Author Topic: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)  (Read 10091 times)

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Offline sean m

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Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« on: July 12, 2011, 22:50:45 »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14122175.

The paper accuses both sides of inflicting casualties on the civilian population


For those of us who do not know who Boko Haram is, here is some information courtesy of al jazeera.

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/africa/2009/07/200972913529620235.html

It appears that as the war against terror seems to be winding down in South West Asia, it appears to be igniting in North Africa and other areas of the continent? What are your thoughts on the proper form of action?

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Re: Africa in Crisis- The Merged Superthread
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2013, 08:54:25 »
Nigeria is troubled, again (still?) by Islamist 'militants' according to a breaking news report in the Globe and mail which says "As many as 50 students may have been killed in the attack that began at about 1 a.m. Sunday in rural Gujba ... Most schools in the area closed after militants on July 6 killed 29 pupils and a teacher, burning some alive in their hostels, at Mamudo outside Damaturu."

The culprit appears to be Boko Haram.

The Globe and Mail story links to another, from about a week ago, which is headlined, Why oil majors are fleeing corrupt and dangerous countries and explains that "Nigeria has become a poster child for failed petrostates, with widespread corruption and lackadaisical security. Organised criminals are siphoning off 100,000 barrels of the country’s oil each day, according to a study published by the Chatham House think tank. That robs the industry – and Nigerians – of billions of dollars a year."
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Offline pbi

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Re: Re: Africa in Crisis- The Merged Superthread
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2013, 13:22:48 »
A Botswanan Colonel whom I have known since I taught him as a 2Lt on Inf Phase IV in Gagetown explained to me a couple of years ago why his country (one of the more capable, stable and militarily squared away countries in Southern Africa) would not join the AU force in Sudan. He told me that it was commanded by Nigerians "...and therefore completely corrupt"

Good government is possible in Africa, but one of the first things they must do, IMHO, is stop this endless self-pitying bleating about all the nasty things the wicked colonialists did to them, and why they are just modelling the bad behaviours taught to them by Belgians, French, Brits, etc. Rubbish, considering most of these countries got their independence decades ago, in some cases nearly half a century.

The recent AU decision to refuse to surrender any serving head of government to the ICC for crimes against humanity is just another symptom of this illness (although they might be taking a lead from the US here...), as was the shamefully cowardly failure to condemn Mugabe's history of utterly brutal and corrupt behaviour that has essentially wrecked a once-viable nation and trashed its political system.

I don't recall hearing the Indians retailing that sort of self-pitying tripe.
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Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2014, 19:51:29 »
Countdown to "Canada's doing it because there's oil in Nigeria" rabble.ca commentaries in 3, 2, 1 .....
Quote
Canada will provide Nigeria with surveillance equipment to help locate more than 270 schoolgirls kidnapped by Islamic insurgents who have been terrorized the African country for more than five years.

Jason MacDonald, a spokesperson for Prime Minister Stephen Harper, said in an email that Canada will also provide “the technical expertise” to operate the equipment.

The government responded Wednesday to a report that Nigeria was asking Canada’s help in the hunt for the missing girls.

 During question period, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird said any equipment that goes to Nigeria would be accompanied by Canadian military personnel to operate it.

"We've offered support to the Nigerian government. If Canada has surveillance equipment that is not in the region that could provide assistance to find these young girls, we'd obviously be pleased to provide it," he said Wednesday.

"What we do have a concern is we will not hand over military equipment unless we can send the Canadians who can properly operate it."

Outside the House of Commons, NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair told reporters: “Whatever Canada can do in the way of personnel and equipment, we should do.” ....
CTV.ca, 7 May 14

More on whazzup in Nigeria here (EMM News Brief), here (Google News) and here (Yahoo Canada News).
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2014, 07:28:44 »
Countdown to "Canada's doing it because there's oil in Nigeria" rabble.ca commentaries in 3, 2, 1 .....

And has nothing to do with Nigeria being a fellow English speaking Commonwealth country.

It is more in under the influence of the Brits and US. We have a good relationship, but Canada had Mali and those countries bordering it as their strategic interest.
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2014, 08:33:28 »
More from Foreign Affairs minister John Baird in yesterday's Oral Questions on Canada's commitment to Nigeria ....
Quote
Mr. Speaker, obviously this causes us great concern. We have offered support to the Nigerian government. If Canada has surveillance equipment, and it is not in the region, that could provide assistance to help find these young girls, we would be pleased to provide it and the technical expertise to operate that equipment. The Nigerians have our full support. What we do have a concern with is that we will not hand over military equipment unless we can send the Canadians who can properly operate it ....
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2014, 10:15:34 »
We need to focus on those countries there that do have their act together and help them to continue to improve, eventually they will lead Africa out of the darkness.

