Author Topic: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage  (Read 34568 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline E.R. Campbell

  • Retired, years ago
  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Myth
  • *
  • 456,210
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 18,074
Re: Review of Canadian History
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2013, 10:51:39 »
There were few better 20th century historians than Hugh Trevor-Roper.

Trevor-Roper wrote, in his essay The Idea of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire*, "What was the lesson which Gibbon learned from Montesquieu? Briefly, it was that human history is . . . a process, and a process governed, in its detail, not by a divine plan . . . but by a complex of social forces which a 'philosophic historian,' that is, a historian who looked behind mere events for fundamental ideas, causes and connexions . . . could isolate and describe."

So, history is, as Margaret MacMillan said, about "facts and order" and it is also, as Hugh Trevor-Roper suggests, about isolating and describing the "complex of social forces" that act on people in any given time and space. How we interpret the facts, in their proper order, and how we interpret the many social forces that impacted them, is how we write, rewrite and continuously revise history. Facts can be unpleasant, especially when they interfere with our beliefs, and revisionist historians are always valuable because they make us reevaluate the "facts and order" and the "social forces" and allow us to draw new conclusions in light of all the available evidence. And history is, like the "hard" sciences, an "evidence based" field, you cannot make up history just because you believe something should be true, or not.

_____
* Which is found in the posthumous collection of his essays entitled "History and the Enlightenment", which is one of my favourites from Trevor-Roper for both its erudition and the elegance of its prose.
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
----------
Like what you see/read here on Army.ca?  Subscribe, and help keep it "on the air!"

Offline pbi

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 32,680
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,641
Re: Review of Canadian History
« Reply #26 on: August 28, 2013, 13:07:30 »
If only schools would bring in guest speakers.

Eg Someone who served in a "peacekeeping" role in say bosnia. Come to the school and give a personal account. I'm sure there's plenty of current ex or serving members who are intelligent enough to talk to a highschool class. History/social studies would be more entertaining and personal. Though somehow the program would have to keep the journalists out.

Then again schools don't like teaching the truth. I think my teachers enjoyed indoctrinating students to advance their own agendas.

This was never my experience when I was in uniform (up until 2012), no matter where I served in Canada. I found  that schools (at all grade levels and including post-secondary)were constantly looking for military speakers. The demand was higher around Remembrance Day, but it existed all year long. I always tried to take advantage of as many of these opportunities as I could, and encouraged the folks who worked for me to do the same.
When I did speak, I almost always found the students to be attentive and genuinely interested in Canadian military history. Neither they nor their teachers were very well informed, but at least we can give them credit for trying.

IMHO, the CF  (particularly at the senior levels) over the decades must share a large chunk of the historical blame for this misunderstanding. We have, at times, been only far too happy to cultivate our image as peacekeepers when it suited us to do so. When you tell people you are something that you aren't,  don't be surprised at what happens when you reveal who you really are.
The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools. ...

The true measure of a man is what he would do if he knew he never would be found out...

Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 188,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,432
Re: Review of Canadian History
« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2013, 12:04:11 »
Seems Quebec is getting in on the same act.
Quote
PQ wants to improve teaching of “national history”
Monique Muise
The Ottawa Citizen
03 September 2013


The provincial government has announced it is taking steps to improve the teaching of “national history” in elementary schools, high schools and CEGEPs in Quebec.

A “reinforcement of identity” and a more thorough grounding in history in schools is something that Quebecers have been calling for, said Parti Québécois Higher Education minister Pierre Duchesne in a release issued Monday.

“It is time to discuss what defines us,” said Duchesne. “This will help produce open-minded students, action-oriented citizens and Quebecers with more self-confidence.”

Two people have been tasked with studying where changes can be made in the primary and secondary school curricula. Jacques Beauchemin, the interim director general of l’Office québécois de la langue française, and Université du Québec à Montréal history professor Nadia Fahmy-Eid will consult with teachers and historians, the release said, and then prepare a report to be submitted by the end of this year. Pilot projects in various schools are expected to be launched in September 2014.

The government’s release does not specify if the teaching of “national history” at these levels refers to the whole of Canada or just to Quebec. Calls to the government on Monday to request clarification were not immediately returned, but the appointment of Beauchemin to spearhead the efforts is telling. He is considered an expert on Quebec society and culture.

At the CEGEP level, the PQ government was more clear: it is aiming to introduce a new, mandatory course in “Quebec’s national history” within the next 12 months. An existing committee of CEGEP teachers and administrators will be asked to determine how best to structure and integrate the new course, Duchesne said. Like the changes to the primary and secondary curricula, it is expected to be rolled out in September 2014.

