Author Topic: Jeffrey Delisle espionage case  (Read 305343 times)

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jollyjacktar

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #50 on: January 17, 2012, 18:19:41 »
So just listening to CBC Ottawa and they refer to him as a "high level Navy officer"...typical CBC reporting

I heard Scott Taylor  on News Talk Radio 95.7 FM describe, Sub Lieutenant, as the lowest commissioned rank in the Navy.  But of course we all know the depths of his knowledge... :rofl:

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #51 on: January 17, 2012, 18:43:19 »
If there are any gorgeous FEMALE Russian spies with a backpack full of money I am a very high ranking Navy official and my PM function is turned on.

I can tell you about our fleet of Submarines, our destroys and cruisers and their bigger cousins our frigates.
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Offline GAP

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #52 on: January 17, 2012, 18:45:58 »
If there are any gorgeous FEMALE Russian spies with a backpack full of money I am a very high ranking Navy official and my PM function is turned on.

I can tell you about our fleet of Submarines, our destroys and cruisers and their bigger cousins our frigates.

This is all pillow talk....correct?  :nod:
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #53 on: January 17, 2012, 18:49:22 »
By not taking bail, he's banking up time for a 'two for one' at sentencing. Not saying that's his plan, just an observation.

There is another possibility, that he (or others) may be thinking that being held in custody may be safer than being out where persons of ill intent may attempt to bring harm to him.
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jollyjacktar

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #54 on: January 17, 2012, 18:52:34 »
Oh, you mean the packs of reporters who would be baying for blood I mean a story.

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #55 on: January 17, 2012, 19:12:38 »
Oh, you mean the packs of reporters who would be baying for blood I mean a story.

Actually, I was thinking about misguided persons who felt they needed to exact their own form of justice.

Or unnamed co-conspirators who may wish to send a message to STFU.

But, then again, keeping the press at bay would also be a big side benefit.
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jollyjacktar

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #56 on: January 17, 2012, 19:18:59 »
Actually, I was thinking about misguided persons who felt they needed to exact their own form of justice.
Yes, yes.  That's who I meant, "The Press Corps",  CBC in particular.   ;D

Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #57 on: January 17, 2012, 19:50:45 »
Let's also remember, the likes of "Wikileaks" could also be considered a foreign entity.  There are many other organization chomping at the bit to be the new information source, with a lot more to offer than some nations.

dileas

tess

Actually, I don't think so. Its kind of convoluted but according to the Security of Information Act, a foreign entity is defined as a "foreign power/group or an association of foreign powers or a person acting at the direction .... of a foreign power;" a foreign power in turn means "a government of a foreign state/ an entity exercising or purporting act in the behalf of a foreign state" or "a political faction or party operating within a foreign state ....;" a foreign state in turn is defined as "a state other than Canada/ a province, state or other political subdivision" or "a colony, dependency, possession, protectorate, etc falling under the jurisdiction of a state other than Canada." 

In other words, a foreign entity is a political organization (eg country) or some group acting in the behalf of of a foreign government (eg spy agency).

Nothing to it ... clear as mud. 
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #58 on: January 17, 2012, 20:20:06 »
Actually, I don't think so. Its kind of convoluted but according to the Security of Information Act, a foreign entity is defined as a "foreign power/group or an association of foreign powers or a person acting at the direction .... of a foreign power;" a foreign power in turn means "a government of a foreign state/ an entity exercising or purporting act in the behalf of a foreign state" or "a political faction or party operating within a foreign state ....;" a foreign state in turn is defined as "a state other than Canada/ a province, state or other political subdivision" or "a colony, dependency, possession, protectorate, etc falling under the jurisdiction of a state other than Canada." 

In other words, a foreign entity is a political organization (eg country) or some group acting in the behalf of of a foreign government (eg spy agency).

Nothing to it ... clear as mud.

Ahh roger that.

I was thinking it can also be the same as US's Pte Bradley Manning's case.

dileas

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #59 on: January 17, 2012, 20:44:39 »
Ahh roger that.