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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2014, 20:07:08 »
Quote
As other countries prepare to help find hundreds of kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls, possible Canadian help will have to wait at least another four days.

Parliamentarians decided Thursday to hold an emergency debate Monday on Canada's response.

Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird announced earlier in the week that Canada had offered the Nigerian government surveillance equipment and Canadians trained to use it.

Baird said Canada would not be sending military equipment to a foreign government for its own use ....
QMI/Sun Media, 8 May 14
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2014, 14:19:34 »
Oopsie ....
Quote
Damning testimonies gathered by Amnesty International reveal that Nigerian security forces failed to act on advance warnings about Boko Haram’s armed raid on the state-run boarding school in Chibok which led to the abduction of more than 240 schoolgirls on 14-15 April. 

After independently verifying information based on multiple interviews with credible sources, the organization today revealed that the Nigerian security forces had more than four hours of advance warning about the attack but did not do enough to stop it.

(....)

Amnesty International has confirmed through various sources that Nigeria’s military headquarters in Maiduguri was aware of the impending attack soon after 7:00 PM on 14 April, close to four hours before Boko Haram began their assault on the town.

But an inability to muster troops – due to poor resources and a reported fear of engaging with the often better-equipped armed groups – meant that reinforcements were not deployed to Chibok that night. The small contingent of security forces based in the town – 17 army personnel as well as local police –attempted to repel the Boko Haram assault but were overpowered and forced to retreat. One soldier reportedly died ....

P.S. - Split this off because it looks like Canada may be getting more involved.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 14:28:06 by milnews.ca »
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2014, 07:17:46 »
PM confirms Canadian boots (civvy, cop, mil, all of the above?) on the ground in Oral Questions in the House of Commons yesterday:
Quote
.... Mr. Speaker, the government condemns these acts in the strongest possible terms.  The kidnapping of these schoolgirls by Boko Haram is obviously repugnant to everything that we believe in as Canadians and that most people in the world believe in. Our hearts are with these girls and their families. There are Canadian personnel now present in Nigeria. They are there to provide liaison and to assist Nigerian authorities in their search ....
A bit more from The Canadian Press here.

Countdown to "Canada's doing it because there's oil in Nigeria" rabble.ca commentaries in 3, 2, 1
I got this partly wrong - there's a bit of anti-colonialist spin being thrown in as well, in this case, by the World Socialist Web Site:
Quote
....  The deployment of the Western forces marks a significant escalation in the ongoing military intervention by Washington and its allies in Africa--from North and East Africa, to the Horn of Africa and the Sahel, to oil-rich West Africa.

The aim of this “pivot to Africa” is to secure the continent’s huge mineral and energy resources against competition from China, which has overtaken the US as Africa’s principal trading partner.

The mobilisation of a neo-colonial venture in a country that has overtaken South Africa to become the world’s 27th largest economy has been legitimised by an international social media campaign around the hashtag #BringOurGirlsBack. It received a big boost from the World Economic Forum on Africa, meeting in Abuja last week, where African billionaire business leaders and the CEOs of giant transnational corporations and financial institutions rubbed shoulders.

So hostile is their agenda to the broad mass of the population that businesses and schools were closed in the capital and their hotels and meeting places had to be protected by 6,000 security personnel, including some from the US ....
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Offline Old Sweat

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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2014, 08:29:14 »
This oped piece from the National Post is reproduced under the Fair Dealing provision of the Copyright Act.

Matt Gurney: Boko Haram finally found a way to get the West involved in Africa
May 13, 2014 3:36 PM ET

It takes a lot to rouse the West into action in Africa, but Boko Haram seems to have found a way. They may come to regret that.
 
For the last five years, Boko Haram’s fighters have ridden high, dealing the Nigerian security forces a series of embarrassing defeats.

Their winning streak may have come to an end.

Nigeria missing girls search sees U.S. surveillance, reconnaissance aircraft joining hunt for Boko Haram

A Nigerian government official said “all options are open” in efforts to rescue almost 300 abducted schoolgirls from their Islamic extremist captors as U.S. surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft started flying over the West African country.

Boko Haram, the militant group that is holding some 276 female students it kidnapped last month from a boarding school in northeast Nigeria, said the girls will only be freed after the government releases jailed militants.
Nigeria’s initially suggested there would be no negotiations with Boko Haram but it appears that stance may be relaxed.