The Mouvement national des Québécoises et des Québécois — an umbrella group of organizations which aims to “defend and promote Québécois identity and make Quebec a French and democratic country” — reacted swiftly to Monday’s announcement, saying it is very happy with the government’s plans.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/wants+improve+teaching+national+history/8860329/story.html


Offline pbi

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 32,680
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,641
Re: Review of Canadian History
« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2013, 10:40:57 »
Quote
“This will help produce open-minded students, action-oriented citizens and Quebecers with more self-confidence.”

Whatever might be the outcome of any effort by the Marois government, "open-mindedness" is not likely to be a result. So far they seem to be demonstrating a narrow, ethnically-based version of nationalism that is designed to appeal to a rather ugly strand in Quebec sociey: xenophobia fuelled by ignorance. It's quite telling that the City of Montreal (by far the most diverse city in Quebec) recently passed a resolution countering the thrust of the "Charte".

Quote
The government’s release does not specify if the teaching of “national history” at these levels refers to the whole of Canada or just to Quebec.

Really? Want to hazard a wild-assed guess what it's about?

Quote
“defend and promote Québécois identity and make Quebec a French and democratic country”

I have to wonder if the Marois' government's worldview doesn't risk making these two things incompatible with each other..

I'm not any fan of the hard Right, but this is the Left at its worst, drifting into "correct thinking".

The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools. ...

The true measure of a man is what he would do if he knew he never would be found out...

Offline Thucydides

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 182,525
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 13,206
  • Freespeecher
Re: Review of Canadian History
« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2013, 21:57:09 »
I'm not any fan of the hard Right, but this is the Left at its worst, drifting into "correct thinking".

Yes, doctrinaire Libertarians (with a big "L") can be annoying at social events.  ;)

The correct political form for the PQ at this time is "National Socialism", where correct thinking gate the backing of State power, and the State distributes the spoils of taxpayer money according to their own narrow ethnic definitions.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline pbi

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 32,680
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,641
Re: Review of Canadian History
« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2013, 07:36:27 »
Yes, doctrinaire Libertarians (with a big "L") can be annoying at social events.  ;)

The correct political form for the PQ at this time is "National Socialism", where correct thinking gate the backing of State power, and the State distributes the spoils of taxpayer money according to their own narrow ethnic definitions.


Hmmmm...yesss..."National Socialism"....ethnic purity....state power-why do these phrases seem to ring a bell?
?
The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools. ...

The true measure of a man is what he would do if he knew he never would be found out...

Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 188,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,432
Remembering Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #31 on: October 17, 2013, 00:43:36 »
Not sure what is involved in a "rededication."  I wonder if this will see "Afghanistan" added to the list of wars carved into the monument.
Quote
Veterans groups dismiss war memorial rededication as ‘fluff’
Robert Sibley
OTTAWA CITIZEN
16 October 2013


“Fluff.” That, in a word, pretty much sums up the response of veterans’ groups to the Conservatives’ throne speech announcement that the government intends to rededicate the National War Memorial to honour those who’ve fallen in the service of the country.

“It’s important that veterans be recognized, yes, but the Conservatives are just wrapping themselves in the flag,” said Michael Blais, president of Canadian Veterans Advocacy. “It’s headlines without substance, to make themselves look good.”

On Wednesday, toward the end of his hour-long throne speech, Gov. Gen. David Johnston announced that as part of events next year commemorating the centennial of the First World War and the 75th anniversary of the Second World War, the government was “rededicating the National War Memorial to the memory of all men and women who fought for our country.”

The government also intends to mark the end of Canada’s decade-long mission in Afghanistan by honouring those in uniform who “made the ultimate sacrifice combating the spread of terrorism,” as well as promote “the proud history of our Canadian Armed Forces by restoring military traditions.”

Gordon Jenkins, president of the NATO Veterans Organization of Canada, said it’s fine to honour the dead of past wars, but it’s the still-living veterans who need the government’s attention. “What are they doing for the living? We’re not getting anything for veterans (in the throne speech) except lip service.”

He and Blais observed that the government boasts of its dedication to Canadian military history and its willingness to spend hundreds of thousands to mark the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812. But, they said, such actions haven’t translated into serving veterans well.

“They’re going to spend millions on remembering (the First World War),” said Jenkins. “These are the dead, and let’s give them respect, but is this what Veterans Affairs is now? The war memorial doesn’t need rededicating. We need something substantive.”