I was thinking it can also be the same as US's Pte Bradley Manning's case.

dileas

tess

So he's a gay member protesting the Harper Administration's lack of movement on DADT? ;D
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Offline Jimmy_D

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #60 on: January 18, 2012, 08:30:38 »
but what about:

(b) a group or association of foreign powers, or of one or more foreign powers and one or more terrorist groups, or

(c) a person acting at the direction of, for the benefit of or in association with a foreign power or a group or association referred to in paragraph (b);





'Cause technically, it is a person or persons, which may not be at the direction of, but any enity can see that site. So therefore it makes it a benefit to anyone. Does it not?
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #61 on: January 18, 2012, 08:59:59 »
If there are any gorgeous FEMALE Russian spies with a backpack full of money I am a very high ranking Navy official and my PM function is turned on.
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #62 on: January 18, 2012, 09:23:38 »
More on this, reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the Globe and Mail:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/intelligence-officer-facing-espionage-charge-had-top-level-clearance/article2305116/
Quote
Intelligence officer facing espionage charge had top-level clearance

STEVEN CHASE  AND OLIVER MOORE

OTTAWA AND HALIFAX— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Last updated Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012

The man at the centre of an alleged espionage scandal worked in a military communications nerve centre where sources say Sub-Lieutenant Jeffrey Paul Delisle would have had top-level clearance to peruse Canada’s defence secrets.

Sources say SLt. Delisle’s most recent posting, the ultra-secure HMCS Trinity communications centre in Halifax, is surrounded by barbed wire and protected by an electronic shield that blocks unauthorized transmissions.

On Tuesday, the naval intelligence officer accused of spying had his bail hearing in a Halifax court delayed until next week at the request of his lawyer, who wanted more time to prepare. SLt. Delisle opted not to appear in court. “He doesn’t want to come up,” defence lawyer Cameron MacKeen told the judge, referring to the jail cells used by prisoners due in court.

What may be the biggest spy scandal in Canada in more than half a century exploded Monday after SLt. Delisle was charged with passing secrets to a “foreign entity” under Canada’s Information Security Act. It’s the first charge of its kind ever laid and one where the maximum penalty is the toughest possible under this country’s justice system: life in prison.

Details are slowly emerging about the Canadian Forces officer, despite a curtain of silence that’s been lowered by tight-lipped authorities, including the fact he declared bankruptcy in 1998.

The RCMP, Canadian military and the government refused to discuss the case but Defence Minister Peter MacKay took pains to insist the espionage allegations had not hurt the country’s relations with its foreign partners. “Let me assure you that our allies have full confidence in Canada.”

Sources say the Trinity communications centre was also privy to intelligence from Canada’s allies including the United States, Britain and Australia.

Officials at the U.S. and British embassies in Canada were not available for comment Tuesday.

Mr. MacKay on Tuesday refused to identify which country SLt. Delisle is alleged to have been spying for. “I’m not denying or confirming anything,” he said when asked to comment on news reports saying the recipient of the secrets was Russia.

“I am not going to play Clue,” he said.

A woman at Russia’s embassy in Ottawa said the embassy had no comment at this time on the Delisle story.

Sources said the Canadian government is currently conducting a damage assessment to discern how much national security has been compromised.

CTV reported Tuesday night that Canada is preparing a “measured response” to Russia that could include either summoning the Russian ambassador or expelling Russian diplomats.

However, the network said, the Harper government is leery of poisoning relations with Moscow and causing a public spat because the Prime Minister is headed to Russia later this year for a APEC summit.

Little is known about SLt. Delisle, 40, other than he most recently resided in Bedford, N.S., a suburb of Halifax, with a woman and three children.

His myspace.com page lists him as single as of 2008 and filings show a man with the same name and date of birth as the espionage suspect declared bankruptcy in Nova Scotia in February 1998 – less than two years after Jeffrey Delisle joined the Canadian Forces reserves.

It was barely a month before his 27th birthday, according to the record of the proceeding, and he owed $18,587 while declaring assets of $1,000.

He received a discharge from bankruptcy in November of 1998, filings show. The address given during the proceeding is currently assigned to a lower-level apartment at the back of a small house in Beaver Bank, a different suburb of Halifax.

Michael Hennessy, a professor of history and war studies at Royal Military College in Kingston, said the case is really unmatched in Canadian history – if the charges are proven. “For an officer and intelligence officer in particular to be involved in such behaviour is a massive betrayal of trust. It really is unprecedented.”

