Author Topic: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'  (Read 104474 times)

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #50 on: July 20, 2014, 22:41:16 »
Meanwhile, the big 'un is just around the corner...


What Are the Chances of a  Devastating Pandemic Occurring in the Next 50 Years?

Fairly likely.

Larry Brilliant discussed this issue during a 2006 TED talk. In the talk, he said that he had done a study with top epidemiologists. In that study, 90% of them said they thought there would be a pandemic within their children's or grandchildren's lifetimes, where:
•1 billion people would get sick
•165 million would die
•There would be a global recession and depression
•and there would be $1-3 trillion cost to the economy

And it's easy to see why. There are a few facets of modern society that make a devastating pandemic not only possible, but likely.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/quora/what-are-the-chances-of-a_b_3839785.html
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #51 on: July 23, 2014, 11:44:14 »
World's largest aquatic insect specimen reportedly found in China

What appears to be the world's largest flying aquatic insect was discovered earlier this month in China's Sichuan province, officials there say.

According to the Insect Museum of West China, an expedition to the outskirts of Chengdu in mid-July returned dobsonflies with 8.3-inch wingspans and "giant snake-like fangs." Previously, the largest-known aquatic insect was the South American helicopter damselfly, which had a wingspan measuring 7.5 inches.

More at link




 :o   :o 
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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #52 on: July 23, 2014, 14:41:52 »
Go Pork Scratchings!


Health myths busted: Can too much sleep kill you and is popcorn is good for you?

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/health-myths-busted-can-much-3902339#ixzz38Jnv0YHL
Follow us: @DailyMirror on Twitter | DailyMirror on Facebook


http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/health-myths-busted-can-much-3902339

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Offline Thucydides

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #53 on: August 01, 2014, 06:40:05 »
People with power and far too much time on their hands:

http://online.wsj.com/articles/offices-adopt-safety-protocols-meant-for-the-field-1406515193

Quote
Safety Cops Patrol the Office For High Heels
Companies Move Mandates Indoors; 'Avoid Bread'

By RACHEL FEINTZEIG and ALEXANDRA BERZON CONNECT
July 27, 2014 10:39 p.m. ET

For decades, companies have used films and videos to promote workplace safety. Now employers are taking them to the next level.
Kyle Bennett and his colleagues recently filled out cards issued by their employer describing the safety risks of a certain regular midday activity. "Walk across the street, enter restaurant, sit down, eat meal," one wrote, breaking down the task at hand.

So it goes for employees at mining giant Rio Tinto's Northern Utah operations—where all workers, including those like Mr. Bennett who works in a suburban office park outside Salt Lake City—must fill out cards analyzing the safety of their daily routines.

Safety awareness is serious business at workplaces such as construction sites, food manufacturing plants, mines and oil rigs, where equipment failures or other lapses can result in tragic accidents. For an employee in Rio Tinto's Utah copper mine, the mandate to document safety concerns might mean jotting down the least dangerous way of moving 1,700-ton electric shovels.

But now field-inspired safety protocols are migrating to the office, where hazards include dripping umbrellas, the height of high heels and hot cups of coffee.

At Chevron Corp. CVX -2.48%  , any worker at the company's San Ramon, Calif., headquarters can halt an activity he or she deems dangerous by whipping out a small white "stop work" card. Workers take the authority seriously; filming for a safety training video stopped when an employee noticed props scattered on the ground and invoked that power.

At the U.S. arm of food and beverage company Nestlé SA, NESN.VX -1.10% employees begin meetings by checking for hazards, like computer cords that can cause tripping, and reviewing emergency exit protocol. Workers are also expected to spot two safety incidents each month—such as someone holding elevator doors open.

At a company event held at a hotel, an assembled crowd of Nestlé workers audibly gasped when a hotel employee jumped up onto the stage instead of using an adjacent staircase.

