afghanistan beyond 2011.

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney said Friday it would make sense to continue the program for as long as such translators work with Canadians.

"The basic principle is any Afghan whose life is at risk because they've assisted Canadian Forces or aid workers we're going to give them fair consideration for expedited immigration to Canada," Kenney said Friday.

(....)

"We'll cross that bridge when we come to it. We have applications in the queue we're reviewing right now. We'll focus on those first."

The application process has been slow and cumbersome.

There have been about 250 applications so far. Each has to be approved by a committee made up of officials from the departments of National Defence, Foreign Affairs, International Development and Immigration and Citizenship.

The committee works with the International Organization for Migration, an intergovernmental agency based in Kandahar.

"Partly it's because of the security situation. We have an interdepartmental committee that's asked to meet and review the applications and for a while some of the NGO's had pulled out of the region," Kenney said.

"We've been able to get that back together now and I think the process is speeding up. We're on track to receive between 150 and 200 by the time the program is over." ....
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on December 22, 2010, 11:01:43
Seems like someone in the contractor's office has some 'splain' to do (http://ca.news.yahoo.com/afghan-translators-given-false-hope-coming-canada-officials-20101222-023557-165.html)....
Quote
A company that supplies Afghan translators for Canada's mission in Kandahar may have mistakenly raised the interpreters' hopes of emigrating to Canada, according to a newly released document.

A contingent of Canadian military and civilian officials say International Management Services, or IMS, told interpreters that their immigration papers were being considered — even though not every application was.

The officials noted the finding in a report to Citizenship and Immigration Canada, which they submitted in March after spending three weeks in Kandahar reviewing applications made under a special immigration program.

The Canadian Press obtained a partially-censored copy of the report under the Access to Information Act.

The report says problems arose when an unidentified group or person contacted IMS to verify the translators' work history.

"Complications arose when (blank) contacted IMS, the prime contractor for many of the CF's interpreters and other language assistants, to confirm employment records," the report says.

"(Blank) reported that IMS, staffed in Kandahar by local nationals, informed some program applicants that they were being considered. Given that the list submitted to IMS was only of individuals that were potentially eligible, this likely raised false expectations among applicants." ....
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on September 11, 2011, 19:50:50
The latest:  one out of three applicants make it through the sausage machine....
Quote
Two of every three Afghans who sought refuge in Canada after risking their lives working for the military in Kandahar have been turned away, including some who worked alongside Canadian soldiers during the bloodiest days of battle.

The special-measures program was announced with much fanfare by Immigration Minister Jason Kenney in the fall of 2009 and brought Canada in line with other NATO countries which had already launched similar initiatives.

It ends Monday.

Applicants had to demonstrate they faced extraordinary risk as a result of their work with Canada. Few didn't. Working as an interpreter for NATO forces in southern Afghanistan was akin to having a Taliban bull's-eye on the back of a shalwar khameez.

Stories of night letters, threatening phone calls, abductions and even hangings were part of the job. As interpreters also travelled with soldiers and diplomats, at least six were among those killed during the IED strikes that claimed 161 Canadian lives.

The other major requirement for acceptance was a bit tougher: interpreters must have worked for Canada for 12 consecutive months between October 2007 and July 2011, when the mission in Kandahar came to an end.

But Canadian troops began their work in Kandahar in 2006, as did the hundreds of interpreters who would go on to work for the Canadian government ....
The Canadian Press, 11 Sept 11 (http://ca.news.yahoo.com/program-bring-afghan-terps-canada-ends-most-turned-181220656.html)
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on September 11, 2011, 21:35:56
I am still in contact with my head terp.  He said he has been approved to come to Canada with his wife in about 3-4 months time.  One other chap was also approved, but the others are not successful at this point.  I'm pleased to think that at least my friend and his wife will be safe.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: Sythen on September 16, 2011, 10:44:52
Why stop with the LA's? The ANA and AUP also faced those dangers on patrols with us.. Bring them over.. Heck, when a normal civilian would point out where an IED was or a cache was hidden, find all of them and bring them over too.

Every LA we had (we kept having to fire them for different reasons, so we had I'd say over a dozen) told us the only reason they were LA is cause they wanted to come to Canada. I can't provide proof of this or anything, but really is that the type of mentality we want in our immigrants? How can we expect Afghanistan to flourish at all when we take their most educated away?
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on September 16, 2011, 11:08:42
Every LA we had (we kept having to fire them for different reasons, so we had I'd say over a dozen) told us the only reason they were LA is cause they wanted to come to Canada. I can't provide proof of this or anything, but really is that the type of mentality we want in our immigrants? How can we expect Afghanistan to flourish at all when we take their most educated away?
If you look over the debate running up & down this thread, two philosophies debated are "we have to take them to protect them because they helped us when it was dangerous to do so" versus "if we take away (at least some of) the smartest and brightest, how will Afghan society evolve?"   

Given how unsafe I'm guessing Afghanistan is still going to be once NATO leaves, I'm OK with the former, given how few the numbers involved are.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: Sythen on September 16, 2011, 11:19:37
If you look over the debate running up & down this thread, two philosophies debated are "we have to take them to protect them because they helped us when it was dangerous to do so" versus "if we take away (at least some of) the smartest and brightest, how will Afghan society evolve?"   

Given how unsafe I'm guessing Afghanistan is still going to be once NATO leaves, I'm OK with the former, given how few the numbers involved are.

Yes, I did skim over the previous posts and decided to add my :2c: And I will say again, why stop with the LA's? Do the ANA or AUP face any less danger?
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: GAP on September 30, 2011, 12:50:59
Canada tries to do right thing, fails miserably
Joe O'Connor  Sep 29, 2011 Sep
Article Link (http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2011/09/29/joe-oconnor-canada-tries-to-do-right-thing-fails-miserably/)
 
Sometimes, say, every once in a Fall Harvest Moon, our government steps up and does something that has nothing to do with partisanship or the economy and everything to do with what is morally right and just.

That is what Jason Kenney, the Immigration and Citizenship minister, was doing in September, 2009 when he announced that Afghans who worked and risked their lives alongside Canadian soldiers in Kandahar could apply to be fast tracked for permanent residency status in Canada.

Kenney aptly cast the shiny new initiative as the “right thing to do.” And it was. And it still is. And the only problem is we didn’t do it particularly well and we are not doing it at all anymore.