Such criticism echoes a recent report from Veterans Ombudsman Guy Parent, who chastised the Tory government for shortfalls in the level of financial support given to veterans, particularly those severely wounded or disabled. “It is simply not acceptable to let veterans who have sacrificed the most for their country ... live their lives with unmet financial needs,” the ombudsman said in a study that compared the old system of compensating veterans under the Pension Act with the inadequacies of the new Veterans Charter, legislation backed by the Conservative government when enacted in 2006.

A spokesman for Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino defended the department’s record.   “Our Government has made enormous and substantial investments to support Canada’s Veterans, including nearly five billion in additional funds towards assistance and services for Veterans and their families,” said Joshua Zanin in an email. “As committed in the Speech From the Throne, we will continue to act further to support vulnerable and homeless Veterans and to ensure the successful transition of Veterans into civilian life after their service in uniform.”

Veterans were upset earlier this summer after federal lawyers urged a B.C. judge to dismiss a class-action lawsuit filed by injured Afghan veterans, claiming the government has no extraordinary social obligation toward veterans, and owes them nothing more than what they received under the Veterans Charter.

Add this attitude to defence funding issues — including, for example, delays in a $10-million program to replace the aging Lee Enfield rifles used by the Arctic Rangers — and critics like Jenkins and Blais say it’s hard to take seriously the government’s claim of commitment to the military and its veterans.

“Commemoration is fine,” said Blais. “We have an obligation to the fallen. But we also have an obligation to those who are suffering today.

“We’ve got a government that likes to fly the flag, but look what they are actually doing. It’s all fluff. It’s not in response to the real needs of veterans.”
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/ottawa/Veterans+groups+dismiss+memorial+rededication+fluff/9045278/story.html

Offline pbi

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 32,680
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,641
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2013, 14:06:59 »
Quote
“We’ve got a government that likes to fly the flag, but look what they are actually doing. It’s all fluff. It’s not in response to the real needs of veterans.”

Patriotism: the last refuge of the scoundrel. And of the politician. People may have faulted Pat Stogran's aggressiveness when he was Ombudsman, but it's interesting to note that his successor is identifying very similar things.
The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools. ...

The true measure of a man is what he would do if he knew he never would be found out...

Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 188,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,432
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #33 on: January 14, 2015, 01:22:55 »
Proof that you can't ever please everybody - as the government continues to receive criticism for excesses spent on 1812, WWI, WWII, and Confederation anniversaries, they are simultaneously receiving the opposite criticism of not spending enough for the Canadian flag anniversary.
Quote
As Maple Leaf approaches 50, some in Canada wonder: Where's the party?
CTV News
13 Jan 2015

OTTAWA -- With the 50th birthday of Canada's beloved Maple Leaf flag just a month away, some are wondering why there there's been so little fanfare from the federal government.

Canadian Heritage says National Flag of Canada Day will be marked by educational activities and special events, including at the annual Winterlude festivities in Ottawa in the weeks to come.

The department also says community groups and schools are being encouraged to mark the anniversary throughout the year.

That pales in comparison to a multimillion-dollar effort to mark Canada's 150th birthday in 2017, and $5.2 million that was spent to mark the bicentennial of the War of 1812.

Roy Mayer, the founder of the Canada Flag Holiday Campaign, has written to Prime Minister Stephen Harper to express his disappointment, saying the Canadian icon deserves a major celebration.

Bob Harper, the founder of the 50 Years of Our Flag Committee, based in Brockville, Ont., also calls Ottawa's party-planning disappointing.

Heritage Minister Shelly Glover's office did not immediately reply to a request for a comment.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/as-maple-leaf-approaches-50-some-in-canada-wonder-where-s-the-party-1.2186902

Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 188,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,432
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #34 on: February 02, 2015, 01:14:37 »
The dirth of attention on the flag anniversary is still gathering comment.  I like the idea of investing more in peacekeeping histories; that could be a conduit toward relieving so many Canadians of their misconceptions about the altruistism, means and effectiveness of such missions.

Quote
Will Harper mark the Maple Leaf flag’s 50th anniversary?
Andrew Cohen
Times Colonist
29 January 2015

On Feb. 15, 1965, about 10,000 people gathered on Parliament Hill to watch the raising of Canada’s new flag.

At noon, amid a muffled 21-gun salute, a gust of wind gave the flag “the first flutter of life,” Peter C. Newman observed.

“If our nation by God’s grace endures a thousand years, this day will always be remembered as a milestone in Canada’s national progress,” said prime minister Lester Pearson.