"Everyone went 'Whoa,' " said Joanne Crawford, a marketing director in the company's Glendale, Calif., office. The chief executive of Nestlé USA made the worker leave the stage and ascend the correct way.

Safety-minded employees of Exxon Mobil Corp. XOM -4.17%  recently camped out near two stairways in the firm's Irving, Texas, headquarters to observe who held the handrails while going up and down, who carried too many items or ones too large, who was using their mobile phones and who was in a rush. The workers, members of a company safety and wellness committee, mostly just recorded the incidents, for fear they might startle someone and cause an injury.

"We will intervene if we can do so safely," said Glenn Murray, who coordinates the company's safety programs.

Corporate safety consultants and executives point out that strict rules for office safety can reduce injuries, cut down on workers' comp costs, make employees more aware of the dangers their colleagues in the field are facing and promote teamwork.

Yet worker-safety advocates say that not all office-safety programs represent the best use of resources.

"I don't really need some corporate executive to tell me to look both ways before I cross the street," said Mike Wright, who directs health and safety for the United Steelworkers, which represents workers in mines, steel plants, oil refineries and many other manufacturing plants. "I think a lot of it is just distraction."

Charles Bradford, a metals industry analyst, said that when he meets with investor-relations staff at large metals firms, they often start the meeting with a safety talk that sometimes strikes him as "a bit much."

"You have to assume that the people attending the meeting are smart enough to know where the exits are," Mr. Bradford said.

Fatalities and serious injuries occasionally occur in offices. Yet compared with other industries, the life of the office worker is deemed such a relatively safe one that government regulators don't step foot in to investigate unless called in due to a complaint or accident.

"I have never heard a vice president of finance say, 'I have to get my area together because OSHA might come in to inspect us,' " said Steve Simon, a safety consultant in California.


Skanska employees in New York do 'stretch and flex' exercises designed to prevent soft-tissue injuries. Andrew Spear for The Wall Street Journal
At the U.S. arm of Swedish builder Skanska SKA-B.SK -1.39%  AB, 8,300 workers at construction sites begin every morning with about five minutes of "stretch and flex," designed to prevent soft-tissue injuries like sprains. But the 1,400 employees who work at the company's corporate offices also do lunges and stretch their triceps—some in high heels or ties.

On a recent morning in New York, at the company's Empire State Building office, about 65 workers gathered in a hallway by the elevators and launched into quad stretches.

Margaret Billy Quandt—clad in pearls, a coral-colored dress and peep-toe stilettos—said she was initially taken aback by the exercise when she joined the company.

"I was like 'What is going on?'" said Ms. Quandt, a senior human resources director. Since then, she said, the company's safety focus has inspired her to rearrange her desk and multitask less.

"Our job site rules are the same as office rules," said Skanska USA Inc. CEO Mike McNally. While he initially thought the daily stretching exercise was "corny," he said he now finds it fun. It gets office workers out of their desk chairs, he said, and shows them the company cares about them.

At Rio Tinto's Kennecott copper mining subsidiary in Utah, employees have to put a wedge under the tires of company-owned vehicles, designed to stop them from rolling, even on flat ground. That written company policy stems from federal regulations for mine areas. The company decided to apply the rules across the board, said Mr. Bennett, Rio Tinto Kennecott's spokesman.

All workers are also required to fill out the daily safety tracking cards. The idea is to ensure that safety awareness permeates the entire company from the mine to the executive suite, Mr. Bennett said. He said that as an employee, "It's really critical for me to understand the culture and how I can contribute to it."

For some office workers, though, finding a hazard to write up every day at the office can be a challenge. Some resort to rehashing procedures for unplanned emergencies, such as earthquakes. Mr. Bennett says he sometimes tracks his lunch treks, noting on his safety card how he will control for every possible threat on the way, from flights of stairs to the busy intersection outside the office.

One of his colleagues recently wrote that to mitigate "choking hazards" during a lunch, she would "take small bites; avoid bread."