The program wound down earlier this month. Two-thirds of the Afghans who applied under it were rejected. Asad (no relation to Hamid) Karzai was one of them. (You can read my article about him here).

Immigration officials expect 550 Afghan nationals to arrive beneath the initiative’s banner. My math might not be great, but if two-thirds of the applicants were rejected that means about a thousand would-be immigrants are still marooned in Afghanistan, and itching to get out.

It is a home that is not always particularly sweet for former employees of the Canadian Forces who, by nature of their employment, become marked men in the eyes of the Taliban.

They picked us, the good guys, to work for. The bad guys noticed, and they don’t forget about those who “collaborate” with the “foreigners.” They also don’t forget that the “collaborators” have families: wives, children and parents, all of whom are potential targets for intimidation and retribution and worse at the hands of insurgents.

So, what the heck happened? How could something so high-minded and nice-sounding and generously Canadian be such a sham in the end?

Simple answer: bureaucratic inflexibility. The program, sigh, was terminally flawed from its outset — no matter how good its intentions were.
More on link
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on September 30, 2011, 13:08:44
Makes me sick at heart to think of the Terps that worked for me not getting a safe passage here.  Shamefull.   >:(
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters to Immigrate to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on November 25, 2011, 08:46:04
On the one hand, good on the Toronto Star for advocating for this one 'terp (http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/1092308--interpreter-places-hope-on-canadian-courts) (whose case is being brought to Federal Court):
Quote
Blocked by Canada’s immigration minister and abandoned by the Canadian military he bravely served, a former battlefield interpreter now hopes our courts will rescue him from a Taliban vendetta. Lorne Waldman, a Toronto immigration and refugee lawyer who has successfully argued cases all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada, is one of three lawyers who offered to take on Afghan Sayed Shah Sharifi’s case free of charge. Reluctantly, Sharifi is taking Waldman up on his offer. “If it can be solved without the court, it’s better, sir,” Sharifi told me Thursday from Kandahar city. “But if it isn’t, we can go to court.” Waldman plans to ask the Federal Court of Canada for a judicial review of the government’s decision to reject Sharifi’s visa application. “I think it’s outrageous that the Canadian government is — having employed someone as in interpreter in a situation that any objective observer would know would put him at risk — is now denying him the protection that he deserves,” Waldman said ....
On the other hand, we know the Taliban read the papers (http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,101529.msg1059724.html#msg1059724), so is tooooo much coverage (as they've been pressing for the last several weeks) a good thing?  I know I'm one of the first to complain about media holding back information (especially when not covering one of their own (http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,81167.0.html)), but maybe less is more sometimes?
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on November 28, 2011, 07:54:06
Toronto Star continues full-court press (http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/1093296--give-afghan-hero-safe-refuge-in-canada-online-petitions-urge) to get 'terp into Canada:
Quote
From Africa, through Europe to Mexico, the U.S. and across Canada, thousands of people are joining the outcry against the Canadian government’s refusal to give an Afghan war hero safe refuge. Immigration Minister Jason Kenney says former Afghan interpreter Sayed Shah Sharifi, who was praised for his bravery on the battlefield by Canadian troops he worked alongside, doesn’t deserve a visa to escape Taliban revenge. If Prime Minister Stephen Harper needed any proof that his immigration minister’s harsh stand is embarrassing Canada in front of the world, here it is. By Sunday evening, more than 2,141 people had signed at least two online petitions, building on growing pressure from Toronto Star readers writing letters demanding Harper and Kenney help Sharifi. Lynn Hamilton, who describes herself as an activist blogger, started a campaign demanding protection for Sharifi on Care2 take action, which bills itself as the world’s number one petition site ....
Two petitions out there, actually - one here (http://www.thepetitionsite.com/2/canada-dont-throw-your-allies-under-a-bus/), the other here (https://www.petitionbuzz.com/petitions/canadianpatriotyes).

- edited to add story link -
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Hamish Seggie on November 29, 2011, 12:03:18
Ministerial direction means squat to the bureaucrats.  We've seen this before - Minister Y says something publicly, but bureaucrat X pays lip service to it.

Another example of the bureaucracy over riding the will of a Cabinet Minister.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on November 29, 2011, 12:18:35
Ministerial direction means squat to the bureaucrats.  We've seen this before - Minister Y says something publicly, but bureaucrat X pays lip service to it.

Another example of the bureaucracy over riding the will of a Cabinet Minister.
If the TorStar is to be believed, though, the (Immigration) bureaucrats are doing what the (Immigration) Minister wants.  It's just that they're not doing with the (Defence) Minister may want.

If I were a reporter, I'd ask the Defence Minister the question, "What can you do to ensure interpreter Sayed Shah Sharifi can come to Canada?" to see what he has to say.  Hell, ask the boss of both Ministers, the PM, the question and see what's said.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on February 06, 2012, 22:31:34
If I were a reporter, I'd ask the Defence Minister the question, "What can you do to ensure interpreter Sayed Shah Sharifi can come to Canada?" to see what he has to say.  Hell, ask the boss of both Ministers, the PM, the question and see what's said.
According to TorStar, we may have an answer of sorts.....
Quote
More than 100 Afghan citizens who put their lives on the line to help Canada’s Afghanistan mission are getting a second chance to resettle here.

The Prime Minister’s Office has quietly ordered the federal immigration department to review the cases of Afghan citizens who helped Canadian diplomats and soldiers in Kandahar and Kabul — often at great personal risk — but were snubbed in their bids to come to Canada, the Star has learned.

The news could mean that Sayed Shah Sharifi, an interpreter whose story has been featured in the Star, could get another shot at coming to Canada. His initial application had been rejected, even though his service to the Canadian military won him accolades.

The surprise review comes amidst criticism that the Conservative government had betrayed a promise of Canadian citizenship to Afghans who had worked alongside Canadians on the battlefield.

As well, Harper’s office has removed one contentious criterion that had been seen as a roadblock to many Afghans seeking to make a new life in Canada, according to a source familiar with the file.

