Author Topic: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.  (Read 64826 times)

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Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #50 on: December 19, 2012, 07:35:43 »
You mean it's not as easy as sticking a Bic Pen in the Cricothyroid Membrane? 

When you know what you are doing, and have done a few proper ones before, it can be that easy.

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #51 on: December 19, 2012, 09:01:49 »
Weird - got those puffers in there but no aerochamber to deliver them with...

BT - the salbutamol and ipratropium are often used synergistically to deal with bronchospasm and airway secretions for asthma attacks.

As Rider mentioned, you need to be able to tailor to needs, mission and lcoation relative to higher medical assistance.  You'd be surprised what you can get into some of the various off the shelf med bags that are out there and how easily they can grow or shrink to purpose (or lack of proper planning in the case of growing).  Experience will teach you how much of what you take and where it should go in your kit...not to mention what you're actually allowed and trained to use.  I remember looking at one of our MO's on the coast one time that was going on a sail, had limited space for gear, and wanted a small hospital with more drugs than a local ER simply because something happened one time and he spent too much time treating instead of evacuating...I just looked at him and asked if he'd ever lived out of his ruck before - he hadn't.  "Sir, you only really need this, this and that...if they're that sick, someone can come get them or you can take them ashore in short order".  There is always temptation to take everything when it really isn't needed.

 :2c:

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Offline MedTech32

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #52 on: December 21, 2012, 19:44:40 »
Every time I get tasked somewhere, I read the OP/Admin Orders, do MY map recce of the AOR and find out if any air assets are available, and then I think about what I will need to bring.  Then I pack my bag.  Then I realize how heavy it is. (We tend to try and pack everything).  So I lighten it.  Regardless of how I pack, my bags are usually 35-45lbs, with water.  I use a Camelback BFM with the Med Insert.

As you can see below, in the last 2.5 years I've had very different taskings.  You will learn through experience, both yours and others.

as for the other part of the discussion.  While in Afghanistan, I did air sentry all the time.  Had no choice, due to manning.  And honestly, I loved it.  And yes our Bisons and then 113 Ambs were armed with C6's, the 113's had the RWS. 

A portion of our mandate as medical pers is preventative medicine.  If I can kill the rat for no good reason other than it MIGHT have fleas or MIGHT bring poisonous snakes around.  Then why can't I start shooting at 200m??  <- Just for arguments sake.

Snapshot:

Ex Trillium Response 12: 90 + min North of Hearst, Ontario.  In the middle of a Provincial Park.  Totally dismounted.  Assigned as the Coy Medic for 56 pers, with 6 plt medics and an LSVW AMB at the entrance to the park about 30-45min away.   Evac to the Hospital in Hearst was more than 90 Min by land.  No Helo extract available.
 
In Afghanistan 2010 : We pretty much had a chopper Not more then 30 min away and my bag was packed for trauma and hydration.  I was all by myself either with the OMLT or RCD Recce usually not more then 8 to 14 pers.  So I was mounted which allowed me to bring more in a 3rd line bag that stayed in the TLAV/LAV, as we were usually out for weeks at a time.  Also did convoy duty for NSE Force Protection.

In Ft Irwin, California During Work Up 2010: I was again mounted with a Bison AMB as the GIB, got tasked out all over, usually on convoy duty or at the coy level. (ex was a gong show, if you were there you know).  We had Airevac at about 20 min after the 9 liner.
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Offline Hunter

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #53 on: December 22, 2012, 18:16:26 »
Circ:
Steth and BP cuff
Pulse Ox
IV initiation set, Saline lock
IV Tubing
2x 500 ml bags of crystaloid
1x bag colloid
Oral rehydration packets


 What colloid solution is in current use in dismount med bags?
« Last Edit: December 22, 2012, 18:35:32 by Hunter »
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Offline MedTech32

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #54 on: December 22, 2012, 20:07:45 »
Currently, nothing.