—John W. Miller contributed to this article.

Write to Rachel Feintzeig at rachel.feintzeig@wsj.com and Alexandra Berzon at alexandra.berzon@wsj.com
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline stealthylizard

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #54 on: August 01, 2014, 10:58:41 »
That's the new reality of the civilian work force.  I have about 100 cards pre-written about the potential hazard of slips, trips and falls when walking.  There is only so much job safety analysis you can do about walking through farmer's fields for 3 years.

Offline cupper

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #55 on: August 01, 2014, 11:38:32 »
Someone want to explain how holding open an elevator door is a safety hazard?

There is a reason for the safety system that causes the door to not close or reopen when it encounters an object blocking it's path.

I know from personal experience that there can be some really stupid implementations of policy. Was written up on a job site a few years ago for not having my hard hat on. The fact that I took it off because I was looking out over the face of a 30' high retaining wall to take a photograph, and didn't want it to fall and hit the workers below didn't seem to be sufficient enough reason for the safety officer who happened to be there. After a 30 minute discussion in the Project Managers office we came to an amicable agreement that the report would be appropriately filled in the trash and that the safety officer should focus on actual safety violations such as the broken safety rail 10' from where I was taking the photo.
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

There is no God, and life is just a myth.

"He who drinks, sleeps. He who sleeps, does not sin. He who does not sin, is holy. Therefore he who drinks, is holy."

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Offline stealthylizard

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #56 on: August 01, 2014, 12:32:48 »
Safety system could malfunction. 

Safety isn't about what "will" happen, it's about what "could" happen, or has happened because of someone being complacent or a general moron.  It's also why companies tend to hire people for safety that haven't been in the industry.  Everything to them is a potential safety hazard, even if the odds of it happening are astronomical.  The more time you spend on a job, the less hazardous everything starts to look.

Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #57 on: August 01, 2014, 18:26:52 »
Safety system could malfunction.

Happened about 20 years ago in the Lord Elgin in Ottawa. Brit tourist got caught  between the doors on the elevator and ended up getting decapitated.
"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

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Offline PMedMoe

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #58 on: August 28, 2014, 11:34:54 »
Check your unused spare rooms...   :o

Enormous wasps' nest covers bed in UK woman's spare bedroom

A gigantic nest made by 5000 wasps was the last thing a man expected to find on a bed in a rarely-used spare bedroom in his mother's home.

In order to make their nearly one-metre wide by about 45-centimetre nest over up to three months, the insects chewed through the single bed's mattress and pillows.

The woman, who lives in the Winchester home alone, had not been in the spare bedroom during this time.

.....

"In 45 years I have never seen anything like it. There must have been 5000 wasps. It's amazing that the woman didn't realise she was living with them."

More at link



Couldn't she hear them??
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
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Offline theforcewithin

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #59 on: August 28, 2014, 11:52:16 »
Check your unused spare rooms...   :o

Enormous wasps' nest covers bed in UK woman's spare bedroom

A gigantic nest made by 5000 wasps was the last thing a man expected to find on a bed in a rarely-used spare bedroom in his mother's home.

In order to make their nearly one-metre wide by about 45-centimetre nest over up to three months, the insects chewed through the single bed's mattress and pillows.

The woman, who lives in the Winchester home alone, had not been in the spare bedroom during this time.

.....

"In 45 years I have never seen anything like it. There must have been 5000 wasps. It's amazing that the woman didn't realise she was living with them."

More at link



Couldn't she hear them??

I wouldn't even know how to start cleaning that up...

I guess at least it wasn't a nest of snakes slithering around the room. :S

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #60 on: August 29, 2014, 12:48:26 »
Incurable, potentially pandemic-like, diseases always kind of creeped me out:

The Ebola virus could eventually infect 20,000 people and the actual number of current cases may already be two to four times higher than reported, the World Health Organization says.