Pearson managed a smile from his flu-ridden body before returning to bed. John Diefenbaker, who had fought the flag as opposition leader, wiped away tears.

Fifty years on, the flag is an imperishable symbol of national sovereignty. More than ever, we are a nation of flag-wavers. But its birth is less than “a milestone.” Indeed, the Conservatives are happy to ignore the flag.

For a government that has made history its mantra, we would expect this anniversary to be a big deal. It’s not.

On Jan. 11, Stephen Harper was in Kingston, Ont., to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Sir John A. Macdonald. A coin was struck and a stamp issued; the government spent $4 million.

Celebrating the past is the responsibility of a self-aware people and its leaders. The problem is that as much as this government likes to remember, it does so selectively.

The Conservatives spent millions commemorating the War of 1812 (though not the 200 years of peace between Canada and the United States that followed). They lavish money on projects recalling Canada’s role in the world wars and the Korean War.

From Historica Canada, the federal government commissions excellent oral histories from veterans. In our role in international peacekeeping, it is uninterested.

Of other anniversaries — such as the patriation of the British North America Act and the establishment of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982 — it does little.

See the pattern here? To the Conservatives, peacekeeping, the Charter — even the founding of NATO in 1949 — are achievements of Liberal governments. Why celebrate them?

The Conservatives opposed the flag ferociously in 1964. A bloviating Diefenbaker misplayed it from the beginning, when he proposed a divisive national plebiscite to decide the issue.

As Parliament debated a new flag over 37 days in the autumn of 1964, Diefenbaker mourned the loss of “the Christian crosses, the spiritual elements” from the old flag. An Edwardian in the Jet Age and an unreconstructed anglophile, he could not understand the changing Canada.

True, French Canada was not demanding a new flag (“Quebec doesn’t give a tinker’s dam about a new flag,” sniffed an unelected Pierre Elliott Trudeau in June 1964), but a visionary Pearson saw its importance as a unifying national symbol.

Courageously, he announced his commitment to a new flag before the Canadian Legion in Winnipeg. Amid a chorus of boos from angry veterans, he kept talking.

After 308 speeches and acrimonious debate, the flag was approved on Dec. 15, 1964. The vote was 163 to 78. Almost all the opposition came from Conservatives — though francophone Tories voted with the majority — who immediately found themselves on the wrong side of history.

So it’s unsurprising to learn that a Conservative government — which is building a (misplaced) Memorial to the Victims of Communism in Ottawa and finds $1.5 million to raise awareness of the Holodomor, the state-sponsored Ukrainian famine in the 1930s — is spending all of $50,000 to commemorate the Maple Leaf.

It is left to patriots like Mauril Bélanger, the MP from Ottawa-Vanier, to wave the flag on its golden anniversary. He has designed an attractive poster tracing the flag’s history, which he is distributing to 14,000 students.

Belanger, bless him, is doing what the government should be doing.

Today, in the relentless politicization of our culture, we have Conservative history and Liberal history.

It raises the question: At noon on Feb. 15, will Stephen Harper and his ministers stand with Liberals and New Democrats under the Peace Tower and honour the Maple Leaf?
http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/columnists/andrew-cohen-will-harper-mark-the-maple-leaf-flag-s-50th-anniversary-1.1745570

Offline Colin P

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 101,150
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,820
  • Civilian
    • http://www.pacific.ccg-gcc.gc.ca
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #35 on: February 02, 2015, 10:44:15 »
My French-Canadian girlfriend got mad at me for talking about Napoleon, she said "I don't care about that English history"  ::)

I found French-Canadians were either very very interested in the world around them or very very insular, not a lot inbetween. 

Offline krimynal

    Totally Lost.

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 17,275
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 726
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #36 on: February 02, 2015, 11:05:12 »
sadly us french Canadian , have little to no knowledge of history , wether it's because of school system or whatever ....

I remember back in high school were the only history class we had was about Quebec , How it was discovered , How it was built , etc.

It's sad that we are very closed minded , and that our school system is actually happy about having the students completely shadowed to what is going on outside of Quebec .... If you had decent teachers , they would go out of the "norm" to give you info on World History / World Geography ... but sadly a lot of teachers were simply giving us lessons on what was in the book ....
"Do not pray for an easy life , pray for the strengh to endure a difficult one"   Bruce Lee

Offline George Wallace

  • Army.ca Fossil
  • *****
  • 427,795
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 31,390
  • Crewman
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #37 on: February 02, 2015, 11:14:04 »
sadly us french Canadian , have little to no knowledge of history , wether it's because of school system or whatever ....