While overseas in 2010 we trialed using HSD, which meant we also carried NaCl.  Yes we carried 4 500cc bags of IV fluid.  On long patrols I'd pack 6 (an extra 2 saline).

The final study came out last spring I believe (it's at work hanging on the board and I'm on Block Leave like the rest of the CF).  The result was that there was absolutely no difference in using saline over HSD when it came to long term survival rates.  The only benefit was to the medic on the ground, as we need to carry less HSD then Saline.

As far as I know the HSD was only a trial and hasn't been implemented as a protocol as of yet.  Although I could be wrong on that by now.
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Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #55 on: December 23, 2012, 09:05:40 »
As of last summer, the issued colloid is Voluvent.

It's made with a synthetic starch in normal saline.

Apparently it has a reduced harmful effect of coagulation and does not harm the kidneys as severely as previously issued large molecule colloids.

I believe it is still a Surg Gen controlled item, so it's unlikely you will see it here at home much.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2012, 09:13:01 by Rider Pride »
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Offline Hunter

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #56 on: December 24, 2012, 16:12:05 »
Currently, nothing.

While overseas in 2010 we trialed using HSD, which meant we also carried NaCl.  Yes we carried 4 500cc bags of IV fluid.  On long patrols I'd pack 6 (an extra 2 saline).

The final study came out last spring I believe (it's at work hanging on the board and I'm on Block Leave like the rest of the CF).  The result was that there was absolutely no difference in using saline over HSD when it came to long term survival rates.  The only benefit was to the medic on the ground, as we need to carry less HSD then Saline.

As far as I know the HSD was only a trial and hasn't been implemented as a protocol as of yet.  Although I could be wrong on that by now.

Really? Seems odd that in 2010 they would be trialling something that was in widespread use on ROTO 6 (2008-2009).   
Perfer et obdura; dolor hic tibi proderit olim
(Be patient and tough; one day this pain will be useful to you)
- Ovid

Offline MedTech32

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #57 on: December 26, 2012, 14:03:50 »
I could be wrong and ROTO 6 data was in there and I only remember roto 09 cause that was my roto.  I will check on the 7th when I get back to the clinic and will scan a pdf of the study or find the very obscure link to it.

MTF on this Wait Out....
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Offline BadgerTrapper

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #58 on: December 30, 2012, 21:35:12 »
Thanks so much for the information, greatly appreciated. Gave me some things to research over the break. How do you tend carry the gear itself? Different pack? etc. It's pretty snowy down here in NB, so just consider this as me stirring the pot a bit before I head back out to shovel for the 6th time today. Whoever said "Do a job right the first time and you won't have to do it again" obviously never shoveled a Canadian driveway. - BadgerTrapper  :cdn:

Offline MedTech32

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Re: Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.
« Reply #59 on: January 07, 2013, 11:19:09 »
Ok,

Here is the link to the official document:

http://pubs.drdc-rddc.gc.ca/BASIS/pcandid/www/engpub/DDW?W%3Dadddate+ge+'20111001'+sort+by+adddate+descend%26M%3D25%26K%3D535477%26R%3DN%26U%3D1

and I will attach a .pdf of the Executive Summary,

Turns out, I was mistaken.  The dataset is for 2006-2009 and publised in 2010.  Not sure why we were told to carry both sets, if the study was completed.  Interesting results though.


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Offline jolem123

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army medical technician
« Reply #60 on: September 20, 2017, 14:03:19 »
hi, does medical technician , when they are on the field when deployed are fighting with the infantry soldier like a combat medic?

Offline mariomike

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« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 14:12:10 by mariomike »
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Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: army medical technician
« Reply #62 on: September 20, 2017, 14:12:52 »
hi, does medical technician , when they are on the field when deployed are fighting with the infantry soldier like a combat medic?

While the infantry soldier is trying to *close with and destroy the enemy*, the medic could be along side them but not there for the same purpose.  Think of them firing their weapon more along the line of "defending their patients".
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