Author Topic: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread  (Read 192211 times)

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Offline jollyjacktar

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #450 on: October 17, 2016, 10:15:24 »
If that happens the real losers will be the civilian population.
http://edition.cnn.com/2016/10/17/middleeast/mosul-isis-operation-begins-iraq/

As always, they're the poor bastards who get it in the neck.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #451 on: October 23, 2016, 09:01:18 »
This appears to be a bit of a bolt out of the blue ...
Quote
Parliament in Iraq has voted to ban the sale, import and production of alcohol, with backers of the move arguing that its availability contradicts Islam and is unconstitutional.

Opponents argue that the vote infringes constitutional guarantees of freedom of religious belief for minority groups such as Christians.

They say they will appeal against the surprise decision in the courts.

An official said that the ban was a last-minute move by conservatives.

Since the fall of Saddam Hussein, activities perceived to be contrary to the moral code of Islam have come under repeated attack, with alcohol shops targeted in Baghdad and other cities.

While alcohol is not commonly found in restaurants and hotels in Iraq, correspondents say its consumption is relatively widespread in the scores of small shops and bars in Baghdad.

Correspondents say the new law has been passed at a time when attention is focused on the battle to wrest control of Mosul from the militant group known as Islamic State ...
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Offline SeaKingTacco

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #452 on: October 23, 2016, 09:36:32 »
Well, who would have seen that coming?

Offline Dimsum

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #453 on: October 23, 2016, 12:33:36 »
Well, who would have seen that coming?

Surely not I.   ::)
Philip II of Macedon to Spartans (346 BC):  "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city."

Reply:  "If."

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #454 on: October 23, 2016, 13:22:40 »
“The risk of insult is the price of clarity.” -- Roy H. Williams

The words I share here are my own, not those of anyone else or anybody I may be affiliated with.

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #455 on: October 30, 2016, 08:54:04 »
Alcohol ban law firing alright, law - STOPS!
Quote
Iraqi President Fuad Masoum has refused to approve the law banning alcohol which has recently been passed by the parliament.

Ameer Kinani, an advisor to the Iraqi president, said in a press conference that after the bill of prohibiting alcohol was passed by the Iraqi parliament, it was sent to the Iraqi president for approval. The president, however, has refused to approve the law, he said, noting that the president is defending the rights and freedom of the Iraqi people as prescribed in the federal constitution.

The Iraqi parliament passed a law on October 22 which prohibits the import, production and sales of alcoholic beverages. The law however angered many in the country’s Christian community who rely on the business ...
“The risk of insult is the price of clarity.” -- Roy H. Williams

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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #456 on: November 03, 2016, 11:56:35 »
French Army Caesar artillery battery supporting Mosul operation as part of TF Wagram..

https://www.yahoo.com/news/south-mosul-french-guns-back-iraqi-forces-163257942.html


"We are providing permanent support to the Iraqi troops, 24 hours a day," says Captain Alexandre, whose full name is being withheld for security reasons.

The captain is in charge of five CAESAR artillery vehicles -- trucks mounted with eight-metre-long 155mm howitzers, which have been deployed previously on French military operations in Afghanistan and Mali.

The guns are each operated by five soldiers and can fire up to six times a minute.

"We have different types of munitions: explosives that can neutralise or destroy; but also that can light up the battlefield or blind with a curtain of smoke," the captain says.

About 100 French troops have been deployed since early September as part of the task force, mainly from artillery units.

Its commander, Colonel Benoit, says the name of the task force is especially appropriate.

"Wagram is a reference to the Napoleonic battle of 1809, a victory in which the use of artillery was decisive and which was won by the Grande Armee, which was also a coalition," the colonel says.

The French soldiers are based at Qayyarah, which lies about 60 kilometres (40 miles) south of Mosul and is the main staging point for the southern front.

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #457 on: November 06, 2016, 12:30:24 »
Looks like we'll have quite a while to figure this all out:


BBC: UK ambassador - Gulf crisis 'could last 10-15 years'

https://www.iiss.org/en/expert%20commentary/blogsections/2015-23ef/february-9d08/gulf-crisis-could-last-10-15-years-d803
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Offline Journeyman

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #458 on: November 06, 2016, 12:51:05 »
BBC: UK ambassador - Gulf crisis 'could last 10-15 years'
Sounds like a bit of an optimist.  ;)

Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #459 on: November 08, 2016, 02:06:31 »
Few more recent developments. 

