Author Topic: Ebola: outbreak, Canadian/other response (merged)  (Read 30152 times)

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Offline PMedMoe

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2014, 07:52:15 »
I agree. I know if you are military you can't go. One of our members had a trip scheduled and was told no.

As in a personal trip?  Do they have family there?  Otherwise, I can't imagine being crazy/stupid/altruistic/suicidal enough to go there....   ???
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
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Offline Chief Stoker

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2014, 08:23:52 »
As in a personal trip?  Do they have family there?  Otherwise, I can't imagine being crazy/stupid/altruistic/suicidal enough to go there....   ???

They had a trip planned to go to Mount Kilimanjaro for some time. They thought it would ok since there had been no cases in that part of Africa. Military said no.
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Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2014, 08:33:42 »
I'm with The Economist on this one: the risk to the modern, rich, sophisticated West, with its excellent public health systems, is low. Our current response is media (and political) induced panic.

Banning flights is a terminally f'ing stupid idea ... unless you want to do a repeat of 9/11 on a long, long term basis: and that's equally f'ing dumb.

There IS an ebola crisis and we can and should, in our own self interest, do something to solve it ... that may involve sending CF personnel to Africa, not hiding, in fear, behind stupid half measures.

Fear, irrational media induced fear, is our enemy, not ebola.
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Offline George Wallace

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #28 on: October 14, 2014, 09:08:57 »
This interactive link from the Wall Street Journal shows the spread of Ebola (and interestingly enough, none of the cases reported in Canada exist).

http://graphics.wsj.com/maps/ebolas-deadly-reach?mod=e2fb
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Offline George Wallace

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #29 on: October 14, 2014, 09:21:44 »
In world economics, prepare to see your sweet tooth cost you more:


Reproduced under the Fair Dealings provisions of the Copyright Act.

Quote
Ebola threatens chocolate

Politico Pro
By BILL TOMSON | 10/12/14 7:05 AM EDT Updated: 10/13/14 10:10 AM EDT

Ebola is threatening much of the world’s chocolate supply.

Ivory Coast, the world’s largest producer of cacao, the raw ingredient in M&M’s, Butterfingers and Snickers Bars, has shut down its borders with Liberia and Guinea, putting a major crimp on the workforce needed to pick the beans that end up in chocolate bars and other treats just as the harvest season begins. The West African nation of about 20 million — also known as Côte D’Ivoire — has yet to experience a single case of Ebola, but the outbreak already could raise prices.

The world’s chocolate makers have taken notice.

The World Cocoa Foundation is working now to collect large donations from Nestlé, Mars and many of its 113 other members for its Coca Industry Response to Ebola Initiative. The initiative hasn’t been publicly unveiled, but the WCF plans to announce details Wednesday, during its annual meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark, on how the money will fuel Red Cross and Caritas Internationalis work to help the infected and staunch Ebola’s spread.

Morristown, N.J.-based Transmar Group, an international cocoa supplier, already has pledged $100,000, and Mars has indicated its support, too.

“As a member of the WCF and a supporter of the CocoaAction strategy, Mars is pleased to see the industry coming together to help organizations on the ground in the prevention and eradication of the Ebola virus,” the company said in a statement provided to POLITICO. “We look forward to the WCF partnership meeting in Copenhagen next week where we will learn more about the industry effort.”

Ivory Coast, which produces about 1.6 million metric tons of cacao beans per year — roughly 33 percent of the world’s total, according to data from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization — closed its borders in August to Guinea and Liberia. More than 8,000 have been diagnosed with Ebola, and nearly 4,000 have died in those two countries and Sierra Leone. Next to Ivory Coast is Ghana, the world’s third-largest producer of cacao beans — 879,348 metric tons per year — or 15 percent of the world’s total.

Tim McCoy, a senior adviser for the WCF, said signs that Ivory Coast residents already are concerned were immediately obvious during his last trip to the country in September.

“Going into meetings where … you always shake hands and often times, with men and women, you do the cheek kiss thing … They weren’t doing that,” McCoy said.

