Author Topic: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games  (Read 34114 times)

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Offline Mr. Bumpy

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #25 on: January 02, 2012, 12:52:21 »
I can see the future of the reserves already.


Never know, may be they can get half a day pay for going online to DNDLearn.ca and do some simulated Pl attacks on their own. Or some other simulation.

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Offline MCG

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #26 on: January 02, 2012, 14:47:39 »
I don't think this is really anything shocking or new - the USMC used the original Doom way back in the early nineties, and helped pioneer VBS1 (which was a heavily modified version of the commercial game. Operation Flashpoint).
It is not even new in Commonwealth armies.  As far back as 2006 the Canadian Army was developing this training capability at the Army sim centre in Kingston ON.  I think SWAT was the sim engine, but it was infantry scenarios with CF weapons.

Offline CanadianTire

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #27 on: January 02, 2012, 14:50:07 »
MCG - absolutely correct. Thanks for reminding me! There was a CF "game" based on the SWAT engine. At one point, it was downloadable/playable by the greater public. I actually had it awhile go, and played around with it for about 15 minutes or so.
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aesop081

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #28 on: January 02, 2012, 15:33:51 »
Simulations and synthetic environment training has been a reality for me for the last 7 years. I have found it a very useful tool ( It was a god-send at CFANS) to learn something before going out there and doing it for real. That being said, fidelity is key. You must do things in the "sim" exactly how they will be done in the real world, otherwise it is negative training (at best, the value is very limited).

Offline dogger1936

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #29 on: January 02, 2012, 20:58:44 »
I was very dissapointed in the amount of money spent on simulation training during one of my senior combat courses.  regardless of what we reported on course critiques we found it useless and a waste of time that could have been better lent to fine tuning things IRT orders. The simulation portion only wasted a good two hours playing a video game that had no practice purpose.

Yet snr crse after snr crse said the same thing....

It's being pushed and there is no stopping it.

Gunnery simulation is an example of excellent use of simulation. SME's can be Cpl's within the regiment to run and set up gear. Excellent aide in between dry firing board shoots; and the live range.

Games to do tactics on the ground IMHO don't work any better than a sandbox talk.

Offline 57Chevy

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #30 on: January 02, 2012, 21:29:03 »
So, joking aside, no one sees any potential benefits in this?

I can see benefits in this new project about creating robots that will actually do the fighting.
 
I think though, that we are a long way from having robots fighting on their own without human input.
 
You must admit that you would be inclined to think that someone who is really good at playing a simulated soldier would
probably be a good candidate to operate one (or more) of the futuristic fighters described in the articles.
 
Or operating any of the other devices and flying machines that can be operated like an "X" Box.
The possibilities are endless.
 
http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,102426.0.html
According to the IsraelDefense website, Israeli defense companies are competing for the nod to develop a robot-based combat solution dubbed "Advance Guard,” which the IDF ground forces are keenly interested in.
 
"The basic idea is for robots to function as a strike force, leading the way in the first stage of engagement with the enemy, in which there is usually a greater danger of casualties."
           
                                        _____________________________________________________
 
From israel today magazine and shared with provisions of The Copyright Act
Israel eyes futuristic robot army
29 Aug 2011
http://www.israeltoday.co.il/tabid/178/nid/22929/language/en-US/Default.aspx
As effective as Israel is at utilizing its human resources in times of conflict, the Israeli army may be on the verge of fielding the first fully robotic fighting force.
Israel's Ministry of Defense recently issued a call for the creation of an "Advance Guard," a robotic vanguard that will lead the charge in future battles in order to minimize human casualties.
The bi-monthly journal IsraelDefense reported that numerous Israeli defense contractors are working hard to meet the challenge.
Israel already makes extensive use of robotics for the purpose of surveillance. Israeli unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are some of the most sophisticated and effective in the world.
But this new project is about creating robots that will actually do the fighting, or at least handle the initial armed push against entrenched enemies.
"The basic idea is for robots to function as a strike force, leading the way in the first stage of engagement with the enemy, which usually results in heavy casualties," explained IsraelDefense.
And Israel is not just talking about remote-controlled weapons systems here. The vision of Advance Guard is on par with any number of science fiction-based descriptions of futuristic warfare.
One of the chief requirements the Israeli military has given to the firms working on Advance Guard is that the robotic warriors (which will NOT look like the image above) be able to autonomously select and engage targets and to coordinate attacks with one another, without human input.
                                      ________________________________________________