SLt. Delisle originally joined the Forces as a reservist in 1996 and later became an officer in 2008 after completing a bachelor of arts at Royal Military College.


I have no opinions re: SLt Delisle's guilt or innocence, a judge and jury will decide that, nor the nature of the charges preferred against him, I'm not a lawyer.

I am a bit dismayed by the somewhat "breathless" reporting; consider the first two paragraphs:

1. As those of you who hold security clearances know, no one, not even the CDS and MND are free "to peruse Canada’s defence secrets." DND's systems of information management and control ensure that information is compartmentalized and is "perused" on an often very, very strict "need to know" basis; and

2. It is normal for communications facilities to be "surrounded by barbed wire and protected by an electronic shield that blocks unauthorized transmissions." The wire is absent if the communications facility is, as is often the case, housed within a secure area - like a HQ building. The "electronic shield," often called a Faraday cage is a common thing - there are many inside some buildings - used to both protect information and prevent harmful radiation/interference.

It is hard enough for Canadians to comprehend what has happened without the unnecessary, uninformed sensationalism.


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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #63 on: January 18, 2012, 10:00:32 »
Another topic altogether, but how, and why, would you declare bankruptcy at $18,000?
That's barely a decent car.............
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #64 on: January 18, 2012, 10:11:34 »
Here is a video of an interview between David Atkin (Sun News TV) and Christian Leuprecht, a professor at the Department of Political Science and Economics at RMC and the School of Policy Studies at Queen's University.

Edit: Added proper identification.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 11:23:09 by Retired AF Guy »
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #65 on: January 18, 2012, 10:31:48 »
Here is a video of an interview between Brian Lilley (Sun News TV) and Christian Leuprecht, a professor at the Department of Political Science and Economics at RMC and the School of Policy Studies at Queen's University.


Nitpicking, to be sure, but, that looked a lot like David Akin (an Army.ca member) to me.


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Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #66 on: January 18, 2012, 10:34:50 »
but what about:

(b) a group or association of foreign powers, or of one or more foreign powers and one or more terrorist groups, or

(c) a person acting at the direction of, for the benefit of or in association with a foreign power or a group or association referred to in paragraph (b);





'Cause technically, it is a person or persons, which may not be at the direction of, but any enity can see that site. So therefore it makes it a benefit to anyone. Does it not?

The original start of this discussion was whether this might a "Wiki-leaks" type of thing. Remember that Julian Assange, the man behind Wiki-leaks was acting on his own, not at the behest of any government. That's why SLt. Delisle was charged under Sections 16(1) and (2), and Section 17, of the Security Information Act. If it had been a wiki-leaks scenario, then he would have been charged under a different section of the SIA, probably Section 4.(1)(a).

Just my two cents.
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #67 on: January 18, 2012, 10:39:37 »

Nitpicking, to be sure, but, that looked a lot like David Akin (an Army.ca member) to me.


David Akin

You're exactly right, it is Mr Akin, my apologies to Mr. Akin.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 11:16:52 by milnews.ca »
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #68 on: January 18, 2012, 11:19:12 »
This is all pillow talk....correct?  :nod:

ha!

Does Canada have any spies over in Russia?
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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #69 on: January 18, 2012, 11:42:30 »
More on this, reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the Globe and Mail:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/intelligence-officer-facing-espionage-charge-had-top-level-clearance/article2305116/

I have no opinions re: SLt Delisle's guilt or innocence, a judge and jury will decide that, nor the nature of the charges preferred against him, I'm not a lawyer.

I am a bit dismayed by the somewhat "breathless" reporting; consider the first two paragraphs:

1. As those of you who hold security clearances know, no one, not even the CDS and MND are free "to peruse Canada’s defence secrets." DND's systems of information management and control ensure that information is compartmentalized and is "perused" on an often very, very strict "need to know" basis; and

2. It is normal for communications facilities to be "surrounded by barbed wire and protected by an electronic shield that blocks unauthorized transmissions." The wire is absent if the communications facility is, as is often the case, housed within a secure area - like a HQ building. The "electronic shield," often called a Faraday cage is a common thing - there are many inside some buildings - used to both protect information and prevent harmful radiation/interference.