No longer will applicants have to demonstrate they face “extraordinary and individualized risk and serious injury” because of their service to Canadian troops, a subjective evaluation that prevented two-thirds of the candidates from qualifying ....
Toronto Star, 6 Feb 12 (http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1127238)
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: ttlbmg on February 06, 2012, 23:29:49
I do find it interesting that one of the main arguments for not bringing these people over is that "we" are taking people away from Afghanistan thatwould be capable of building up their country. I know of, and have heard many stories of, many Afghan citizens that have immigrated to the country, and have then turned around and gone back to the country as an interpreter, still working for their country. Who is to say that some of the men and women coming into Canada won't then have the access to greater education, or education for their children, then take what they have learned and go back to help their countrymen, armed with new knowledge and skills? Call me the wide-eyed idealist. Some will jump at the chance of a life in Canada, some will stay to ensure that their country is going in a positive direction. One can only hope that the "good intentions" of the Canadian federal government will lead to bringing come courageous and brave people to safety, and giving others the option to work on making their country a better place.

There's my bubbly optimism for the day!
Title: Another editorial call for a fair shake for the 'terps
Post by: milnews.ca on February 13, 2012, 08:48:59
Quote
….Members of the Canadian Armed Forces and diplomatic missions routinely rely on local interpreters and cultural guides when deployed in foreign lands, often in environments no more welcoming to Westerners than Afghanistan. If Canada wishes to continue to find willing locals when it sends troops or diplomats abroad, it must ensure that its reputation as a reliable partner remains intact. To do otherwise could endanger the lives of personnel on future missions, not to mention the successful outcomes of the missions themselves. That means a fair deal for Afghans, free of arbitrary cutoffs and needless red tape.
National Post, 13 Feb 12 (http://www.nationalpost.com/opinion/fair+deal+Afghans/6142755/story.html)
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Redeye on February 13, 2012, 18:25:44
I do find it interesting that one of the main arguments for not bringing these people over is that "we" are taking people away from Afghanistan thatwould be capable of building up their country. I know of, and have heard many stories of, many Afghan citizens that have immigrated to the country, and have then turned around and gone back to the country as an interpreter, still working for their country. Who is to say that some of the men and women coming into Canada won't then have the access to greater education, or education for their children, then take what they have learned and go back to help their countrymen, armed with new knowledge and skills? Call me the wide-eyed idealist. Some will jump at the chance of a life in Canada, some will stay to ensure that their country is going in a positive direction. One can only hope that the "good intentions" of the Canadian federal government will lead to bringing come courageous and brave people to safety, and giving others the option to work on making their country a better place.

There's my bubbly optimism for the day!

I had, in my day job as a financial planner, a few clients who were Afghans, who had come to Canada at various points in history, some in the 1980s, some in the 1990s, and a few even more recently than that. They had worked hard in Canada to build a life for their families, but there was something interesting about a lot of them. They were all looking for ways to contribute to the rebuilding and redevelopment of their homeland. One family even returned. They had an immense sense of gratitude for what Canada had given them, and took their knowledge and skills back to their homeland when they saw an opportunity. Taking a relatively small number of people out of the country where there is a reasonable risk to them doesn't really mean they'll never go back to make a difference, it may actually set them up to make more of one.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on March 27, 2012, 18:58:29
I just received an email from my head Terp.  He tells me he has arrived and settled out west with his family.  I am so very friggin pleased to see him safe here and knowing that we have done right by him and his wife.   :nod:
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: GAP on March 27, 2012, 19:06:47
sweet
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on March 27, 2012, 19:09:23
Yes it is, so very sweet to hear this.
Title: More being allowed into Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on April 20, 2012, 22:48:28
Quote
Dozens of interpreters who served as Canada's voice during the war in Kandahar, but then met silence when they tried to immigrate here, are now being allowed in.

Over 500 people applied under a special program set up in 2009 by Immigration Minister Jason Kenney to recognize "Afghans who face extraordinary personal risk as a result of their work in support of Canada's mission in Kandahar."

But two thirds of those who applied were turned away by the time the program closed last September, because the government said they didn't meet the qualifications.

Now, the government is easing the rules, saying they were too restrictive ....
The Canadian Press, 20 Apr 12 (http://ca.news.yahoo.com/afghan-interpreters-turned-away-now-second-chance-come-195712977.html)
Title: One interpreter's update in Canada ....
Post by: milnews.ca on June 05, 2012, 08:07:13
.... from CBC (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2012/06/01/afghanistan-interpreter-reunion-with-canadian-forces-officers-in-ottawa.html)
Quote
A former Afghan interpreter for the Canadian Forces now living in Ottawa has re-established contact with soldiers he helped during the war in Afghanistan.

Mohammad Rahman was no usual interpreter, according to soldiers who worked alongside him. Rahman carried a gun and medical emergency kit and was able to tie a tourniquet and administer an IV.

He can also speak five languages — Dari, Pashto, Urdu, Arabic and English — which made him indispensable to Canadian soldiers.

Four years ago, Rahman saved the life of Maj. Mark Campbell when the pair were caught in a firefight with the Taliban in Kandahar province's Panjwaii district .

"He was my personal bodyguard," Campbell said of Rahman. "He was the only interpreter allowed to carry a weapon and that’s because he was an Afghan National Army senior medic. He brought all those medical skills that came into play to some degree the day I was hurt."

Campbell suffered serious injuries, losing both legs in the field of battle. Rahman worked hard to save the man’s life.

"I put for him tourniquets and also I give him IV before the battle group medic was coming to help me. Very bad place for me in my life," Rahman said of that day.

Rahman — or Froggy as he became known because of his throaty, croaky voice — was the head interpreter for nine different Canadian commanding officers.

Maj. Steve Nolan was another of them, forging a bond while working in 2008 and 2009.

"It took many cups of tea and many meals," Nolan said, recalling how Rahman helped him, just as he had helped Campbell, mentor hundreds of men in the Afghan battalion.

"He not only knew the culture and the language, he knew all of the people in that brigade." ....
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on June 06, 2012, 08:05:33
That's awesome for Froggy and Maj.  Campbell.  I'm sure they are both as delighted to re-establish contact now that Froggy's safe as I was with my head Terp, AJ.  At least and last we've done right by some of these men.
Title: Jobs for Afghan Interpreters
Post by: leftcoastjumper on June 23, 2012, 18:09:47
Hello All,

One of my interpreters from my last tour just immigrated to Canada and is interested in a job translating (Daari and Pashto) for the CF in or out of Canada. Does anyone have any idea of any opportunities for guys like him? Thanks,

LCJ
Title: Re: Jobs for Afghan Interpreters
Post by: Fishbone Jones on June 23, 2012, 21:10:47
I know this isn't much help, but I wanted to say it anyway.