I remember back in high school were the only history class we had was about Quebec , How it was discovered , How it was built , etc.

It's sad that we are very closed minded , and that our school system is actually happy about having the students completely shadowed to what is going on outside of Quebec .... If you had decent teachers , they would go out of the "norm" to give you info on World History / World Geography ... but sadly a lot of teachers were simply giving us lessons on what was in the book ....

Sadly, I remember a CBC documentary that showed that even the teaching of Quebec history was contrary to what other provinces were teaching.  The documentary showed a Quebec teacher actually teaching that the English conquest took away the Rights of the French to their French language, the Catholic Church, the Seigneurial System, and Civil Law.  All false.  Quebecers still have the right to speak French, attend the church of their choice, and they are the only province to use Civil Law.  The Seigneurial System is probably the only thing that has changed, more due to the passage of time than English conquest.
DISCLAIMER: The opinions and arguments of George Wallace posted on this Site are solely those of George Wallace and not the opinion of Army.ca and are posted for information purposes only.
Unless so stated, they are reflective of my opinion -- and my opinion only, a right that I enjoy along with every other Canadian citizen.

Offline krimynal

    Totally Lost.

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 17,275
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 726
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #38 on: February 02, 2015, 11:18:34 »
Yeah I remember being told the same in my history class back in high school !  But yeah good thing that a year later I had the chance to get a "out-of-the-box-thinker" teacher that basically told us , that we had been brain raped last year , and here are the real facts , and by the way , here is some part of history that you guys never heard before !

that teacher was awesome sadly , he was in a "one-of-a-kind" group , you can count those type of teacher on your finger !
"Do not pray for an easy life , pray for the strengh to endure a difficult one"   Bruce Lee

Offline Cloud Cover

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 13,230
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,204
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #39 on: February 03, 2015, 21:51:53 »
George: The Royal Proclamation of 1763 did in fact extinguish many of those rights in the newly acquired territories after the French defeats in the 7 years war. The same rights were subsequently and in the main re-established in the Constitution Act 1791, including the Seigneurial system and Civil Code and in fact this was an ongoing restoration process right up until the Constitution Act 1982.

The same Royal Proclamation is also the legal basis on which many present day Indian land claims and other perceived injustices to first nations are founded. If anybody was screwed by the British, it was the Canadians as we have come to know ourselves today. At least the Brits got it right when they left India, not that they had any real choice in that case anyway.     
You're right. I Never  Met A Motherfucker Quite Like You, or someone as smart as you.  Never ever will, either.

Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 188,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,432
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #40 on: February 05, 2015, 09:32:44 »
I guess universities are joining museums in the group of oppressed historians.
Quote
Harper changing Gregg centre's purpose
Re: Military history

The Daily Gleaner
30 Jan 2014

It will surprise nobody to be reminded that the Stephen Harper government does not encourage informed discussion of national policies.
 
It is, however, disappointing that UNB's Gregg Centre for the Study of War and Society, intended "for the study of war and society" should be starved of funds for its intended purpose, but funded to divert its energies into the new rhetoric of military heroism - preparing hagiographies of Victoria Cross soldiers.
 
For decades the Department of National Defense provided modest funding to universities with scholars using the discipline of historical analysis to discover, record, and evaluate the significance of Canada's military forces as part of the Canadian place in international relations. UNB interpreted its remit as extending from interpretative military history, to the study of terrorism, the laws of military action, and family violence in the military. An annual forum in Ottawa made sure that such findings were known where they could be applied.
 
All that is swept away now, and the historians are put to work polishing up the military image which Harper finds politically useful.
 
Nicholas Tracy
Associate, Gregg Centre for the Study of War and Society

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 91,905
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,785
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #41 on: February 05, 2015, 09:52:30 »
George: The Royal Proclamation of 1763 did in fact extinguish many of those rights in the newly acquired territories after the French defeats in the 7 years war. The same rights were subsequently and in the main re-established in the Constitution Act 1791, including the Seigneurial system and Civil Code and in fact this was an ongoing restoration process right up until the Constitution Act 1982.

Not only is Whiskey601 almost correct (I think he refers to the Quebec Act of 1774, as it is the one that recognized these rights anew for the first time), but in an interesting flip side of the said Quebec Act of 1774 that just shows how everything is connected, the said Quebec Act is one of the unacceptable actions of the English King directly mentioned in the American Declaration of Independence. The Act whereby the King unilaterally "deprived" a "neighbouring British Colony" of the "benefits of English Common Law" is Canada, and the deprivation came from the re-institution of the Customs of Paris civil law (no Napoleonic code in existence yet, Napoleon was 5 years old at the time.)