Offline GAP

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #31 on: January 02, 2012, 21:46:35 »
You would probably initially see something like Unmaned Advance Guard controlled similiar to present day UAV's...It's probably doable with today's technology....
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Offline Technoviking

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #32 on: January 02, 2012, 22:32:35 »
Games to do tactics on the ground IMHO don't work any better than a sandbox talk.
I would offer that the sandbox talk would be light years ahead of a FPS to talk tactics.

But imagine if you stand around a sandbox that is really a flat screen on the ground.  It looks the same as the sandbox that you and I know and love.  But no more do we get to play with the mini tanks and BMPs between sessions, because they are all virtual.  We could sit around and talk about left/centre/right and then, in accordance with whatever the training objective was, the computer could then run the simulation based on our plan, with all of us watching.   The units could be as low as a troop and as high as an armoured regiment conducting countermoves, or whatever. 

My point is this: the technology is great, but you have to use it and scale it to the level being instructed.  An FPS could be great for teaching certain lessons to a dismounted infantry section or platoon commander, for example (maybe a 3D world in which they conduct their estimate, or give an all arms call for fire, or a contact report, or whatever), but probably not the greatest for higher level tactics, when most of the time you are using a map to do your plan.

Anyway, computer simulations are just tools, and they deserve, in my opinion, a place in our training system.  They just have to be used as such, and not as the solution to all of life's questions.
So, there I was....

Offline dogger1936

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #33 on: January 03, 2012, 02:44:53 »
I would offer that the sandbox talk would be light years ahead of a FPS to talk tactics.

But imagine if you stand around a sandbox that is really a flat screen on the ground.  It looks the same as the sandbox that you and I know and love.  But no more do we get to play with the mini tanks and BMPs between sessions, because they are all virtual.  We could sit around and talk about left/centre/right and then, in accordance with whatever the training objective was, the computer could then run the simulation based on our plan, with all of us watching.   The units could be as low as a troop and as high as an armoured regiment conducting countermoves, or whatever. 

My point is this: the technology is great, but you have to use it and scale it to the level being instructed.  An FPS could be great for teaching certain lessons to a dismounted infantry section or platoon commander, for example (maybe a 3D world in which they conduct their estimate, or give an all arms call for fire, or a contact report, or whatever), but probably not the greatest for higher level tactics, when most of the time you are using a map to do your plan.

Anyway, computer simulations are just tools, and they deserve, in my opinion, a place in our training system.  They just have to be used as such, and not as the solution to all of life's questions.

Or not a soultion to trace 1 2 and 3 in lieu of field trg. i do enjoy the thought of sandbox virturalised. Thats a fantastic idea.

Offline Journeyman

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #34 on: January 03, 2012, 09:34:42 »
....for going online to DNDLearn.ca and do some simulated Pl attacks....
Now there's a harsh curse -- wishing DNDLearn on anyone...for anything other than a case study in "lowest bidder."


[Just imagine if I was remotely bitter about it   ;D  ]

aesop081

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #35 on: January 03, 2012, 09:55:04 »
Not everything on DNDLearn is badly done. I found the Air Force Officer Development program courses to have been pretty well put together. The content was developed by CFSAS but the courseware itself was developed for free by students at Red River college.

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Re: British Army Recruits to Train with 'Call of Duty' Games
« Reply #36 on: January 03, 2012, 09:57:13 »
.....CFSAS but the courseware itself was developed for free by students at Red River college.
Ah well, there you go; there's the difference that adult leadership makes.   ;)