Iraqi Shi’ite militias [PMF] say offensive toward Tal Afar started

ISIL captures Iraq town of Rutba as Mosul battle rages

Iraqi Forces Battle ISIS in Western Town, Far From Mosul

* Rutba or Ar Ruthbah is in Western Anbar, basically SW of Al Qaim in the middle of BFN.  Primarily Sunni area.
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Offline GAP

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #460 on: November 08, 2016, 09:21:26 »
Hoping to make it a diversion?
Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I´m not so sure about the universe

Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #461 on: November 08, 2016, 16:15:21 »
Ya - there, Kirkuk, a few smaller actions too...
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Offline dapaterson

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #462 on: December 27, 2016, 23:54:51 »
Interesting article in the New Yorker - apparently the Mosul dam was built on soluble rock, so there's a constant stream of concrete poured into the foundation to keep it stable.  Allegedly US diplomats reported “Mosul Dam faces a serious and unprecedented risk of catastrophic failure with little warning”.

Full article at: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/01/02/a-bigger-problem-than-isis
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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #463 on: March 05, 2017, 09:46:56 »
Let's go Canada... with at least an armoured Division +  :tank2:

Why Canada has a major role to play in rebuilding Iraq

As the fight for western Mosul continues, with thousands of troops massed on the Tigris River bank, Brig. Gen. David Anderson, the Canadian senior officer in the coalition headquarters in Baghdad tells Maclean’s, “What happens here affects the rest of the world. Iraq is the focal point of a conflict between a violent extremism and a regional approach. It’s a geopolitical game. Taking Daesh, a truly evil enemy, out is having a big impact on their ability in the rest of the world. By stopping them here, we’re stopping the ISIL-inspired attacks elsewhere.”

http://www.macleans.ca/news/world/why-canada-has-a-major-role-to-play-in-rebuilding-iraq/

"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #464 on: March 05, 2017, 11:44:51 »
Thanks for that one.
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Offline Loachman

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Re: Iraq in Crisis- Merged Superthread
« Reply #465 on: July 17, 2017, 16:31:24 »
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/449540/brave-ladys-fight-against-isis-vian-dakhil-yazidi-parliamentarian?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=170717_Jolt&utm_term=Jolt

A Brave Lady’s Fight Against ISIS

by Jay Nordlinger July 17, 2017 12:00 AM

Vian Dakhil, Yazidi parliamentarian

There are millions of videos floating around the Internet, of various kinds. Like you, I have seen many of these videos. And I suppose the most moving one I have ever seen is of Vian Dakhil, a Yazidi member of the Iraqi parliament. In August 2014, she pleaded for help against ISIS, who were raping and destroying her people. She explained this. Then she said, “Save us, save us,” until she collapsed.

Dakhil was a guest at the Oslo Freedom Forum earlier this year. She gave a presentation, which began with the showing of that video. To see the presentation - and, of course, the video that leads it - go here.

I spoke to her a day or two before her presentation. There are about 1.2 million Yazidis in the world, she said. They are spread between several countries, or regions: Iraq, Syria, Kurdistan, the former USSR . . . There is also a substantial immigrant community in Germany now.

They are an ancient people, the Yazidis. And there have been 73 genocide campaigns against them, says Dakhil. The latest, of course, is the one by ISIS.

It began in 2014. ISIS descended on the Yazidis. Those who could flee, fled. Younger people carried their elderly parents on their back. Often, they could not get very far. ISIS slaughtered the men (and others). They kidnapped and enslaved the girls and women, raping them. Little girls were raped in front of their parents. Etc., etc.

The usual depravity that mankind exhibits, and always has.

In her presentation, Dakhil showed a film of ISIS terrorists selling girls, in an auction. Why does this film exist? ISIS itself made it, in order to recruit volunteers. In order to entice them.

Many years ago, Anthony Daniels, the British doctor and writer, told me that the main reason so many young men were attracted to radical Islam had nothing to do with religion. It was the subjugation of women, especially for sexual purposes. As the years have gone by, I have seen the truth of this, more and more.