Offline Thucydides

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 182,525
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 13,206
  • Freespeecher
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #42 on: February 07, 2015, 17:11:07 »
The dirth of attention on the flag anniversary is still gathering comment.  I like the idea of investing more in peacekeeping histories; that could be a conduit toward relieving so many Canadians of their misconceptions about the altruistism, means and effectiveness of such missions.
http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/columnists/andrew-cohen-will-harper-mark-the-maple-leaf-flag-s-50th-anniversary-1.1745570

Sadly, I rather doubt that the bulk of "peacekeeping" historians will focus on the use of peacekeeping missions as economy of force measures to maintain the bulk of our military capability in Germany and to a lesser extent Norway...
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Online Old Sweat

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 200,380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,355
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #43 on: February 07, 2015, 17:17:20 »
As I recall, during the sixties, seventies and eighties, other than for Cyprus there was very little combat arms involvement in peacekeeping. There were a few observer missions that drew officers from across the army and later the forces, but most of the peacekeeping forces we provided had logistics and communications roles. The rationale was that we had sophisticated capabilities in those fields, really that was the explanation, that most armies did not.

Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 188,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,432
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #44 on: February 12, 2015, 02:35:06 »
The flag flap continues over which elements of Canadian heritage receive or do not receive attention from Conservative promotions.  The upside of the Conservatives not going full-retard on the flag's 50th (aside from saving money) is that we did not have another special, tacky anniversary pin throw onto our service dress uniforms.

This article covers the same ground as previous, but has several embedded videos to entertain (maybe):
Quote
Canada flag's 50th anniversary a low-key affair
Government's plans to fete the flag are minimal

By Bruce Chambers, for CBC News
11 Feb 2015

It's the 50th anniversary of the Canadian flag on Feb. 15, but the marketing of this celebration is somewhat muted compared to other recent anniversaries.​

In a 1971 television ad, a group of schoolchildren in red ponchos is singing in sub-zero temperatures. As the camera slowly pulls back, we see that the children form the Canadian flag against the white of a snow-covered field. This commercial was created by a group of Canadian ad agencies to promote national unity in the aftermath of the FLQ crisis.

Fourteen years later, crown corporation Petro-Canada also celebrated the flag, with hundreds of people holding up red and white cards to create the familiar maple leaf.

Even private corporations have, on occasion, enjoyed wrapping themselves in the flag. In 2000 — when Molson was still Canadian — CBC Radio's As It Happens’ host Jeff Douglas delivered the beer company’s famous “I Am Canadian” rant before a huge Canadian flag.

But here on the eve of our flag’s 50th birthday, the celebrations have gone almost silent.

The government has allotted $50,000 for the anniversary, along with another $200,000 to fund celebrations by provincial lieutenant-governors and other organizations.

This is in stark contrast to the splashy commercials and $5.2 million spent commemorating the bicentennial of the War of 1812.

And this year, the government is spending $4 million to mark Sir John A. Macdonald’s 200th birthday.

In addition to several historic moments funded at least in part by the government, there are major birthday events, and Sir John A. is featured on the new Toonie, special gold and silver coins, and a new stamp.

Sure, one previously-produced historic moment is available about the development of the flag, but it doesn’t mention the 50th anniversary.

With so little marketing allocated to our national emblem's 50th anniversary, if we want to see a truly stirring celebration of Canada’s flag we’re going to have to look back at old beer and gasoline commercials.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/canada-flag-s-50th-anniversary-a-low-key-affair-1.2950315

Meanwhile, globe news looks a little deeper at the same:
Quote
Are the Conservatives playing politics with the Canadian flag?
By Amy Minsky, for Global News   
11 Feb 2015

OTTAWA — The Harper government may not be completely ignoring the 50th anniversary of the Canadian flag, but the relatively modest plans to mark the day have some claiming the flag is getting the shaft.

Technically, plans in the works; one page of Heritage Canada’s website invites citizens to celebrate the flag … by doing their own thing.

“Canadians are invited to join together and celebrate our flag by organizing their own public events or by showing their pride on social media,” Heritage Canada’s website suggests.

Another page on the site offers activity ideas for the proactive patriots among us. Suggestions include: drawing a mural at school, organizing and inviting a veteran to a singing of the national anthem or flag raising ceremony, and hosting a bake sale with a National Flag of Canada theme. 

Is the beaming red and white flag — the one Canadians wave proudly when the country’s athletes win gold, sew to backpacks when touring foreign countries and draw on their cheeks every July 1 — being brushed off?

