Author Topic: Nasa: Voyager 1 & 2  (Read 1618 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline GAP

  • Semper Fi
  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 215,875
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 12,961
Nasa: Voyager 1 & 2
« on: December 14, 2010, 07:41:33 »
Voyager near Solar System's edge
By Jonathan Amos Science correspondent, BBC News, San Francisco 13 December 2010 Last updated at 23:43 ET
Article Link
 
Voyager 1, the most distant spacecraft from Earth, has reached a new milestone in its quest to leave the Solar System.

Now 17.4bn km (10.8bn miles) from home, the veteran probe has detected a distinct change in the flow of particles that surround it.

These particles, which emanate from the Sun, are no longer travelling outwards but are moving sideways.

It means Voyager must be very close to making the jump to interstellar space - the space between the stars.

Edward Stone, the Voyager project scientist, lauded the explorer and the fascinating science it continues to return 33 years after launch.

"When Voyager was launched, the space age itself was only 20 years old, so there was no basis to know that spacecraft could last so long," he told BBC News.

"We had no idea how far we would have to travel to get outside the Solar System. We now know that in roughly five years, we should be outside for the first time."

Dr Stone was speaking here at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting, the largest gathering of Earth scientists in the world.
Particle bubble

Voyager 1 was launched on 5 September 1977, and its sister spacecraft, Voyager 2, on 20 August 1977.

The Nasa probes' initial goal was to survey the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, a task completed in 1989.

They were then despatched towards deep space, in the general direction of the centre of our Milky Way Galaxy.

Sustained by their radioactive power packs, the probes' instruments continue to function well and return data to Earth, although the vast distance between them and Earth means a radio message now has a travel time of about 16 hours.

The newly reported observation comes from Voyager 1's Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument, which has been monitoring the velocity of the solar wind.

This stream of charged particles forms a bubble around our Solar System known as the heliosphere. The wind travels at "supersonic" speed until it crosses a shockwave called the termination shock.

At this point, the wind then slows dramatically and heats up in a region termed the heliosheath. Voyager has determined the velocity of the wind at its location has now slowed to zero.
Racing onwards

"We have gotten to the point where the wind from the Sun, which until now has always had an outward motion, is no longer moving outward; it is only moving sideways so that it can end up going down the tail of the heliosphere, which is a comet-shaped-like object," said Dr Stone, who is based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California.

This phenomenon is a consequence of the wind pushing up against the matter coming from other stars. The boundary between the two is the "official" edge of the Solar System - the heliopause. Once Voyager crosses over, it will be in interstellar space.
More on link





Staff edit: subject title to include more recent info
« Last Edit: November 21, 2019, 09:58:23 by BeyondTheNow »
Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I´m not so sure about the universe

Offline ModlrMike

    : Riding time again... woohooo!

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 219,679
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,913
    • Canadian Association of Physician Assistants
Re: Voyager near Solar System's edge
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2010, 09:53:22 »
And if it comes back in 250 years as a sentient machine intent on destroying the planet we're going to crap our pants.
WARNING: The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher,smarter, faster and better looking than most people.
Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats. (H.L. Mencken 1919)
Zero tolerance is the politics of the lazy. All it requires is that you do nothing and ban everything.

Offline Crossfire

  • Member
  • ****
  • 10,869
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 229
Re: Voyager near Solar System's edge
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2010, 10:10:35 »
And if it comes back in 250 years as a sentient machine intent on destroying the planet we're going to crap our pants.

No worries, Capt Kirk and the crew of the Enterprise will save the day!


Offline Oldgateboatdriver

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 143,555
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,718
Re: Voyager near Solar System's edge
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2010, 10:51:42 »
Farewell. And fair solar winds Voyager!

Offline Occam

    Go RRRRRRRREDBLACKS!

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 93,415
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,008
Re: Voyager near Solar System's edge
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2010, 11:03:53 »
"When Voyager was launched, the space age itself was only 20 years old, so there was no basis to know that spacecraft could last so long," he told BBC News.

And yet, we still can't build a TV set that lasts longer than 2 years without letting out the smoke...   ;D

Offline Target Up

    ........pull, patch, and score.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 229,060
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,884
  • that's how we roll in redneck land
Re: Voyager near Solar System's edge
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2010, 11:11:32 »
And if it comes back in 250 years as a sentient machine intent on destroying the planet we're going to crap our pants.

You and I will both be crapping in our pants long before V'Ger decides to come home.   :D
Apparently, a "USUAL SUSPECT"

“In peace there's nothing so becomes a man as modest stillness and humility; but when the blast of war blows in our ears, then imitate the action of the tiger; stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, disguise fair nature with hard-favor'd rage.”

 Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and start slitting throats

aesop081

  • Guest
Re: Voyager near Solar System's edge
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2010, 12:18:45 »
You and I will both be crapping in our pants long before V'Ger decides to come home.   :D

Well, at least Hollywood has already figured out what to do in that case. Still sucks for the folks on station Epsilon 9 though......

Offline BeyondTheNow

    Commencing countdown, engines on.

  • Directing Staff
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 79,325
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,311
Re: Voyager near Solar System's edge
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2019, 09:56:13 »
Being a bit of an astronomy nut, I continue to be amazed at this mission and have kept myself updated with its progression over the years. This article popped up in my Flipboard this morning. Much like many other dimensions/measurements of objects in our universe, I also can't wrap my head around the sheer distances and vastness of these satellite's travels. Mind-blowing.

Quote
NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft crossed into interstellar space last November. Now, one year later, scientists have published the first results from the data Voyager 2 gathered as it passed from the sun’s sphere of influence and into interstellar space.

In some ways, what Voyager 2 experienced was surprisingly different from what Voyager 1 found when it passed into interstellar space in 2012. These latest results also carry a number of other surprises for astronomers. The findings were published Monday in a series of five papers in Nature Astronomy...


More at link:

https://www.discovermagazine.com/the-sciences/voyager-2s-first-reports-from-interstellar-space-surprise-scientists



For those unfamiliar with the Voyager 1 & 2 mission:

Quote
A Legacy of Discovery

When NASA launched Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 in the summer of 1977, its engineers were sending the spacecraft on specific missions. Originally, the space agency tasked the Voyagers with conducting close-up studies of Jupiter and Saturn. They would compile data on magnetic fields, the Sun’s influence, Saturn’s rings, a few large moons, and send back lots of great images. To accomplish all this, engineers built into them a generous (for the 1970s) five-year lifetime...

...The grand tour of the solar system (and beyond) continues. The primary explorers are two workmanlike spacecraft that achieved the goals scientists set before them, far surpassed their planned life spans, and adapted to new expectations by evolving technologically. Indeed, more than 40 years after their launches, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 continue to go where no one has gone before.

The data collected from Voyager 1 & 2 is simply astonishing.

More at link:

https://www.discovermagazine.com/the-sciences/the-best-of-voyager-the-longest-running-space-mission-in-history
« Last Edit: November 21, 2019, 11:17:53 by BeyondTheNow »
“I’m so sick of people thinking they can just waltz into my office when I’m obviously listening to music in 4/4.”