The market is worried, too. Prices on cocoa futures jumped from their normal trading range of $2,000 to $2,700 per ton, to as high as $3,400 in September over concerns about the spread of Ebola to Côte D’Ivoire, noted Jack Scoville, an analyst and vice president at the Chicago-based Price Futures Group. Since then, prices have yo-yoed down to $3,030 and then back to $3,155 in the past couple of weeks.




More on LINK.
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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #30 on: October 14, 2014, 09:35:18 »
Ever looked at the symptoms of Ebola? Basically the same symptoms of influenza. Everyone is just paranoid and hypervigiliant that anything remotely "ebola-like" gets media attention.
According to the WHO and others, it sounds pretty hard to catch Ebola unless you're in very close contact w/someone who's pretty sick already:
Quote
.... Infection occurs from direct contact through broken skin or mucous membranes with the blood, or other bodily fluids or secretions (stool, urine, saliva, semen) of infected people. Infection can also occur if broken skin or mucous membranes of a healthy person come into contact with environments that have become contaminated with an Ebola patient’s infectious fluids such as soiled clothing, bed linen, or used needles ....
The CDC's take:
Quote
.... Ebola is not spread through casual contact; therefore, the risk of an outbreak in the U.S. is very low. We know how to stop Ebola’s further spread: thorough case finding, isolation of ill people, contacting people exposed to the ill person, and further isolation of contacts if they develop symptoms ....
Finally, Health Canada....
Quote
Ebola can be spread through:
- contact with infected animals (bats, monkeys, gorillas, pigs, etc.)
- contact with blood, body fluids or tissues of infected persons
- contact with medical equipment, such as needles, contaminated with infected body fluids
All that said, have to agree with you and E.R.C. on this bit:
Our current response is media (and political) induced panic.
No pun intended, but if it bleeds, it leads ....
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Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2014, 09:36:03 »
That's right George it is chocolate, not Canada, that is threatened.

The panic would be funny if it wasn't infecting so many otherwise apparently (moderately) intelligent people. Between CNN which needs these sorts of false crises to keep the advertising dollars flowing and the absolutely collossaly stupid and irresponsible wing of the US Republican Party, which wants to use anything to bash the black man in the White House, the serious, but local (to Africa) problem has been blown into a global crisis.

Now, don't get me wrong: this is a crisis ... in Africa. We have both a moral duty and a socio-economic/political interest in helping to stem and solve the crisis. We may need to deploy troops - engineers, mainly, and civilian public health workers and contractors to help address the crisis. There are useful things we can do ... stopping air travel isn't one of them.
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2014, 11:18:54 »
I am going to disagree, Ebola in it's current form is really nasty bug to fight and our healthcare system while not bad is not designed to deal with pandemics. Remember http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic ? Ebola ha infected more people in the last few months than in it's entire known history, the virus will mutate into what we don't know.
The cost of maintaining control of even a few patients and the healthcare staff is staggering. I suspect the disease will establish in the US and get into the homeless population through ER contact and become incredibly difficult to stamp out. It is the incubation period that is the disease's strongest point and exploits our weaknesses. People will get infected without knowing, move a significant distance and then infect others, so you will have hotspots popping up everywhere.

In theory Canada is at minimal risk as long as the disease does not take hold in the US, then all bets are off. The main defense at the healthcare end is to re-direct anyone with possible symptoms away from ER rooms to specialized ER's. I would prepare specialized ATCO type trailers, with a easy to clean UV equipped receiving room, with filtered air exhaust. The staff portion is sealed from the receiving room and staff can triage incoming patients with no direct contact reducing risks of infection and transmission throughout the hospital (and significant costs). From the Triage room, suspected patients are taken by a stripped down ambulance (again sealed from driver) to a designated hospital with a sectioned off area setup to treat and isolate potential carriers. Currently ER's see significant amounts of transient , drug users and homeless people, you really want to prevent the virus from getting into that crowd or it will be all over the city in a flash.   