Mike Omeri, the director of the government’s information agency, called the National Orientation Agency, said the government will “use whatever kind of action” it takes to free the girls. He also warned that a military operation, with foreign help, was possible.

While the Western world did little more than tsk-tsk when the Islamist separatist group planted bombs and machine-gunned civilians, the recent attack on a girls’ school may have been an outrage too many. With an estimated 300 school girls, aged 15-18, now held as sex slaves — “wives,” in Boko Haram’s warped description — the world has finally noticed what this wretched group of 21st century pirates have been up to. Rallies have been held, politicians and public figures throughout the West are posing for photos holding signs reading, “Bring back our girls.”

And more tellingly, a quiet buildup of Western military might is now taking place — including, it is now being reported, Canadian forces.

In a report for CTV News, national affairs reporter Mercedes Stephenson says that Canadian forces are not just preparing to deploy, but some are there already. This followed a recent announcement by Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird that “there are Canadians who have arrived on the ground in Nigeria who are working with the United States and the United Kingdom to work on the freedom of these young girls.” There are reportedly more Canadian troops on the way, as well, including special forces personnel tasked with a “security” mission that may include hostage rescue but does not, notably, include hostage negotiation.

The details of the Canadian military operation in the region are scant. Indeed, if you’ve read the above paragraph, you’re pretty much fully dialled in on what has been made publicly available. But there is more that can be discerned. It was just last month that Stephens reported on work being done by the Canadian Special Operations Regiment in Niger, which is (somewhat confusingly) a separate but neighbouring country to Nigeria, where Boko Haram abducted the school girls. The Canadian mission there, much of which remains shrouded in secrecy, involved Canadian commandos training Niger’s security forces in counter-terrorism.

Clearly we have an interest in the region, and the means (and willingness) to contribute. Indeed, though this is purely speculation on my part, rather than deploying forces to Nigeria from Canada, it’s possible that some of the early planning work — those first boots on the ground, to echo Minister Baird — could be troops rushed over from the country next door. More forces may, probably will, follow on from Canadian in the coming days. But the earliest steps of that deployment — preparing accommodations, securing supplies, liaising with local military and political officials — could easily be handled by the staff officers already deployed to the region.

Whatever the ultimate disposition of Canada’s deployment, it’s clear that Nigeria is getting the help it has asked for. On Tuesday, the Pentagon confirmed that U.S. Air Force assets were active in Nigeria, with manned and remotely controlled aircraft performing reconnaissance sweeps of the remote, wooded area where Boko Haram is believed to have taken the girls. Senior U.S. military commanders have also visited the region for consultations. British military planners arrived last week to assist local forces. China and Israel have offered assistance locating Boko Haram. All of this is on top of the requests made last week by Nigeria for specific forms of technical assistance, which included a request to Canada for surveillance assets.

Before anything can happen, of course, Boko Haram’s hideout must be found, which is technically feasible but may prove time consuming. After it’s located — hopefully before too many girls are sold into slavery or further victimized by their captors — a variety of choices will have to be made. Should negotiations try to secure the release of the girls without violence? Should a ransom be paid? If a military strike to destroy the group, and rescue as many hostages as possible, be launched, what kind of operation should it be? A Nigerian operation, with Western technical aid and training support, or a foreign action by U.S. and allied forces, conducted on Nigerian territory with the government’s permission?

We don’t have these answers yet. We may not for some time. But it’s clear that the Western world, including Canada, has decided that forcing hundreds of girls into sexual slavery, and boasting about it on video messages, is a step too far. It takes a lot to rouse the West into action in Africa, but Boko Haram seems to have found a way. They may come to regret that.


-  mod edit to embed link to article in headline -
« Last Edit: May 14, 2014, 08:38:36 by milnews.ca »

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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2014, 10:27:06 »
I suspect the only way to win against this group is to go full Roman on them and anyone related to them and we aren't going to do that. The Nigerian government seems to make the Afghan government look like a pillar of incorruptibility. I have said elsewhere that we need a African version of the Gurkha's the West can use to deal with these issues.