The Liberals think so.

“It’s unfortunate because Canadians are proud of their flag,” Liberal heritage critic Stephane Dion said in an interview.

It was Feb. 15, 1965 when the maple leaf flag was raised for the first time on Parliament Hill, the successful end to a project Liberal prime minister Lester Pearson spearheaded. Today, the same familiar design tops each of the three main buildings on the Hill. It hangs from buildings and balconies each Canada Day and is lowered to half-mast when the nation mourns the deaths of those who helped shape the country.

As of Feb. 11, the calendar of events on Heritage Canada’s main page listed Sir John A. Macdonald Day (celebrated every Jan. 11) and Winterlude (an annual Ottawa-area winter celebration running Jan. 30 to Feb 16).

The flag’s anniversary does receive billing elsewhere on the site, but clicking a 50th anniversary link only gets a visitor to a page inviting them to do their own thing or to share a photo of the flag on social media.

A spokeswoman for Heritage Minister Shelly Glover wrote that government representatives would attend some events suggested online (flag-raising ceremonies in communities), are “partnering” with organizations like Royal Canadian Legions to promote the anniversary and that there will be a flag-raising and some birthday cake at Winterlude on Sunday.

Additionally, the Museum of History will have an exhibit on the creation of the flag, and the Canadian Mint and Canada Post are introducing commemorative coins and stamps, the spokeswoman wrote.

Though she offered these events, the spokeswoman didn’t comment directly on the comparatively small scope of the celebrations.

“It’s the bare minimum,” Dion said of the Conservatives’ plans for the anniversary. “Why not a national celebration on the Hill? It’s very strange the government is not doing that.”

By contrast, the day last month when Canada’s first prime minister, Conservative John A. MacDonald, would have turned 200 years old attracted the prime minister to Kingston, Ont., as well as former prime ministers Kim Campbell and John Turner, government House leader Peter Van Loan and Transport Minister Lisa Raitt, among other distinguished guests.

A celebration for the War of 1812, meanwhile, warranted its own government website, 1812.gc.ca, and five years’ worth of news releases.

“The Liberals think the flag should have been celebrated at least as much as the War of 1812,” Dion said. “We are very proud of what Sir John A. did for the country. To celebrate him is very important. But it’s also important to celebrate the flag.”

The price tags for the celebrations are also revealing; Ottawa earmarked $50,000 for celebrations for the flag’s birthday, compared to almost $4 million for the celebration of Sir John A.’s birth, and $5.2 million for the bicentennial of the War of 1812.

Asked why he believes the Conservatives are doing only the “bare minimum,” Dion said he didn’t want to “speculate about something that should be so far above partisanship.”

Although a Liberal prime minister was in power when the national flag was born, the flag has come to symbolize the country — not a party or dogma or class of people, Dion said.

“It’s clearly Canadian. It’s beautiful, it’s a celebration of our immense nature,” he said.

By the time Pearson even launched his hunt for a flag, Parliament had been bouncing the idea around for a half century.

It began with a committee struck in 1925 that never finished its job.

Twenty years later, another committee was tasked with researching potential Canadian flags and received upwards of 2,500 submissions. Again, this committee never settled on anything, and Parliament was never called to vote on a favoured design.

Finally, in 1964, Pearson set a goal to adopt a Canadian flag ahead of the centennial Confederation celebrations three years down the road. An all-party committee soon short-listed three designs.

Settling on one of the three wasn’t easy — different influencers preferred different designs. Pearson preferred the blue flag with three red maple leafs on a white square in the middle; others preferred the design similar to the winner, but adorned with a Union Jack and three fleurs-de-lys.

Those embellishments — the triple maple leaf, Union Jack and fleurs-de-lys — were all throwbacks to the Red Ensign, the flag that had long represented Canada though never officially adopted.

Eventually, the committee chose the now familiar flag bearing a red maple leaf on a white square between two vertical red bands. The design was brought to Parliament for a vote, which it passed, 163 to 78.

Liberal stalwart Jean Chretien and party leader Justin Trudeau will host a public event on Sunday afternoon at the University of Toronto Mississauga athletic centre.
http://globalnews.ca/news/1824425/are-the-conservatives-playing-politics-with-the-canadian-flag/

And there are plenty of online comments and letters to editors on the topic.  Some are fairly tame:
Quote
CELEBRATING OUR FLAG
Liz Seger, Port Colborne
St Catharines Standard
11 Feb 2015

Feb. 15 marks the 50th anniversary of the adoption of our distinctive red maple leaf flag by the Liberal government of Lester Pearson.