Offline Remius

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2014, 11:44:57 »
Sorry Colin but you are comparing apples and oranges.  Ebola is not airborne like the flu or SARS.  Our hospitals are actually well placed in dealing with an ebola patient.  basically if you have an isolation ward, you can contain it.  Most of our hospitals actually do have isolation wards.  If Ebola was actually airborne it would be a whole diffrent ball game but as it is, it is much harder to contract.  The reason it is spreading so fast in Africa is lack of education, mistrust and very poor health care facilities.  Not to mention cultural norms in regards to dealing with bodies during funeral rites etc etc.   You can barely teach some people how to use a condom let alone explain to them how to deal with Ebola.
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2014, 12:12:42 »
We will lose the battle in the ER waiting rooms, not the isolation rooms. The disease in the early stages mimics the flu making false positives a much more likely event and lower attentiveness. The disease can linger on hard surfaces in a cool environment for up to 72hrs. Take note that a nurse in isolation gear was infected, likely from improper undressing. one infected person spending a couple of hours in a waiting room can infect a whole host of people with no one the wiser for days or even a week.   

Offline Remius

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2014, 12:38:18 »
We will lose the battle in the ER waiting rooms, not the isolation rooms. The disease in the early stages mimics the flu making false positives a much more likely event and lower attentiveness. The disease can linger on hard surfaces in a cool environment for up to 72hrs. Take note that a nurse in isolation gear was infected, likely from improper undressing. one infected person spending a couple of hours in a waiting room can infect a whole host of people with no one the wiser for days or even a week.   

I would agree with you if this was Africa.   But it isn't.  Yes it can linger in blood and other secretions on surfaces for that time period.  Contracting it through casual contact is extremely rare.  Because of its secondary infection rates it is much easier to contain.  The flu has something like 17 for secondary infection rates compared to Ebola which is 1.3-1.8 and with it's 2 week incubation period containing it is much easier.    the closest thing that I can think of as far as transmission is concerned would be Rabies.  There are only one or two cases a year in the US resulting in death but 55 000 anually in asia and africa.  Mind you it isn't hemoragic fever but it spread through infected saliva, blood etc and can be misdiagnosed as something else.

one infected person could infect anyone if they bleed, puke or sneeze and that other person got it in open wounds, mouth eyes or mucus membranes.  When someone bleeds or vomist in an ER they don't just leave it there to be touched by anyone.  again, it isn't airborne like the flu where yes, an ER can become full of infected people.
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Offline Remius

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #36 on: October 14, 2014, 13:12:53 »
We also have to consider that in the US and Canada, contact tracing is much more developped than in Africa where, i think it is damned near impossible to conduct effectively.
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Offline Chief Stoker

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #37 on: October 14, 2014, 13:15:26 »
Yesterday I heard some discussion on the formation of a multinational rapid reaction force specifically tailored to contain and eliminate viral outbreaks. Perhaps if we had something in place the crisis in Africa wouldn't of gotten so far.
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Offline medicineman

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #38 on: October 14, 2014, 13:22:05 »
I think one of our docs put it rather succinctly last night at work when someone was going on about being worried about Ebola - "I'd be more worried about the kid here with Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease than the one with Ebola, since it (HFMD) is about 300 times more infectious".

 :2c:

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Offline George Wallace

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #39 on: October 14, 2014, 13:47:04 »
In the 'Security Concerns Department'; there are some who would like to call for extreme measures and block all transit into and out of infected areas.  That is a rather simple thought, but would only cause migrants, healthy or sick, to use "underground" routes to 'escape' the blockades.  These clandestine travelers would pose more of a risk than those travelling through terminals that are monitoring the infection.

World wide pandemics have happened in the past decade or so.  We have witnessed the fears over the 'Bird Flu' and been able to contain it.  We also have seen more virulent infectious diseases, including the common flu cause deaths in our country that greatly outnumber those potential deaths this threat may pose.

I have heard that the Canadian Government has already developed a vaccine that they are going to test on forty volunteers in the US.

Canada's Ebola vaccine: How does it work?
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #40 on: October 14, 2014, 14:04:37 »
We also have to consider that in the US and Canada, contact tracing is much more developed than in Africa where, i think it is damned near impossible to conduct effectively.

Agreed it is better, but the events in Dallas shows that it is only as good as the person on the receiving end and that was with a person who had a distinct history. You get an infected person that does not know they have it and did not travel there, but picked it up say from the Paris International Airport and it is likely they will also get misdiagnosed.

As for quarantine, it does work and has worked in the past. 