Most of the Terps, we had over there, should be employed teaching our university kids how to speak English.

Thanks for the venue.  :salute:

On a serious note, I had an Afghan gentleman, that immigrated here, start as a volunteer at an Immigrant Help Centre. He was then in my office for awhile on a work program and ended up with a job working for the Ontario gov't.

Little steps, a solid work ethic, a willingness to help always and volunteer work is what got him noticed and hired.
Title: Re: Jobs for Afghan Interpreters
Post by: noneck on June 23, 2012, 21:53:28
Great topic, one of my Interpreters just arrived in T.O. I'd love to be able to steer him towards a starter job, so that he can begin to enjoy the dream! Great kid, left his entire family back in Kabul to come over here for a chance at a better life. Decorated by the Yanks as well for valour.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on July 30, 2012, 19:24:33
Another has made it safely to Canada!!!   :)

Quote
Afghan interpreter arrives in Canada
Published on Sunday July 29, 2012  Paul Watson  Staff reporter

The agonizing years of worrying that the Taliban would get him before he could get to Canada are over.  Sayed Shah Sharifi, a former combat interpreter for Canadian forces in Kandahar, arrived in Toronto from Afghanistan Sunday, ending a more than two-year fight to reach safety in Canada.

Philip Hunter, who worked closely with Sharifi, 24, as a combat medic, drove down from Ottawa with his wife, Oana, to welcome his comrade to the new home Sharifi often doubted he would live to see.  “Good to see you, buddy!” said Hunter, relieved but teary-eyed after waiting more than two hours in the reception area of Pearson airport’s Terminal 1, wondering if Sharifi had hit yet another snag.  “You made it!” Hunter beamed, shaking his head in disbelief after hugging Sharifi tight. “We’re brothers from different mothers.”  “Thanks a lot — to everybody,” Sharifi replied. “You really did a lot for me.”

In the end, after all the incessant danger and fear of life in a war zone, the hardest part for Sharifi was saying goodbye to his parents and siblings, who must now survive without him.  More: Afghan interpreters to get second chance to come to Canada  “They said, ‘You are leaving us alone,’ ” he said, as airline travellers pushed their way past. “I told them, ‘It is for my safety to go there. Some day, I will come back and see you guys.’ ”

Sharifi was also met by a representative of COSTI Immigrant Services, a settlement agency that helps some 42,000 clients, speaking 60 different languages, in the Greater Toronto Area each year.  The agency’s financial backers include the federal and provincial governments, the City of Toronto, the United Way and the Toronto Star Fresh Air Fund.  While he gets his bearings, Sharifi will live at a COSTI reception centre in Toronto, where he will get help finding a more permanent home.  Sharifi is also eager to find a job, and go back to school. He’s thinking about getting a degree in political science.

After Hunter was redeployed to Canada, he tried to stay in touch with Sharifi by email. When he suddenly lost contact, Hunter feared the worst. 
And then he saw his old friend, as courageous as ever, standing up for himself and other rejected interpreters on the front page of the Toronto Star last summer. And Hunter immediately rallied to join the fight.  He knew well what might happen if Sharifi didn’t win this one.

In the summer of 2008, not long before Hunter was stationed on one of the toughest battlegrounds, an Afghan interpreter from the frontline base disappeared after going on home leave.  When his corpse was found by the roadside, it seemed the Taliban had stopped the young man, searched him and discovered a Canadian military letter of recommendation.  “He was found with their letter affixed to his chest with a knife,” Hunter said.

Sharifi worked as an interpreter for Canadian troops in Kandahar from November 2007 to March 2010.  He applied for a visa under a special program that Immigration Minister Jason Kenney set up to protect Afghans who faced retaliation from Taliban-led insurgents because they worked alongside Canadian troops or officials.  Sharifi had tentative approval last summer, but after complaining in a July 2011 story about long delays, and fears that he would be killed before a visa came through, Sharifi was suddenly rejected.

Kenney defended the decision, insisting a three-member panel, which included a senior Canadian military officer and diplomat in Afghanistan, didn’t find Sharifi’s claims of Taliban death threats credible.  As Hunter and other Canadian soldiers who served with Sharifi quietly lobbied on his behalf, the Defence department also fought a bureaucratic battle for him.  Prime Minister Stephen Harper intervened, forcing Kenney to review scores of Afghans’ applications rejected under the special program.

Under loosened rules, the rejected applicants no longer had to prove they faced extraordinary risk, acknowledging the reality that the Taliban considers any Afghan who has worked with foreigners a collaborator with infidel invaders.  Harper pulled all Canadian combat troops out of Kandahar last fall and the final Canadian civilian, an aid official working under U.S. military protection, left the Taliban heartland this spring. 

Several hundred Canadian troops are in Kabul, the Afghan capital, and northern provinces training Afghan security forces.  The U.S. and its remaining NATO allies still in Afghanistan plan to have their combat forces out by the end of 2014, while Washington is expected to leave behind a small contingent to deal with any remnants of Al Qaeda.  But the main fight against the Taliban and allied insurgents will be left up to the Afghan military and police. The Taliban’s northern Afghan enemies are quietly rearming, laying the foundation for what many fear will be a new, vicious civil war.

As Sharifi packed to leave Kandahar, and his family, NATO reported Thursday that insurgent attacks increased 11 per cent during the past three months, compared to the same period last year.  June saw the most attacks since 2010, when the war sharply escalated under a surge of fresh U.S. combat forces that President Barack Obama hoped would deliver a death blow to the insurgency.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on January 21, 2016, 08:51:10
Some of the latest (http://globalnews.ca/news/2452295/i-will-get-killed-here-afghan-linguist-who-served-with-canadians-pleads-for-visa/) ...
Quote
As Canada opens its doors to thousands of Syrian refugees, a young Afghan man who says he risked his life to help Canadians fears he’s been left behind to face a certain death.

Sajad Kazemi says he worked as an interpreter with the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan, but missed the visa process offered to linguists. Now he claims he’s been left behind and hopeless in Kabul, awaiting a certain fate.