The United Nations health agency released a road map on Thursday with its $490-million US plan to try to contain the outbreak in nine months.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/ebola-outbreak-cases-could-exceed-20-000-who-says-1.2749071
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Robert0288

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #61 on: August 29, 2014, 14:59:19 »
That and the entire bleeding from the inside out through every orifice.

Offline theforcewithin

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #62 on: August 29, 2014, 19:35:41 »
Incurable, potentially pandemic-like, diseases always kind of creeped me out:

The Ebola virus could eventually infect 20,000 people and the actual number of current cases may already be two to four times higher than reported, the World Health Organization says.

The United Nations health agency released a road map on Thursday with its $490-million US plan to try to contain the outbreak in nine months.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/ebola-outbreak-cases-could-exceed-20-000-who-says-1.2749071

Ok, yeah, this is pretty damn creepy. I'd take that bed of wasps over a pandemic.

In our day and age, I wonder if it's even possible to contain something like this and how accurate the estimate could/will be. Who knows how many people have already "slipped under the radar" and moved from the main "infected area"...

It's apparently getting worse: http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/ebola-spreads-to-senegal-after-student-evades-health-monitors-1.2750314

Offline cupper

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #63 on: August 29, 2014, 21:25:09 »
If you really want to be afraid, read this.

Scary for me, I live only 20 miles from the lab in question.
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

There is no God, and life is just a myth.

"He who drinks, sleeps. He who sleeps, does not sin. He who does not sin, is holy. Therefore he who drinks, is holy."

Let's Go CAPS!

Offline cupper

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #64 on: August 29, 2014, 21:58:34 »
The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2014/08/29/344257046/the-co-discoverer-of-ebola-never-imagined-an-outbreak-like-this

Quote
As a young scientist in Belgium, Peter Piot was part of a team that discovered the Ebola virus in 1976.

He took his first trip to Africa to investigate this mysterious disease. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, he met people who had contracted it. "I'll never forget the glazed eyes, the staring and the pain ... this type of expression in the eyes ... telling me I'm going to die," says Piot. "That I'll never forget."

Piot went on to study AIDS in the 1980s and became founding executive director of the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS. He is now director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

In an interview with NPR's Melissa Block, Piot tells the story of Ebola's discovery: He and his colleagues were looking at samples from a Belgian nun who had died of a disease in Congo. The question he thought he was trying to answer: Was it yellow fever?

Instead it was a new disease. "I was excited," he recalls, "because one of the dreams of any microbiologists is to discover a new pathogen. That was very excited. But I certainly didn't think it would develop into such a human tragedy as we're seeing now in West Africa."

"This is absolutely unexpected and unprecedented," he says. "We have here a situation where Ebola finds an enormously fertile ground in very poor countries with very dysfunctional health systems," he says. "A country like Liberia in 2010 only 51 doctors for the whole country."

He hopes there will never be another outbreak like this one. "I hope that this is the last epidemic where all we have [as treatment] is isolation of patients and quarantines and some supportive care, and we don't have stockpiles of vaccines and therapies."

There is potential for Ebola to spread to neighboring African countries, he says, but he is not worried about "high-income countries."

"Our basic hospital hygiene is such that it is highly unlikely it would give rise to epidemics," he says.

But he does warn that we are moving into a future where health risks will increase: "We'll have to be prepared that in a globalized world, these viruses will spread much faster than ever before."
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

There is no God, and life is just a myth.

"He who drinks, sleeps. He who sleeps, does not sin. He who does not sin, is holy. Therefore he who drinks, is holy."

Let's Go CAPS!

Offline PMedMoe

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #65 on: August 29, 2014, 22:28:44 »
If you really want to be afraid, read this.

Scary for me, I live only 20 miles from the lab in question.

Excellent book.  I lent it to someone and never got it back.   :(
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
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Offline cupper

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #66 on: September 19, 2014, 19:36:57 »
Remember these guys?