Offline Remius

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #41 on: October 14, 2014, 14:43:08 »
Agreed it is better, but the events in Dallas shows that it is only as good as the person on the receiving end and that was with a person who had a distinct history. You get an infected person that does not know they have it and did not travel there, but picked it up say from the Paris International Airport and it is likely they will also get misdiagnosed.

As for quarantine, it does work and has worked in the past.

Misdiagnosis is definitly a risk but consider this.  Ebola is contagious when symptoms start showing such as fever, vomiting etc.  It has a two week incubation period.  So even if someone slipped through the cracks eventually they will need hospitalisation.  they will likely suspect malaria or even a severe case of the flu in which case the same isolation protocols that exist for ebola are enacted.  When testing comes back positive for Ebola you still have time to track down anyone that that specific patient had contact with.  So we might see a cluster where some secondary or possibly tertiary infection might occur it would most likely be stopped at that point given the incubation period.  Close contact would in almost all cases be family and easily tracked. 

If you caught something at the Paris airport it would have been something significant, like vomit or bleeding.  Something airpiort authorities are on the look out for even in a non-ebola emergency situation.

Emergency workers are always at higher risk for obvious reasons, so a nurse in dallas catching it is not surprising and by all accounts she was contained.

You have more to worry about with rabbies, Hep C and a whole host of stuff.  More people will die this year from the flu than any ebola oubreak here will.  Ebola is indeed scary and horrible but only if you live in a place like Africa where it is an almost garanteed death sentence.
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #42 on: October 14, 2014, 16:21:14 »
I remain quite unconvinced about how good our procedures are for this and when this takes off in Africa, it will bleed into Southern Europe first and if it gets into Central America we have at least 2 mass vectors for it to arrive. 

The people I have talked who go regularly to Serra Leone to give medical aid have little good to say about the WHO and their figures, so likley the WHO is/has been under reporting by a significant amount.

http://www.news1130.com/2014/10/14/who-official-there-could-be-up-to-10000-new-cases-of-ebola-per-week-in-2-months/
GENEVA – The death rate in the Ebola outbreak has risen to 70 per cent and there could be up to 10,000 new cases a week in two months, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday.

WHO assistant director-general Dr. Bruce Aylward gave the grim figures during a news conference in Geneva. Previously, WHO had estimated the death rate at around 50 per cent.

Aylward said the 70 per cent death rate was “a high mortality disease” in any circumstance and that the U.N. health agency was still focused on trying to get sick people isolated and provide treatment as early as possible.

He told reporters that if the world’s response to the Ebola crisis isn’t stepped up within 60 days, “a lot more people will die” and there will be a huge need to deal with the spiraling numbers of cases.

For the last four weeks, there’s been about 1,000 new cases per week — including suspected, confirmed and probable cases, he said, adding that the U.N. health agency is aiming to get 70 per cent of cases isolated within two months to reverse the outbreak.

WHO increased its Ebola death toll tally to 4,447 people on Tuesday, nearly all of them in West Africa, from 8,914 cases.

Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia have been hardest hit nations in the current outbreak. Aylward said WHO was very concerned about the continued spread of Ebola in the three countries’ capital cities —Freetown, Conakry and Monrovia.

He said the agency was still focused on trying to treat Ebola patients, despite the huge demands on the broken health systems in West Africa.

“It would be horrifically unethical to say that we’re just going to isolate people,” he said, noting that new strategies like handing out protective equipment to families and setting up very basic clinics — without much treatment — was a priority.

In Berlin, a U.N. medical worker infected with Ebola in Liberia died despite “intensive medical procedures.” The St. Georg hospital in Leipzig said Tuesday that the 56-year-old man, whose name has not been released, died overnight of the infection.

The man tested positive for Ebola on Oct. 6, prompting Liberia’s U.N. peacekeeping mission to place 41 other staff members under “close medical observation.”

He arrived in Leipzig for treatment on Oct. 9. The hospital’s chief executive, Dr. Iris Minde, said at the time there was no risk of infection for other people, since he was kept in a secure isolation ward specially equipped with negative pressure rooms that are hermetically sealed.

He was the third Ebola patient to be flown to Germany for treatment. The first man recovered and returned home to Senegal. A Uganda aid worker is still being treated in Frankfurt.