“My future is not guaranteed here,” he said. “I know I will get killed here, 100 per cent.”

The 28-year-old recently left his job and spends most of his time hiding indoors, especially after he says masked gunmen tried to kill him on his birthday just two weeks ago. He’s convinced that his days are numbered and is desperate for a chance to reach safety in Canada ...
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on January 24, 2016, 18:12:45
One more a step closer to making it here (http://www.torontosun.com/2016/01/23/thanks-a-lot-canada-for-saving-my-life-afghan-interpreter) ...
Quote
After lots of pain, worry and danger, it appears all James Akam’s dreams are coming true.

The interpreter who risked his life serving with our troops in Afghanistan has been granted permission to come to Canada!

“Pleased to grant visa to James Akan.(sic) Have directed department to move fast on his processing,” Immigration Minister John McCallum tweeted Friday night.

It’s true that Akam, 29, whose birth name is Najibullah Habibi, isn’t here yet. But it’s a stunning piece of good news.

Needless to say, the good news was felt around the world, including in Afghanistan, where Akam’s wife and young son are hiding from the Taliban and ISIS.

And in Germany, where Akam, who served alongside the Royal Canadian Regiment between 2008 and 2011, has for months been stuck in a refugee camp, terrified at the prospect of being sent back to his homeland.

The news was also celebrated in Ottawa, where former corporal Eric Kirkwood has been working behind the scenes to try to save Akam ...
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on January 24, 2016, 18:28:21
Excellent news to read.  I hope that more Terps who want to come here are able to.  As far as I'm concerned, they're earned passage.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Target Up on January 24, 2016, 20:07:34
Excellent news to read.  I hope that more Terps who want to come here are able to.  As far as I'm concerned, they're earned passage.

If you ask me, they should have been allocated the first ten rows on the first "new Canadians" flight to land here.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: PuckChaser on January 24, 2016, 20:28:12
If you ask me, they should have been allocated the first ten rows on the first "new Canadians" flight to land here.

They didn't have an Alan Kurdi to be on the front page of the news. Press coverage = political attention
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: ModlrMike on January 24, 2016, 20:35:40
To my mind they've done more for this country than most Canadians ever will.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on January 24, 2016, 20:44:13
If you ask me, they should have been allocated the first ten rows on the first "new Canadians" flight to land here.
It's not like previous governments didn't have a chance to do more - let's see how this government handles them, even though the "official" program's over.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on January 24, 2016, 20:45:06
If you ask me, they should have been allocated the first ten rows on the first "new Canadians" flight to land here.

Damn skippy.  :nod:
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: hibiny on February 18, 2016, 08:53:42
I heard that Russia sent its troops to the border of Tajikistan and Afghanistan
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on February 18, 2016, 10:17:28
I heard that Russia sent its troops to the border of Tajikistan and Afghanistan
Хорошая попытка, друг - запрещенный!  ;D

Milnet.ca Staff/Milnet.ca Персонал
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on March 08, 2016, 07:36:57
Tick, tick, tick (http://www.torontosun.com/2016/03/07/feds-leave-afghan-interpreter-hanging) ...
Quote
Immigration Minister John McCallum has not only said that James Akam — an Afghan interpreter who assisted Canadian troops for three years — can come to Canada, but insisted he was “pleased” to make it happen.

That was Jan. 22 and Akam is still not here.

Time is of the essence as March 8 is the final day marked on the refugee visa that allows the husband and father the right to stay in Germany.

Akam was in a German refugee camp being transferred to an unknown location. He believes authorities are keeping him in a holding area where they can put him on a plane back to Afghanistan — and sure death.

Even though the minister said he could come, it seems red tape has ensured the process is not moving at the same pace as the 29-year-old’s mounting problems.

“Pleased to grant visa to James Akan (sic). Have directed department to move fast on his processing,” McCallum tweeted on Jan. 22 (https://twitter.com/HonJohnMcCallum/status/690688369874059264) ...
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: GAP on April 17, 2016, 16:44:12
 Interpreter James Akam reunites with brother
joe-warmington  By Joe Warmington, Toronto Sun
http://www.torontosun.com/2016/04/16/interpreter-james-akam-reunites-with-brother (http://www.torontosun.com/2016/04/16/interpreter-james-akam-reunites-with-brother)

James Akam can now check “Enjoy a Molson Canadian” off his patriotic to-do list.

Add that to the Tim Hortons coffee he had after landing at Pearson airport Friday and his phone chat with hockey legend Don Cherry moments later.

The 29-year-old former interpreter who risked his life alongside our troops in his native Afghanistan is getting a handle on this whole Life in Canada thing.

“I definitely feel free,” James said during his first full day in Canada.

We had lunch at a Moxie’s restaurant in Mississauga and reflected on all that’s happened to him since he fled Afghanistan more than a year ago with hopes of building a better life for his family.

Thanks to Canada, he said, “I made it here and now I just have to hope that my application to bring my wife and son from Afghanistan will be processed quickly.”

It needs to be. His wife and five-year-old boy are still hiding from the Taliban.

His brother Nick, also a former interpreter who worked with Canada’s troops in Afghanistan, arrived from Calgary Saturday afternoon. He drove all night from Marathon, Ont., 1,100 km away on the north shore of Lake Superior, to see James for the first time in six years.

The brothers wasted little time before talking about what’s next for James.

“I may be going to Calgary or I may stay in Toronto. We are going to meet with some people on Monday and whatever city has the most job opportunities is where I will likely stay,” James said. “My brother loves Calgary and is doing well there, but I know that there may be more employment here, so we’ll see how it works out. Either way, I’m in Canada and I’m happy about that.”
More on link
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on April 17, 2016, 18:22:14
Damn, that's a good news story to read about.  Makes me feel very happy to see.   Too bad you don't see anything about it on the Communist Broadcasting Corporation website. 
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: PuckChaser on April 17, 2016, 18:45:02
He'll wait a year for his family, when we can bring in 25,000 Syrians in 3 months to fulfill a political promise, instead of honouring a moral obligation to help someone and their family who helped us.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: George Wallace on April 17, 2016, 18:57:38
He'll wait a year for his family, when we can bring in 25,000 Syrians in 3 months to fulfill a political promise, instead of honouring a moral obligation to help someone and their family who helped us.