Other countries celebrate their flag with a special day. The government of Canada should have done so as well, especially this year. There may not have been any military battles over our maple leaf flag, but there certainly were personal ones.

I’m proud to have been able to travel throughout the world and that my maple leaf flag, whether on my back pack, my luggage or as a pin on my shirt tab or blazer lapel. Happy 50th birthday to our flag,
http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/2015/02/11/letters-to-the-editor-for-february-12

but there is a lot more ludicrous (including accusations that the Conservatives want to bring back the Red Ensign). 

Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 188,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,432
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #45 on: February 12, 2015, 02:37:51 »
Here is one of the more extreme takes on the lack of attention being given to the Canadian Flag's 50th anniversary and with a CAF connection.  I appreciate this guy's position on cosmetic changes that we are going through, but his arguments suffer from some errors of fact (while the Order of the Bath is an order of knights, the name used below is just wrong) and I think it is a little over the top to suggest that the three maple leaf insignia is less Canadian than the single maple leaf Army insignia (though, I do prefer the look of the single leaf).

Quote
Harper purposely aiming for Canadians to ignore flag’s anniversary
John Raulston,  Colwood, BC
The Gateway
04 Feb 2015

If one could almost miss the 50th anniversary of Canada’s distinct Maple Leaf, it is because that is exactly as PM Harper wants it. Unveiled under a Liberal PM, Harper would rather minimize, ignore, belittle or dismiss this national icon from our Canadian history. In fact, he has removed this distinct emblem of national identity from some places already.

After serving for years as the shoulder “pip” in Canadian Army general ranks, PM Harper has stripped the Canadian Maple Leaf from the shoulder of Army uniforms to replace it with the British Star of the Knightly Order. It does not matter that the star represents a class system inconsistent with Canadian values and a British social rank that Canadians are barred from holding. Harper would rather see Canadian officers wearing a British Star before a “Liberal Leaf”.

He has found other places to rub-out that big, solitary Maple Leaf that Canadians have come to so strongly identify with. In the mid to late ‘90s, a revived Canadian Army badge was created. It brought together the historical, heritage badge with the modern single Canadian Maple Leaf. It was the perfect balance of modern and historical identity. But this Army badge, like the strong unitary leaf upon it, was too Liberal for PM Harper. It has been scrapped along with the Maple Leaf rank as some unknown cost to tax payers. The Army is returning the 1950’s badge with three small connected Maple Leafs. Back in the 50’s, those three connected leafs were the only distinctly Canadian thing barely visible at the bottom of the shield in our Red Ensign flag. Today it is the unitary leaf that Canadians define their identity and that is the one that should be in our national symbols.

But maybe that is where PM Harper wants to go anyway. He hopes we all might not notice as the 50th anniversary of our flag passes by because he would rather celebrate the old Red Ensign and Union Jack over any Liberal invention.

http://thegatewayonline.ca/2015/02/print-issue-february-4-2015/

Offline Colin P

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 101,150
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,820
  • Civilian
    • http://www.pacific.ccg-gcc.gc.ca
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #46 on: February 13, 2015, 10:31:58 »
wasn't there a insignia with 3 branches and maple Leaf on each end?

Offline daftandbarmy

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 172,490
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 10,645
  • The Older I Get, The Better I Was
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #47 on: February 13, 2015, 14:04:55 »
Here is one of the more extreme takes on the lack of attention being given to the Canadian Flag's 50th anniversary and with a CAF connection.  I appreciate this guy's position on cosmetic changes that we are going through, but his arguments suffer from some errors of fact (while the Order of the Bath is an order of knights, the name used below is just wrong) and I think it is a little over the top to suggest that the three maple leaf insignia is less Canadian than the single maple leaf Army insignia (though, I do prefer the look of the single leaf).
http://thegatewayonline.ca/2015/02/print-issue-february-4-2015/

He's from Colwood.

I can see Colwood right now from where I'm sitting in downtown Victoria.

It's a bit distant, and foggy.

That is all  ;D
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Colin P

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 101,150
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,820
  • Civilian
    • http://www.pacific.ccg-gcc.gc.ca
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #48 on: February 13, 2015, 16:58:37 »
ah this was what I was thinking of


Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 188,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,432
Re: Review of Canadian History & Emphasis of Canadian Military Heritage
« Reply #49 on: February 13, 2015, 17:06:43 »
wasn't there a insignia with 3 branches and maple Leaf on each end?
ah this was what I was thinking of

You might also have been thinking of the "Pearson Pennant."