Offline Chief Stoker

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #43 on: October 14, 2014, 16:33:29 »
I would be more worried that ISIS or some other Terrorist group, intentionally infect some of its members and send them to North America. Lots of panic would be created and they are willing to die for their beliefs.
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #44 on: October 14, 2014, 17:02:57 »
Not sure that death is "clean enough" to convince people, going out in a blaze of glory is one thing, but puking your guts out in agony slowly might be a hard sell.

Offline Brad Sallows

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #45 on: October 14, 2014, 18:44:05 »
Most really excellent crises have sharp inflection points.  The likelihood of the crisis is pooh-poohed and argued away until the Day After.  Almost by definition, crises are never seen coming because no one wishes to see them.

>I'm more worried about the 80 little johnny jhaids that have apparently come back to Canada than I am about ebola.

As already noted, I'd be mostly worried about Johnny Jihadi with citizenship or a Canadian passport who took a detour to be smuggled in and out of a hot zone (no passport stamps) with the single intention of trying to acquire something and get back into Canada while asymptomatic.
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #46 on: October 15, 2014, 14:39:14 »
Meanwhile

An email sent out to the Alcon staff by its CEO reportedly said that the ebola nurse’s boyfriend was admitted into hospital with “Ebola-like symptoms.”

Gotnews.com has received word from two different Alcon employees, both of whom asked not to be identified.

Alcon’s U.S. headquarters are in Fort Worth, Texas. It is an ophthalmological pharmaceutical company.

Requests for comment from Alcon were not returned.

    So, parents work at Alcon and so does Nina Pham's boyfriend.. He's now in quarantine

and......



    DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – The CDC has announced that the second healthcare worker diagnosed with Ebola — now identified as Amber Joy Vinson of Dallas — traveled by air Oct. 13, the day before she first reported symptoms.

    The CDC is now reaching out to all passengers who flew on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth. The flight landed at 8:16 p.m. CT.

    The CDC is asking all 132 passengers on the flight to call 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636). Public health professionals will begin interviewing passengers about the flight after 1 p.m. ET.


and......

Nurses Union Head: 'No Protocols' at Dallas Hospital

Among some of the more serious allegations made by the union were that Duncan was not immediately isolated when he was admitted to the hospital with Ebola symptoms and that the protective gear they initially wore left their necks exposed.

When Duncan was admitted, he was "left for several hours, not in isolation, in an area where other patients were present," Burger told CNN.

As many as seven other patients were in that area, the nurses told the union.

When a nursing supervisor demanded that Duncan be moved to an isolation unit, she faced resistance from hospital officials, the nurses told the union.

In addition, when the nurses treating Duncan complained that their necks had not been covered by the gear, they were told to wrap their necks with medical tape, Burger told CNN.

Hazardous waste also piled up while Duncan was being treated, Burger said, and nurses got no "hands-on training" on how to use the protective gear.

"There was no one to pick up hazardous waste as it piled to the ceiling," Burger told CNN. "They did not have access to proper supplies."

In addition, "There was no mandate for nurses to attend training," Burger added.

Hospital officials did send nursing staff an email about a seminar on Ebola, however.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #47 on: October 18, 2014, 16:24:44 »
Jerry Pournell provide a roundup of Ebola related events; the picture is not reassuring at all:

http://www.jerrypournelle.com/chaosmanor/a-new-ebola-czar-military-deploys-to-plague-zone-competence-in-government/

Quote
A New Ebola Czar; Military deploys to plague zone. Competence in government.
  By Jerry Pournelle | October 17, 2014 - 1:16 pm | Updated: October 17, 2014 - 11:04 pm | View
View 846 Friday, October 17, 2014

“I have observed over the years that the unintended consequences of social action are always more important, and usually less agreeable, than the intended consequences.”

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“Transparency and the rule of law will be the touchstones of this presidency.”

President Barack Obama, January 31, 2009

 
“We had been told, on leaving our native soil, that we were going to defend the sacred rights conferred on us by so many of our citizens settled overseas, so many years of our presence, so many benefits brought by us to populations in need of our assistance and our civilization.