It is hard enough for Canadians to comprehend what has happened without the unnecessary, uninformed sensationalism.

Unfortunately, if this member had an SA clearance, he would indeed be free to peruse alot of information.  This very act of course would be in contravention to the "need to know" regulation, but there would be nothing stopping the member from doing this.

However, based on what I have read, I beleive this to be unlikely.  It would appear that he was serving as an Intelligence Watch Officer (IWO).  As part of that job he would have had access to level 2 information.  In order to view higher levels he would have had to spend alot of time in a different area.  Allowing something like this to happen would be a gross act of negligence by many others.  Again very unlikely.

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #70 on: January 18, 2012, 11:50:33 »
Unfortunately, if this member had an SA clearance, he would indeed be free to peruse alot of information ...


Then I guess things have changed a great deal since I retired, because that was certainly not the case a few years ago. Each file, physical or electronic, had control of access rules and access registers so that supervisory and security personnel could see who was working on what.

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Offline dapaterson

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #71 on: January 18, 2012, 11:59:49 »

Then I guess things have changed a great deal since I retired, because that was certainly not the case a few years ago. Each file, physical or electronic, had control of access rules and access registers so that supervisory and security personnel could see who was working on what.

To my knowledge, there are access registers (electronic and otherwise) and systems that are segregated (air gaps).  But "Need to know" is too often an obstacle to efficient functioning - as it can be very difficult to assess who needs information.  Thus, sometimes, workarounds are crafted.

Right now I suspect acess logs are being reviewed in detail to discover what all he did have access to.  They will also conduct interviews to discover if password sharing was going on ; evaluate whether or not proper document handling was practiced... in short, conduct a comprehensive security audit.


Management of designated and classified information is always a challenge.  I seem to recall reading about the US Embassy in Iran having massive quantities of paper documents on hand and being physically incapable of destroying even the most sensitive items within the timeline they were mandated to do so (and even that much time wa snot available to them).

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #72 on: January 18, 2012, 12:10:30 »

Then I guess things have changed a great deal since I retired, because that was certainly not the case a few years ago. Each file, physical or electronic, had control of access rules and access registers so that supervisory and security personnel could see who was working on what.

I beleive, but am not certain, that they can determine all of the material he would have accessed electronically.  However, this is something they would now be doing after the fact.

As far as a paper registry, absolutely, there are controls applied to that IF done properly. 
Again though, I think in this case, the worst case scenario would be unlikely.  If I am wrong, I think there will be more then one person in hot water over this.

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CDS's statement....
« Reply #73 on: January 18, 2012, 13:11:14 »
.... on the arrest & charges:
Quote
Following a comprehensive investigation by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), with assistance provided by the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service (CFNIS) and other Canadian Forces (CF) assets, the RCMP has charged a CF officer, Sub-Lieutenant (SLt) Jeffrey Paul Delisle, with offences under the Criminal Code of Canada and the Security of Information Act, including breach of trust and communicating safeguarded information to a foreign entity without lawful authority. This is the first time that an individual has been charged under Section 16(1) of the Security of Information Act.

SLt Delisle is an Intelligence Officer, currently serving in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He joined the Canadian Forces Reserves in 1996 and transferred to the Regular Force in 2001.

The CF takes the security of sensitive information very seriously, and we are ever mindful of the potentially adverse operational and strategic effects that can be created by unauthorized disclosure. For this reason, all CF personnel handling such material are required to observe stringent procedures to protect its security, and are expected to comport themselves ethically, and in a manner consistent with core military values of honour and loyalty.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the RCMP, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Canada Border Services Agency and all other agencies involved for their hard work and diligence in pursuing this investigation.

While the CF remains fully committed to assisting the RCMP and cooperating in this investigation I will not be providing further details on this matter as the investigation is ongoing and the matter is now before the courts.
CF Info-machine, 18 Jan 11
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Offline JesseWZ

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Re: Bedford man faces espionage charges
« Reply #74 on: January 18, 2012, 14:20:18 »
I was just sent a link to CTV's coverage of the event (through my COC no less) and I made the dire mistake of reading the comments.  Angry Face.
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