Fear this:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/10/1025_021025_GiantHornets.html

Giant.  Flesh melting.  Killer Wasps.

Google the image for Japanese wasp as well and feel the horror.

It seems that the Japanese Honey Bee has developed defenses against them. Murder Squishing.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2014/09/19/349645420/-murdersquishing-them-to-death-how-little-bees-take-on-enormous-hornets?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20140919

Here is a video of the process in action. WOW!

http://youtu.be/TkIvM0dKhS8
« Last Edit: September 19, 2014, 19:45:22 by cupper »
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

There is no God, and life is just a myth.

"He who drinks, sleeps. He who sleeps, does not sin. He who does not sin, is holy. Therefore he who drinks, is holy."

Let's Go CAPS!

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #67 on: September 20, 2014, 00:35:07 »
Anyone within site of a water cooling tower? Anyone?

The Chernobyl disaster (Ukrainian: Чорнобильська катастрофа, Chornobylska Katastrofa – Chornobyl Catastrophe; also referred as Chernobyl or the Chornobyl accident) was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine (then officially the Ukrainian SSR), which was under the direct jurisdiction of the central authorities of the Soviet Union. An explosion and fire released large quantities of radioactive particles into the atmosphere, which spread over much of the western USSR and Europe.

The Chernobyl disaster is the worst nuclear power plant accident in history in terms of cost and casualties,[1] and is one of only two classified as a level 7 event (the maximum classification) on the International Nuclear Event Scale (the other being the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011).[2] The battle to contain the contamination and avert a greater catastrophe ultimately involved over 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles (18 billion $USD) .[3][4] During the accident itself 31 people died, and long-term effects such as cancers and deformities are still being accounted for.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernobyl_disaster

"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #68 on: September 24, 2014, 01:42:54 »
Death from above.... wayyyyyyyyyy above:


Nicaragua meteorite strike raises concerns over undetected space objects

A meteorite believed to have originated from the "Pitbull" asteroid just misses landing on Managua airport

A meteorite that landed "like a bomb", narrowly missing Nicaragua's main airport, has raised concerns over scientists' ability to track space objects on potential collision courses with Earth.

Officials said they "thanked God" there were no injuries as the rock landed in Managua, a sprawling city of 1.2 million people, where it left a crater 40ft wide and 16ft deep.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/centralamericaandthecaribbean/nicaragua/11082751/Nicaragua-meteorite-strike-raises-concerns-over-undetected-space-objects.html
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #69 on: September 29, 2014, 18:14:31 »
Cancer victim 'came back to life' in her grave

Visitors to a cemetery in Greece claim they heard a woman shouting from inside her coffin and dug her up, only for her to die for a second time

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/greece/11124954/Cancer-victim-came-back-to-life-in-her-grave.html
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #70 on: October 02, 2014, 17:32:39 »
Meanwhile, in Australia... :o
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline PMedMoe

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #71 on: October 02, 2014, 18:14:59 »
Meanwhile, in Australia... :o

Yep, drove over one there (not sure if it was already dead beforehand) that went from one side of the road to the other.....  :o
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #72 on: October 02, 2014, 22:55:40 »
Yep, drove over one there (not sure if it was already dead beforehand) that went from one side of the road to the other.....  :o

What... is.... it?
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Loachman

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #73 on: October 03, 2014, 06:01:07 »
What... is.... it?

A road? It's a long, flat, grey thing that cars drive on.

Offline cupper

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Re: Your daily 'thing to be afraid of'
« Reply #74 on: October 03, 2014, 22:47:18 »
A road? It's a long, flat, grey thing that cars drive on.

And ironically, the same definition can be given to the snake when it gets run over in the middle of the road. ;D
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

There is no God, and life is just a myth.

"He who drinks, sleeps. He who sleeps, does not sin. He who does not sin, is holy. Therefore he who drinks, is holy."

Let's Go CAPS!