Your sentiments are felt by many, here on army.ca and on other forums and media. 

The Liberal agenda here is a total failure.  The 25K that they have brought in already have so overloaded the various support systems in place, that the increase in numbers will prove to be DISASTROUS......But that is for that other thread dedicated to that very topic.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on April 17, 2016, 20:47:05
He'll wait a year for his family, when we can bring in 25,000 Syrians in 3 months to fulfill a political promise, instead of honouring a moral obligation to help someone and their family who helped us.
Yeah - it's a shame so many of them were turned away earlier on (http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/rejected-afghan-interpreters-get-second-chance-to-come-to-canada/article4101741/)...
Quote
Dozens of interpreters who served as Canada's voice during the war in Kandahar, but then met silence when they tried to immigrate here, are now being allowed in.

More than 500 people applied under a special program set up in 2009 by Immigration Minister Jason Kenney to recognize “Afghans who face extraordinary personal risk as a result of their work in support of Canada's mission in Kandahar.”

But two-thirds of those who applied were turned away by the time the program closed (September 2011) because the government said they didn't meet the qualifications ...
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: PuckChaser on April 17, 2016, 21:39:12
Yeah, not a single party owns this, we screwed these people as a nation. I'd love to see the "qualifications" they required, its not like most of them could print off a CV or carry around reference letters from Canadian Sect Comd's....
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on April 18, 2016, 06:59:36
Yeah, not a single party owns this, we screwed these people as a nation.
Too true  >:( - the last mob had a chance to do it better, so let's see if this mob can do any better ...
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: dapaterson on May 05, 2016, 11:52:48
Froggy has received his Canadian citizenship.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/afghan-interpreter-mohammad-froggy-rahman-canadian-citizenship-1.3562801
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Journeyman on May 05, 2016, 12:07:23
Froggy has received his Canadian citizenship.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/afghan-interpreter-mohammad-froggy-rahman-canadian-citizenship-1.3562801
If we swapped him for Steve Nolan, we're definitely ahead on the deal.    >:D
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on May 05, 2016, 12:26:19
Very happy to read that.  What the UK is doing is shameful.  UK Deporting Terps (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3570278/Betrayal-Brave-Deporting-Afghan-translators-shames-Britain-says-former-Forces-chief-Lord-Guthrie.html)
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on August 14, 2016, 11:28:51
Yup (http://www.torontosun.com/2016/08/12/feds-must-help-afghan-interpreters-who-worked-with-canadian-troops) -- shared under the Fair Dealing provisions (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/c-42/page-19.html#h-26) of the Copyright Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. C-42) (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/c-42/index.html) ...
Quote
Feds must help Afghan interpreters who worked with Canadian troops

For the brave Afghan interpreters who served Canada with valour, I hate to break the bad news.

But we can’t offer false hope.

It’s not looking good for many of you who want to come to Canada since the Trudeau government says it has no plans to reinstate a special program for interpreters.

Or introduce anything new to replace it.

The e-mail from Ottawa was like a punch in the gut. Imagine how the interpreters are going to feel?

“The government recognizes that these brave and courageous Afghans who worked for us made a significant contribution to our mission, and saved Canadian lives,” said Remi Lariviere, of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.

I just knew there was a “but” coming.

“The Afghan Special Immigration Measures began accepting applications in October 2009 and even though the program stopped receiving applications in September 2011, there was a review of files and the granting of permanent resident status to successful applicants which continued through to 2013,” he said. “Over 800 Afghan nationals, including eligible family members, were resettled to Canada under the initial policy and its successor.”

There are less than 100 still stuck there under incredible duress. I want them all out on one plane.

“Afghans who were ineligible under the Afghan Special Immigration Measures may apply to immigrate to Canada through existing provisions under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, such as the economic or family class,” said Lariviere.

Easy for them to say.

“Those not meeting immigration criteria under an existing immigration class can request humanitarian and compassionate consideration. Such applications would be considered on a case-by-case basis,” he added.

How about every case since the Taliban wants to kill anybody who wore a Canadian uniform!

We should not treat our warriors this way. And you can’t just walk into embassies there or go online at a wireless coffee shop.

I have a suggestion for the Liberal government, which seems to have endless resources for Syrian refugees and countries all over the world. Perhaps, they could appoint someone to shepherd through the final few heroic interpreters and their helpless and frightened families?

“Since the Afghan Special Immigration Measures have ended, no individual officer is assigned to review applications received from any Afghan national who may have worked to provide direct support to the Canadian government in Kandahar, and there are no plans to do so,” said Lariviere.

Hopefully, the Taliban won’t be offering a better deal.

The cost of one Trudeau family vacation could pay to get all of the people we are responsible for here! I would have traded that Canadian terrorist in Strathroy (I won’t say his name) for every one of those Afghans who served the Canadian Armed Forces.

What happens to those people left in limbo?

Ottawa may be closed on this summer weekend but over in Afghanistan, where there have been 100 innocent people killed in August, there’s no day off from terror.

Don’t blame Lariviere who is merely the messenger.

Instead, I am thinking of working to organize a protest on Parliament Hill. But I need some veterans to step up here.

Veterans who served with the interpreters. We got James Akam out of Germany and his family out of Afghanistan because Master Clp. Eric Kirkwood vouched for him and fought for him. Touched by the story, Immigration Minister John McCallum made it happen. We need to make it happen again.

Instead of bad news, we need more miracles.

Scrawler out.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on August 14, 2016, 12:17:22
Shameful, absolutely shameful of both the Conservatives and Liberals to not see the Terps done right by.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: PuckChaser on August 14, 2016, 12:55:37
Shameful, absolutely shameful of both the Conservatives and Liberals to not see the Terps done right by.

Easy fix now for the current government, but there's no photo ops in it. If we can bring 25k people in here in 3 months with a short vetting process, we can get 1 planeload of pers here in a week considering what they've done for us.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: sandyson on August 14, 2016, 22:02:59
The argument that we should not help the interpreters come to Canada because it would deprive Afghanistan of valuable talent is not consistent with Canada's policy of seeking only those people from other countries in immigration screening.  e.g. unrecognized foreign qualified engineers and doctors etc. come here and do menial tasks.
In order to get some of those left behind over here, there will have to be a focus on individuals, families and conditions.  A name--even if coded, can have associations made with it.  A bunch of people on the other hand remain just that: a bunch, gray, without boundaries or emotion.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on September 06, 2016, 06:43:52
And so we continue to wait (http://www.torontosun.com/2016/09/05/help-former-aghan-interpreters-who-served-canada) ...
Quote
They are the forgotten.