“We were able to verify that all this was true, and because it was true, we did not hesitate to shed our quota of blood, to sacrifice our youth and our hopes. We regretted nothing, but whereas we over here are inspired by this frame of mind, I am told that in Rome factions and conspiracies are rife, that treachery flourishes, and that many people in their uncertainty and confusion lend a ready ear to the dire temptations of relinquishment and even to vilify our actions.

“I cannot believe that all this is true, and yet recent wars have shown how pernicious such a state of mind could be and to where it could lead.

“Make haste to reassure us, I beg you, and tell us that our fellow citizens understand us, support us, and protect us as we ourselves are protecting the glory of the Empire.

“If it should be otherwise, if we should have to leave our bleached bones on these desert sands in vain, then beware the fury of the Legions.”


Centurion Marcus Flavinius, Second Cohort, Augusta Legion to his cousin Tertullus in Rome.  No date given.

http://www.jerrypournelle.com/archives2/archives2view/view414.html#Fury

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The premise of the liberal philosophy is that good intentions are the most important qualification for government office, and government is more competent to solve social problems than any other institution. Today President Barrack Hussein Obama appointed a political operative to be “Ebola Czar.”

Obama to Tap Former VP Chief of Staff Ron Klain as Ebola ‘Czar’
President Barack Obama will appoint Ron Klain to head up efforts to address the Ebola threat, a senior administration official tells NBC News.

Klain is a former chief of staff to both Vice President Joe Biden and former Vice President Al Gore. He left the vice president’s office in 2011. He is now the president of Case Holdings and serves as the general counsel for Revolution, an investment organization.

"It’s not solely a medical response," White House press secretary Josh Earnest said. "That’s why somebody with Mr. Klain’s credentials — somebody that has strong management experience both inside government but also in the private sector; he is somebody who has strong relationships with members of Congress; and obviously strong relationships with those of us who worked with him here at the White House earlier in the administration. All of that means that he is the right person."

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/ebola-virus-outbreak/obama-tap-former-vp-chief-staff-ron-klain-ebola-czar-n228151

I cannot resist wondering whether his association with Al Gore was thought to be qualification for a post involving scientific observations. Chief of Staff to Al Gore and Joe Biden.

 

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Ebola Scare at Pentagon After Woman Who Was Recently in Africa Vomits on Tour Bus
http://washington.cbslocal.com/2014/10/17/ebola-scare-at-pentagon-after-woman-who-was-recently-in-africa-vomits-on-tour-bus/

Around 9:10 a.m., a woman began vomiting in the Pentagon parking lot while on a bus tour, according to Pentagon spokeswoman Lt. Col. Valerie Henderson. The woman indicated she has recently traveled to Africa.

DC Dept Health Director says woman who got sick on bus had been to Sierra Leon.

 
This picture taken 26 December 2011 shows the Pentagon building in Washington, DC.  The Pentagon, which is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense (DOD), is the world's largest office building by floor area, with about 6,500,000 sq ft (600,000 m2), of which 3,700,000 sq ft (340,000 m2) are used as offices.  Approximately 23,000 military and civilian employees and about 3,000 non-defense support personnel work in the Pentagon. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STAFF/AFP/Getty Images)
 
That one, at least, is not a problem: she has since confessed that she has not recently been in Africa, and physicians are confident that she does not have Ebola.  Of course the Pentagon would not be a target of Ebolized jihad.
 

Belize Confirms Patient With Ebola Symptoms On Cruise Ship Off Its Coast
http://belizean.com/belize-confirms-patient-with-ebola-symptoms-on-cruise-ship-off-its-coast-1814/


Six Reasons to Panic
By JONATHAN V. LAST

http://www.weeklystandard.com/articles/six-reasons-panic_816387.html?nopager=1#

As a rule, one should not panic at whatever crisis has momentarily fixed the attention of cable news producers. But the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, which has migrated to both Europe and America, may be the exception that proves the rule. There are at least six reasons that a controlled, informed panic might be in order.

(1) Start with what we know, and don’t know, about the virus. Officials from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and other government agencies claim that contracting Ebola is relatively difficult because the virus is only transmittable by direct contact with bodily fluids from an infected person who has become symptomatic. Which means that, in theory, you can’t get Ebola by riding in the elevator with someone who is carrying the virus, because Ebola is not airborne.