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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2014, 10:46:40 »
I suspect the only way to win against this group is to go full Roman on them and anyone related to them and we aren't going to do that. The Nigerian government seems to make the Afghan government look like a pillar of incorruptibility. I have said elsewhere that we need a African version of the Gurkha's the West can use to deal with these issues.
Some of the West already has such a force:

The main problem is that the country this force works for has, to be kind, a mixed legacy in Africa.
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Cdn SOF join search for kidnapped Nigerian school girls
« Reply #13 on: May 15, 2014, 00:42:31 »
Quote
Canada moves in to Nigeria to aid in search for kidnapped girls
Steven Chase
The Globe and Mail
13 May 2014

Canadian special forces soldiers are in Nigeria helping the government search for hundreds of schoolgirls kidnapped by Islamic militant group Boko Haram.

Canada’s contribution is part of a widening Western effort to help find the girls and comes as the Nigerian government now says it’s open to negotiating for their release. This comes amid deepening security ties between Canada and Nigeria.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper emphasized Tuesday that Canadian soldiers are not engaged in combat and will not accompany Nigerian forces in battle.

“They are there to provide liaison and to assist Nigerian authorities in their search,” Mr. Harper told the Commons Tuesday. “The kidnapping of these schoolgirls by Boko Haram is obviously repugnant to everything that we believe in as Canadians, and most people in the world believe in. Our hearts are with these girls and their families.”

News of Canada’s role came as a Nigerian government official said “all options” were open in the effort to free the girls, who were shown fearful and huddled together dressed in grey Islamic veils as they sang verses from the Koran under the guns of their captors in a video released this week.

U.S. reconnaissance aircraft were flying Tuesday over Nigeria in the search for the nearly 300 kidnapped schoolgirls, a day after Boko Haram released the first evidence that at least some of them are still alive and demanded that jailed fighters be swapped for their freedom.

The Conservative government refused to divulge more details about Canada’s troop presence in Nigeria. One week ago, it first offered to provide surveillance equipment and the expertise to operate this hardware.

Canadian special forces troops have recent experience in Africa. Several years back, Canadian Special Operations Regiment troops provided training to Mali’s military, which has been battling al-Qaeda insurgents.

In March, the Canadian High Commissioner to Nigeria was quoted in that country’s media discussing anti-terrorism training that Canada is providing the African country to fight insurgents such as Boko Haram. According to The Punch, a Nigerian newspaper, High Commissioner Perry Calderwood said Canada is “already investigating the techniques to track the insurgents, and we would assist the security forces to combat the threat.”

Since 2009, Canada has contributed more than $500,000 toward counterterrorism initiatives to help boost Nigeria’s capacity to prevent, respond to and ultimately stop terrorist acts, a spokesman for the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development explained Tuesday. This has focused on building the operational capacity of law enforcement and security forces.

In April, after the schoolgirls were first kidnapped, Nigeria’s government initially said there would be no negotiations with Boko Haram, but that stance appeared to have been relaxed amid growing public outrage at home and abroad over the failure to rescue them.

Mike Omeri, the director of the Nigerian government’s information agency, said all options were being considered, including the possibility of a military operation with foreign help.

“At the moment, because all options are open, we are interacting with experts, military and intelligence experts from other parts of the world,” he said late Monday. “These are part of the options that are available to us.”

In a statement late Tuesday, authorities in Borno state said 54 girls in the video had been identified, including four of some 50 students who managed to escape their captors.

“Fifty-four of the girls in the video have been identified by their names in an exercise that involved some parents of the girls, fellow students, some teachers, security men and some officials of the Borno state government,” said Isa Umar Gusau, a spokesman for the Borno state governor.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/somnia/article18653370/

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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2014, 07:47:42 »
And here's one reason Nigeria needs help ....
Quote
The Aerostar unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) acquired by the Nigerian Air Force (NAF) in 2006 have reportedly been grounded due to a lack of maintenance, limiting surveillance operations against Boko Haram militants. Meanwhile the US has deployed a Predator team to Chad to search for kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls.

The nine Aerostar UAVs were acquired in 2006 and 2007 from Aeronautics Defense Systems (ADS), a company based in the Israeli capital Tel Aviv in a contract which also included the supply of unmanned patrol boats to the Nigerian Navy, bringing the net value of the contract to $260 million.

Israeli newspaper Haaretz quoted ADS marketing officer Tsur Dvir and military and diplomatic sources as saying that the Nigerian UAVs became inoperable five year ago due to poor maintenance.

“To the best of our knowledge, these systems aren’t operational. We did receive an inquiry from them (Nigerian Air Force) about spare parts, but it never turned into a deal. I wish it had but now the drones are probably parked in a yard somewhere," Dvir said.

He added that the UAVs, which are equipped with Controp advanced optical payloads, would have been the best tools to deploy in the international search for over 200 Nigerian schoolgirls who were abducted by Boko Haram militants five weeks ago because they have thermal imaging cameras suitable for night operations.