Not by us, but by government, it seems.

“It is worthy to mention that we have been receiving life-threatening warnings through insurgents and (the) Taliban,” says Ahmad Hussain Haidery, an Afghan interpreter who has the paper work to show he spent three years on the battlefields in and around Kandahar with Canadian troops.

Now he can’t get anybody in government to respond to his inquiries.

“The reason we have served and worked shoulder to shoulder with Canadian Forces (was) for the purpose of ensuring security and improving Afghanistan,” he tells me. “Our great sacrifices, contributions and commitments have been forgotten and ignored.”

I didn’t want to believe this. I am starting to, though. And I don’t really know what to do about it.

My original approach was to not pester the new Liberal government too much because it inherited the issue and Ottawa has a vested interest in relocating up to 50,000 Syrian refugees. I was pretty sure our small contingent of Afghan interpreters and their families would be included in that.

I was encouraged when Immigration Minister John McCallum stepped up to get interpreter James Akam out of a refugee camp in Germany and on to Canadian soil this spring.

He is now reunited with his family and working and loving life in Calgary.

He’s an example of the interpreters who loved Canada and laid down their lives for our country.

The problem is there are still more that need to be rescued: Some in Germany and most in Afghanistan where they face a worsening situation ...
Since Team Blue didn't seem to get it, one hopes SOMEONE is briefing Team Red that how we treat people who helped our troops on the ground in the past will shape the decisions of those who might be able to help our troops on the ground (or not) in the future. 
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on September 06, 2016, 08:22:47
And so we continue to wait (http://www.torontosun.com/2016/09/05/help-former-aghan-interpreters-who-served-canada) ...Since Team Blue didn't seem to get it, one hopes SOMEONE is briefing Team Red that how we treat people who helped our troops on the ground in the past will shape the decisions of those who might be able to help our troops on the ground (or not) in the future.

I have almost ZERO faith in team Blue Red to do anything other than repeatedly crap the bed, overspend and dither.  I fear they will fail us too on this issue in the end.  (no good photo ops or UN good will to mine)

Thank you, good catch.   :-[    However, team Blue crap the bed on this one too and should hang their respective heads in shame evermore.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: PuckChaser on September 06, 2016, 08:26:24
You mean team red, jjt? Blue already crapped the bed on this issue.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on September 06, 2016, 10:36:38
Sadly, no shortage of bed ******** on this one :(
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: dapaterson on January 29, 2017, 21:05:12
And, under the new US policy, their terps are being turned away:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jan/29/iraq-trump-travel-ban-service-america

Quote
Hayder accompanied US forces on highly dangerous patrols in Diyala and Salahuddin provinces from 2007 to 2010. He was one of the interpreters – often just called “terps” by soldiers and marines – on whom the US war effort relied, not only to communicate with locals but to identify threats.

Now, he feels the US is not interested in drawing that distinction. “I know that executive order [is] just racist,” Hayder said of Trump’s immigration ban.

Hayder began the paperwork for his visa in 2012 and finally got it in 2016. On 9 February, a plane will leave from Baghdad and arrive in Istanbul. Another plane will leave from there en route to Houston. When he exchanged emails with the Guardian on Saturday, ticket and visa in hand, he was waiting to hear from US officials that he would not be permitted to travel.

Hours after this story was published, Hayder was definitely informed by the US embassy in Baghdad that he will not be permitted to board his flight.

By his counting, Hayder survived eight improvised explosive device detonations. Death threats, much as Alkhafji received, came from Iraqis furious that he would work with the US. But Hayder doesn’t regret aiding the Americans, even when he had to move to Balad Air Base – once nicknamed “Mortaritaville” – to go home.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on April 17, 2017, 09:02:26
Here we go again (http://cnews.canoe.com/CNEWS/Canada/2017/04/16/22718154.html) ...
Quote
“Disappointing” and “unacceptable.”

That’s how federal Conservative leadership candidate Erin O’Toole describes the “terrible” response from Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen to an Afghan interpreter’s fear of assassination for serving Canada’s troops.

Karim Amiry, 28, now living in Kabul, Afganistan, served with Quebec’s Bulldog Company of the Royal 22nd Regiment from 2009-11. Taliban insurgents have threatened to kill him and Amiry now wants to come to Canada.

“Afghan Interpreter Karim Amiry feared for his life,” says O’Toole.

The Durham MP — a former veterans affairs minister, a lawyer and a one-time Canadian air force officer — knew what to do.

“I immediately hand delivered a letter to the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship and spoke to him about this case.”

It didn’t work.

“Weeks later, I received a truly disappointing response that indicates he does not take the matter as seriously as his predecessor,” said O’Toole.

In his Feb. 1 letter, O’Toole wrote: “Mr. Amiry, as one of the many Afghan interpreters seeking refuge in Canada, has received a threat letter from the Taliban. I now fear that Mr. Amiry’s life is at imminent risk because of his work for Canada.”

Instrumental in encouraging previous immigration minister John McCallum to bring Afghan interpreter James Akam from a refugee camp in Germany a year ago, O’Toole was looking for similar action ...
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on April 17, 2017, 11:01:08
As I feared, Team Red will do sweet frig all to help these Terps.  Sadly, I am not the least bit surprised at their lack of action.  Neither team has honoured promises made.  I'm embarrassed by them both.  Didn't Mr. O'Toole press the issue when was on the other side of the house?  Making noise from opposition when you failed to do so before is just as bad as those you're pointing fingers at.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: PuckChaser on April 17, 2017, 14:51:53
Tories screwed the pooch originally by just simply not doing anything, but I think its significantly worse when you campaign on being welcoming (and fast-tracking 50,000 Syrians) while snubbing your nose at these folks who did a great service to our country.

