Author Topic: Constructive Criticism  (Read 15665 times)

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Offline Old Sweat

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Re: Constructive Criticism
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2013, 06:34:52 »
Let me second FJAG's comments. I joined as a gunner in 1957 and finally hung up my kit in 1994 as a lieutenant colonel. Believe me, I heard all your complaints (and made some of them myself) when I was serving in the ranks 1958-1960. The regiment had served in Korea 1953-1954 and Germany 1955-1957 and then found itself in Petawawa without an operational role. Back then shiny boots and knife-edged creases on the battledress trousers were accepted as the mark of a good soldier, physical fitness was ignored, quarters inspections were common place and training was something we did in the May-July time frame. Our battery commander, who was a pre-1939 regular and a graduate of RMC with extensive operational service in the Second World War, was an incompetent fool who would not have lasted 30 seconds in one of today's regiments.

Retention virtually did not happen, at least in the junior ranks. The vast majority of the young gunners who had signed up for three years left at the end of their enlistment. There was some wastage among the junior NCOs while the sergeants and above realized they had found a home to wait for retirement which did not require much thought or effort on their part. There were exceptions, and they were an inspiration to all they met.

In an army that has transitioned to peace there will be a lot of odd things happening as the organization comes down off its high. In my opinion the world is too unstable for the CF to wait too long before another mission comes along, no matter what the government would like to see.

Offline GnyHwy

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Re: Constructive Criticism
« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2013, 09:09:56 »
Potential solution, recruit officers from within the ranks, minimum rank of cpl so that they understand the inner workings before they go on to be in a position of power. Have people assessed by both highers and peers annually.


We do both of these things.  To suggest that it be the normal progression is not possible.  Os, by virtue of their education have proved their ability to comprehend complex information or problems.  Is that true for all cases?  No, of course not, but many Snr NCMs will tell you that once they reach Sgt or WO and they have to dive into the extensive OP Os, that it can be pretty overwhelming (if they are actually reading it and do the analysis).

Being assessed by your peers happens indirectly in the sense that "do the troops/peers listen to you" when you're put in charge.  Being a Cpl in charge of other Cpls is difficult, and it is a tell tale sign if a person has what it takes.

Or lets say mod6 for instance, they micro managed every minute of our life. But on a leadership course should you not maybe make them take responsibility for themselves as they will be responsible for otheres. Let them be their own best friend or worst enemy.


This one is simple, and although my PLQ was almost 20 years ago, one of the strongest memories I have of it relates to your point.  There were a few of us that were considered by others to be getting away with murder, while the others were being "punished" or "micromanaged".  The simple answer to this was that we were taking charge, and not waiting to be told what to do.  The majority of the time that we made a decision (that wasn't absurd), the staff let it go; if at least out of morbid curiosity. 

Believe me, the staff do not want to have to babysit.  It is a huge pain in the ***.  The exceptions are the few douchebags that are on a power trip, but thosee guys get weeded out eventually.

Establish a training value vs cost ratio aka the suggestion I gave about maybe jumping and doing a mini ex with it.

This is done all the time.  Mostly when the troops are sitting around wondering why they can't go home, is when O Gps, or ICs are in their office pounding out the staff work that needs to be done to make it happen.  Something you left out, that is more valuable than money is time.  Trying to coordinate all the moving parts within the Regt/Btln, and with other units can prove difficult.  Combined arms training is considered by most to be the most valuable training, but unfortunately it is the most difficult to coordinate; not necessarily because of money, but mostly because of time coordination.

I also suggested maybe progressing forward instead of reverting back into that known comfort zone. Eg not doing company night live then 2 weeks later doing pairs dry. Or maybe not always doing a frontal.

Once again, time coordination is a factor.  If the Coy range is available now, but not later, then maybe you need to do training bass ackwards.  Troops shouldn't underestimate the importance of the default setting, and basics, and it is up to ICs to make them understand that.  They are what keeps you going in the most severe and stressful conditions. 

Being a football fan, I like to think of it as keeping it simple, and weighing your options in order to get the most gain with the least amount of risk.  Google game theory to see what I mean.  Some person take this to a negative extreme and try to remove all risk, which either isn't possible or doesn't produce any positive results. 

If you could do the same play or slight variations of it over and over again and get 4 yards a play, you are unstoppable.  When you go for the trick play, you may get a big payoff, but it also may end in catastrophe as well.  Playing it too safe i.e. not doing a frontal at all, produces no results, but going deep is too risky; especially when you are responsible for actual lives.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2013, 09:15:28 by GnyHwy »

Offline UnwiseCritic

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Re: Constructive Criticism
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2013, 17:11:19 »
I understand the football analogy, but if it comes down to a trick play. Don't you want to have at least practiced it a couple times. Too minimize the risk associated with it? Sometimes a trick is required especially when playing against a team that learns quickly and then learns to counter said plays.
"He who hates correction is stupid!"

Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Constructive Criticism
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2013, 17:16:28 »
:nod:

Too long, didn't read.....   ::)

Didn't read the original post, but I found some of the follow-up posts interesting.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2013, 17:32:22 by Retired AF Guy »
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Offline 57Chevy

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Re: Constructive Criticism
« Reply #29 on: February 23, 2013, 19:55:24 »
I understand the football analogy, but if it comes down to a trick play. Don't you want to have at least practiced it a couple times. Too minimize the risk associated with it? Sometimes a trick is required especially when playing against a team that learns quickly and then learns to counter said plays.

I played football in highschool and I can assure you that we did the safety blitz only once during the entire year.
We practiced the blitz a number of times and played it against a superior team. We gained a few yards for a 1st down.



* but we lost the game anyway  :nod:
« Last Edit: February 23, 2013, 20:07:28 by 57Chevy »