In 2014 (August), ISIS had tens of thousands of Yazidis trapped in the Sinjar Mountains. They were starving. The ISIS men were waiting them out. The only way to reach the Yazidis was by helicopter, and Vian Dakhil undertook a rescue mission (by helicopter). She and others distributed food and water. Yet they also tried to take some of the people away, to safety. These were children, the aged, and the sick.

Flying away, the helicopter crashed, because it was carrying too much weight. The pilot died. Many others were injured, including Dakhil.

She is doing better now, she tells me. At night, however, she sometimes feels severe pain.

I will not say too much more about the hell and depravity to which the Yazidis have been subjected. You can watch Dakhil’s presentation, if you like. But I will say one thing - a horrible thing - and please skip it, if you like. I will tell it in the next few paragraphs, and then I will have interview excerpts, which will be bullet-pointed.

ISIS had a female prisoner - a young mother - whom they starved for two days. On the third day, they gave her some food: some kind of meat, which satisfied her. Then they told her she had just eaten the flesh of her son, 18 months old.

About a month after hearing this, I was reading The Feast of the Goat, Mario Vargas Llosa’s novel of the Trujillo dictatorship (in the Dominican Republic). Trujillista sadists do the exact same thing in the novel. I have no doubt it happened in real life.

I have studied many dictatorships and terror movements. They do the same things, in every corner of the earth: electric shocks on genitals, etc. Genitals are a constant fixation.

Now, some excerpts from my interview with Vian Dakhil:

She was born in 1971, to a Yazidi family in Mosul. She would grow up there, in Mosul. Her actual last name is Saeed. Dakhil is her father’s name - but she is known to the world as “Vian Dakhil.” She has a bachelor’s degree in microbiology, and a master’s degree in immunology.

I ask her a question about identity. “Do you feel Iraqi?” She answers, “I am Yazidi, Kurdish, and Iraqi.” In that order? Yes, in that order.

Different Yazidis have different views of their identity. Many consider themselves Yazidi only.

Dakhil did not seek out politics, but politics sought out her. In 2007, she was teaching at a university in Mosul, and terrorists began to menace the city and her students. The Kurdish government asked her to take special responsibility for the minorities (such as the Yazidis). And thus began her political career.

Who were those terrorists? Al-Qaeda, she says. I tell her something: “Al-Qaeda, ISIS - I don’t care what you call them, or what they call themselves. They’re all the same to me.” That’s right, she answers. They are like reptiles, she says, that shed their skin. Periodically, they have a new skin and a new name, but it’s the same terrorist animal.

About 6,700 Yazidi girls and women were kidnapped by ISIS. “We were able to rescue 3,000 of them,” Dakhil says. How? And who is “we”? By “we,” she means the Kurdish government, and what they did was buy back the girls and women from ISIS. The others are still in captivity.

But ISIS is on its way out in that part of the world. So, as a consequence, is the assault on the Yazidis.

“The Yazidis have lost their trust in everyone, even their neighbors,” says Dakhil. “They don’t trust anyone anymore” - which is entirely understandable.

I ask Dakhil whether she favors the breakup of Iraq. What she favors is a confederation, she says. “The best solution for the country is to be like the Emirates: small states in one bigger state, where the small states have their own rules and characteristics.” “Would Baghdad have the final say?” I ask. Yes, says Dakhil.

And how many regions or statelets should there be? Dakhil says, “Kurdistan, and a region for the Sunnis, and a region for the Shiites, and Baghdad, alone.”

I tell her I’m going to ask what may be an insulting question: Is the Iraqi parliament a real parliament or a pretend one? “It’s an actual parliament,” she says, “and we are working, but the problems in the country are greater than we are.”

What can the U.S. do for the Yazidis? Three things, she says: Give us “cover security” (physical security, protection from the wolves). Provide humanitarian help. And prevail on the United Nations to designate what ISIS has done a genocide.

Finally, I ask her what she would like people to know. “We are fighting ISIS,” she says. “We are fighting the terrorists and the ideology. We are paying the price. But these terrorists and this ideology spread very quickly. If we don’t work together, they will arrive in Oslo and Paris and Berlin and everywhere else. We must unite against it. We must stand together.”

She is an exceptionally brave woman, Vian Dakhil. “The world depends on people like you,” I tell her. She smiles. “Maybe you can be a scientist later. After the crisis passes, you can go back to your microscope.” She smiles again.