Much like Defense spending and VAC, all parties are to blame, but no one has the testicular fortitude to admit fault and fix it.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on April 17, 2017, 20:31:00
Much like Defense spending and VAC, all parties are to blame, but no one has the testicular fortitude to admit fault and fix it.
:nod:
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Target Up on April 17, 2017, 21:11:56
The terps are most likely getting the cold shoulder because it's unlikely that they're future good Liberal voters.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: E.R. Campbell on April 18, 2017, 01:51:48
I suspect that many pose a dilemma for soldiers, officials and politicians. This is, I think, the first time we have seen a situation in which the "qualification" for entry into Canada is that one served as a contracted employee. My guess is that many, even most of the 'terps' would be unqualified for entry to Canada as immigrants or refugees under the existing rules. The question is probably being asked: where does it end? who else might demand to be pushed to the front of the immigration line for some reason or another.

Let's all agree that 'terps' were vital and that they are now in some danger because of what they did for us ... but was their salary not sufficient to compensate them for that? That's what salaries are supposed to do, after all.

I don't have a dog in this fight but I think it is not simple hard-heartedness or partisan politics. I suspect there may be some legitimate questions that should be asked.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: jollyjacktar on April 18, 2017, 08:12:05
Perhaps for future, ER, but promises were made to these men.  Unlike the people sneaking across the border or earlier being flown in in droves, these men served us, undoubtedly made our troops safer and are now at risk of harm because of their association with us and I do believe some have even lost their lives.  Exemptions can always be granted to "qualifications" needed or variations created, the government does it all the time to the rules it imposes.  I don't believe partisanship comes into it at all, if anything it's hard-heartedness and not wanting to see things done (for whatever reason).  As far as I am concerned, it is shameful that we are not honouring our promises made in this instance. 
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Humphrey Bogart on April 18, 2017, 09:07:11
Any indigenous population that supports a foreign power always gets the shaft when the war ends.  Just look at all the African soldiers that fought for South Africa, Portugal, France, Etc  in the small wars of Colonial Succession.  Left on their own at the end of hostilities, with many killed by the governments that came after.

How many Afghans were given the false promise of citizenship while working as agents?  I'd imagine quite a few, we won't know for another 40+ years when the war files finally become declassified and anyone who cares is long dead.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Target Up on April 18, 2017, 09:48:20
These people contributed more to Canada without ever setting eyes on the place than the majority of the economic migrants that cross the border illegally ever will.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Lightguns on April 18, 2017, 09:58:09
These people contributed more to Canada without ever setting eyes on the place than the majority of the economic migrants that cross the border illegally ever will.

Likely than a one third of Canadians as well but neither blue team nor red team has carried through on a national promise. Orange team doesn't care just like the majority of Canadians.  There was a 1000s of Vietnamese who stood in front of the gates of their US embassy watching the last chopper leave that can commensurate.  I would be very leery of assisting a foreign army in my country ever, no manner how much they are the good guys.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: milnews.ca on June 08, 2019, 12:56:18
The latest case (https://www.cheknews.ca/afghan-interpreter-for-canada-during-afghanistan-war-denied-entry-into-canada-567492/?fbclid=IwAR0svacCFWxEprlhpoZp1TVMiwGmlE8pH2OCtahlhQBKFtshIxvrtyDfioU), only this time, trying to move here from the U.S. ...
Quote
Canadian war veteran Micheal Rude who fought in Afghanistan waited for an important arrival at Victoria International Airport Friday morning, but the Afghan man who used to interpret for him on the battlefield never arrived.

“I was sitting in my truck crying in the parking lot,” said Michael Rude.

Niaz Hussaini risked his life when he served as an interpreter for Canada and then the United States for many years.

When the Afghanistan War ended, he and his family were moved to California under an American program to help interpreters

However, on Friday he was turned away by the Canadian government he also used to serve when he was told he could not travel to Canada.

“He belongs here,” added Rude. “He bled just like any other Canadian soldier on the battlefield.”

Hussaini’s rejection Friday is being blamed on the last minute arrangements to bring him here and lack of time to process his paperwork, but he wants to move here permanently and that is being stalled as well.

“Last year he wrote to emigrate to Canada and they denied him because they said he was in a safe place already and that’s a guy who lost his legs for our country right?” said Rude.

Mike Rude isn’t the only person trying to bring Hussaini to Canada.

“Canada can’t let him into the country. I’m just baffled by that,” said Maureen Eykelenboom.

Eykelenboom’s son Andrew was a Canadian military paramedic who was killed in Afghanistan in August 2006.*

Hussaini and Rude were supposed to be in Comox this weekend for the annual Boomer’s Legacy fundraiser named after Andrew Eykelenboom, a charity aimed at helping Canadian troops help others in Canada and around the world.

Just months before he died, Eykelenboom saved Hussaini’s when he had both legs blown off in a grenade attack.

Andrew’s mother says Hussaini deserves to live in Canada.

“We owe him and other interpreters from Afghanistan the right to be able to come and live in this country freely and properly,” she said.

Canada has brought 800 interpreters to Canada since the war ended but many others like Niaz Hussaini are still waiting.

CHEK News contacted Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada to see what efforts are being made to bring Hussaini to Canada but was told an answer would not be available before deadline.

The annual Boomer’s Legacy Bicycle Ride is this weekend, leaving Comox Saturday morning, riding to Nanaimo, the returning to Comox on Sunday.

Boomer’s Legacy has raised more than $1.3 million and distributed more than $800,000 in grants since 2006 ...
More in another local media story here (https://www.vancourier.com/2.2065/jack-knox-he-lost-his-legs-for-canada-but-is-rejected-as-an-immigrant-1.23849016).

* - Andrew Eykelenboom is credited with saving this guy's life in Afghanistan (Globe & Mail, July 2008 (http://v1.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080711.wblatch12/business///)).
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Hamish Seggie on June 08, 2019, 22:53:31
But if you’re a former or current IS player our PM rolls out the red carpet.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: Jarnhamar on June 09, 2019, 10:24:23
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abu_Huzaifa_al-Kanadi
Quote
In 2018, he said in a podcast on The New York Times website that he murdered two people while fighting for ISIS
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: CloudCover on June 09, 2019, 22:24:47
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abu_Huzaifa_al-Kanadi

PM inbound.
Title: Re: Afghan Interpreters, Others Fast-tracking to Canada
Post by: daftandbarmy on June 10, 2019, 00:04:01
But if you’re a former or current IS player likely to help the Liberal party in the next election, our PM rolls out the red carpet.

There, FTFY :)