This sounds reassuring. Except that it might not be true. There are four strains of the Ebola virus that have caused outbreaks in human populations. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, the current outbreak (known as Guinean EBOV, because it originated in Meliandou, Guinea, in late November 2013) is a separate clade “in a sister relationship with other known EBOV strains.” Meaning that this Ebola is related to, but genetically distinct from, previous known strains, and thus may have distinct mechanisms of transmission.

Not everyone is convinced that this Ebola isn’t airborne. Last month, the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy published an article arguing that the current Ebola has “unclear modes of transmission” and that “there is scientific and epidemiologic evidence that Ebola virus has the potential to be transmitted via infectious aerosol particles both near and at a distance from infected patients, which means that healthcare workers should be wearing respirators, not facemasks.”

In August, Science magazine published a survey conducted by 58 medical professionals working in African epidemiology. They traced the origin and spread of the virus with remarkable precision—for instance, they discovered that it crossed the border from Guinea into Sierra Leone at the funeral of a “traditional healer” who had treated Ebola victims. In just the first six months of tracking the virus, the team identified more than 100 mutated forms of it.

Yet what’s really scary is how robust the already-established transmission mechanisms are. Have you ever wondered why Ebola protocols call for washing down infected surfaces with chlorine? Because the virus can survive for up to three weeks on a dry surface.

How robust is transmission? Look at the health care workers who have contracted it. When Nina Pham, the Dallas nurse who was part of the team caring for Liberian national Thomas Duncan, contracted Ebola, the CDC quickly blamed her for “breaching protocol.” But to the extent that we have effective protocols for shielding people from Ebola, they’re so complex that even trained professionals, who are keenly aware that their lives are on the line, can make mistakes.

By the by, that Science article written by 58 medical professionals tracing the emergence of Ebola—5 of them died from Ebola before it was published.

(2) General infection rates are terrifying, too. In epidemiology, you measure the “R0,” or “reproduction number” of a virus; that is, how many new infections each infected person causes. When R0 is greater than 1, the virus is spreading through a population. When it’s below 1, the contamination is receding. In September the World Health Organization’s Ebola Response Team estimated the R0 to be at 1.71 in Guinea and 2.02 in Sierra Leone. Since then, it seems to have risen so that the average in West Africa is about 2.0. In September the WHO estimated that by October 20, there would be 3,000 total cases in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. As of October 7, the count was 8,376.

Given that this is in the neoconservative magazine Weekly Standard I doubt if Mr. Klain has read it, but perhaps someone on his staff with access to the Czar will encounter it. The rest of the article is worth your time. Five of the 58 medical professionals involved in the Science Magazine study died of Ebola before the paper was published.

U.S. Soldiers Get Just Four Hours of Ebola Training
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/10/17/u-s-soldiers-get-just-four-hours-of-ebola-training.html

As the U.S. military rushes to combat Ebola in West Africa, soldiers are receiving on-the-fly instructions on how to protect themselves against the deadly virus.

American military operations to fight Ebola in Africa are unfolding quickly—forcing the military to come up with some procedures and protocols on the fly.

Soldiers preparing for deployment to West Africa are given just four hours of Ebola-related training before leaving to combat the epidemic. And the first 500 soldiers to arrive have been holing up in Liberian hotels and government facilities while the military builds longer-term infrastructure on the ground.

For soldiers at Fort Campbell and Fort Bragg preparing for their deployments to West Africa, Mobile Training Teams from the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), based out of Fort Detrick, have been tasked with instructing them on Ebola protocols.

A team of two can train as many as 50 personnel over that four-hour time frame, USAMRIID told The Daily Beast. The training includes hands-on instruction on how to put on, remove, and decontaminate personal protective equipment, followed by a practical test to ensure that soldiers understand the procedures.

“All training is tiered to the level of risk each person may encounter,” said USAMRIID spokeswoman Caree Vander Linden.

The training process sounds daunting: One USA Today report described soldiers being told that Ebola “basically causes your body to eat itself from the inside out” and that Ebola is “worse” than what soldiers encountered in Afghanistan. Others reportedly heard that the disease is “catastrophic” and “frightening… with a high fatality rate,” though the chances of contracting it are low.