The Aerostars were initially supposed to be used in surveillance operations over oil and gas installations in the Niger Delta which were being targeted by militants and kidnap gangs. However, the UAVs never flew in this role following the 2008 amnesty which led to a cessation of hostilities in the Niger Delta.

Concerns over Nigeria's intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities have mounted of late amid revelations that the country's first indigenous UAV, the Gulma, which was unveiled by President Goodluck Jonathan in December last year, has also been grounded due to mechanical problems ....
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2014, 09:37:22 »
have said elsewhere that we need a African version of the Gurkha's the West can use to deal with these issues.

They had one once, albeit some disagreed with the methods used to achieve sucess

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Outcomes
« Last Edit: October 21, 2014, 14:53:15 by Danjanou »
NASA spent $12 Million designing a pen that could write in the zero gravity environment of space. The Russians went with pencils.

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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2014, 09:43:58 »
They had one once, albeit some disagreed with the methods used to achieve sauces

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Outcomes
They must have been some cooks!  ;)
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #17 on: October 20, 2014, 15:28:46 »
Bumped with a bit of the latest from this mess.
Quote
Suspected Boko Haram militants launched attacks on two villages over the weekend in violation of an announced cease-fire agreement with the Nigerian government that reportedly included a promise to release more than 200 girls abducted in April from their school in Borno State ....
The government's side of the story, so far.
Quote
A senior public affairs aide to the president, Doyin Okupe, told VOA that he does not know how long the negotiations will take but says "everything is on the table."

Boko Haram kidnapped about 270 girls from a secondary school in the remote northeastern village of Chibok on April 14. Fifty-seven managed to escape, but more than 200 are still being held.

The militant group and the Nigerian government agreed to a cease-fire on Friday, after talks that involved Chad President Idriss Deby.

A top Nigerian presidential aide, Hassan Tukur, told VOA's Hausa news service that the militants had agreed in principle to free the girls.

Reports of new attacks in northeastern Borno state on Friday and Saturday raised speculation that the militant group was already violating the cease-fire ....
We'll see ....
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2014, 11:24:53 »
Bumped with some of the latest from Nigerian media talking to Canada's ambassador to Nigeria talking about what kind of help Canada's offering now ....
Quote
.... Q - What support is your country offering Nigeria to rescue the abducted schoolgirls?

A - Basically, we have been looking to identify specific training courses that can help the security force in Nigeria — specifically, the Nigeria Police — and strengthen its capacity to combat and prevent crime and terrorism. Recently, for example, we have experts from our federal police come to Nigeria and train its police on interrogation techniques; we have also provided training on intelligence gathering — information gathering — through the Internet, as an example. We are looking forward to further training in the weeks or months ahead. We have also provided some logistical support to our international partners that are working to support Nigeria in combating this phenomenon.

Q - Is your country offering any support to Nigeria in terms of surveillance and firearms to combat its security challenges?

A - No. The support we are providing Nigeria in fighting against current insurgency is in terms of training and capacity building as I have mentioned earlier. We seek to provide assistance that will complement the support provided by our international partners.

Q - Is there any reason why your government — despite the robust economic relationship between it and Nigeria — is not looking in the direction of assisting Nigeria with surveillance and other military hardware?

A - Essentially, what we have tried to do is to identify where we are best placed to provide the needed support. Canada is not a military superpower, though over the years we have been very active in supporting peacekeeping missions. We have also been supporting the Afghan government to re-establish control over its territories and combat the threat there. We are also playing a role in Iraq. Our capacity is limited on military side. As I said, we are looking for niches that we can serve or to complement what others and our partners are already doing — rather than duplicating efforts in areas where we are not in the best position to provide support for ....
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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2017, 10:23:20 »
Now to spread a rumour that 1 of the 5 commanders is a double agent and let BO screw themselves. That was a common tactic against the CT's in Malaysia.

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Re: Nigeria (split fm Africa in Crisis)
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2017, 19:45:31 »
Now to spread a rumour that 1 of the 5 commanders is a double agent and let BO screw themselves. That was a common tactic against the CT's in Malaysia.


It was also used, very effectively I was told, by Israel against the PLO, and it worked as long as Arafat was alive; he was, I heard, very paranoid and, of course, the Israelis were getting good, solid inside information from someone ... their operational success proved that. One imagines that the PLO command/senior staff meetings were often a bit tense and internal information exchange, which can be crucial to success, was impeded by suspicion.
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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