“I’ll be honest with you,” one soldier told the newspaper. “I’m kind of scared.” [emphasis added]

* – * – *

Soldiers based in Liberia have their temperature measured several times per day, and are not permitted to shake hands.

The military maintains that American service members have only limited interactions with locals on the ground. But some American soldiers are working with the Armed Forces of Liberia on a day-to-day basis, and others are training health-care providers on how to combat the virus.

Further, the military acknowledges that it is currently sharing hotels and businesses with foreign nationals.

"We are here with the permission of the Liberian government and we do not clear out local hotels and businesses during our stay," said an Army spokesman. "We chose hotels with the safety of our service members in mind, and the hotel staffs monitor all employees and guests and allow us to conduct safety inspections of their facilities to ensure they meet our safety criteria."

Instead, the military spokesman focused on the precautions that they are already taking: Soldiers based in Liberia have their temperature measured several times per day, and are not permitted to shake hands. They are also are required to frequently wash their hands with a chlorine solution. Some locations even employ chlorine mats that service members are required to wipe their feet on in order to enter.

“The facilities that we’re in have been vetted by our doctors. [They] have gone through the facilities to make sure that they’re safe for our soldiers,” Army spokesman Lt. Col. Michael Indovina said. “We’re very confident. We’ve had very good luck from the time when we’ve arrived on the ground.”

Congress has been slow to give the green light to funding for military operations combating Ebola in Africa, in large part due to initial skepticism over whether there was a sufficient plan for protecting American service members in Liberia.

In mid-September, the Obama administration submitted a $1 billion request for Ebola funding. The request was for a movement of leftover funds from an overseas war spending account, requiring a sign-off from several key congressional figures.

When the Obama administration briefed staffers of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Sept. 19, it was criticized for not adequately explaining what steps the military would take to ensure soldiers’ health.

“If they had bio-security procedures in place, they weren’t adequately articulating them to Congress,” said an aide to Sen. Jim Inhofe, the top-ranking Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee. “When they first came over, they were not able to answer a lot of questions about what procedures were in place.”

Of course it was not long ago that high government officials assured us that any decent hospital in the United States would be able to care for Ebola patients. Yesterday Nina Pham, the first American known to have contracted Ebola in the United States, was taken out of her hospital where, as a nurse, she contracted Ebola, and was sent to Bethesda. Her condition, previously reported to be “good” has now been downgraded to “fair”. Unlike typhus and cholera, Ebola basically turns internal organs to liquid and expels them through diarrhea. There is no known treatment, although there is empirical evidence that the plasma of Ebola survivors can be effective. Experimental drugs but not plasma was given to Mr. Duncan, from whom Ms. Pham contracted Ebola; he subsequently died.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline S.M.A.

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Canada to ship experimental Ebola vaccine to WHO in Geneva
« Reply #48 on: October 19, 2014, 19:55:28 »
Canada's role...

Reuters

Quote
Canada to ship experimental Ebola vaccine to WHO in Geneva
Sat Oct 18, 2014 2:02pm EDT

TORONTO (Reuters) - The Canadian government will ship 800 vials of its experimental Ebola vaccine to the World Health Organization in Geneva beginning on Monday, the Public Health Agency of Canada said on Saturday.

The WHO, in consultation with health authorities in the countries most affected by the outbreak of the disease, will decide on how the vaccine will be distributed and used, the agency said in a statement.

The vaccine is undergoing clinical trials on humans at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in the United States after showing promising results in animal testing, it said.

(...SNIPPED)

Our Country
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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
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Offline Remius

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Re: Ebola -- International Security Measures Fail
« Reply #49 on: October 20, 2014, 08:17:43 »
And, it would seem the outbreak can be contained if proper measures, even in a developping country, are implemented.  All without shutting borders.

Nigeria and Senegal are Ebola free, 48 people that had contact with the US case (the one that died) have been cleared.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/20/health/ebola-outbreak-roundup/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

The problem lies with countries like Liberia and Sierra Leone where superstition, distrust and overall crappy conditions have led to a massive outbreak.  The US and Canada (two countries that are light years ahead of Nigeria and Senegal's health care systems) may see a few isolated cases but will not see the same levels.

More people will die from the flu, so get your shot, stay calm and carry on.
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