Author Topic: Truth Duty Valour  (Read 68746 times)

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Offline oak7

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2004, 17:45:00 »
hmmm, is it only me, or at 6pmEST on OLN some show other than Truth duty valour played????  anybody want to fill me in, when it did play, or when i can catch ep. 2 again

Offline Ex-Dragoon

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2004, 17:52:00 »
They are a dream to fire, no problems with stoppages and will eat any 9mm you feed it. I love being boarding party. I do wish they would coach the guys speaking though, they look hestiant for the speaking roles for whick they were assigned to.
I will leave your flesh on the mountains and fill the valleys with your carcasses. I will water the land with what flows from you, and the river beds shall be filled with your blood. When I snuff you out I will cover the heavens and all the stars will darken. Ezekiel 32:5-7
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Offline Sierra Kilo

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2004, 18:40:00 »
You mean the "sir, open the door and come out!"?

I thought that the episode was informative, but I would like to know more about the rules of engagement for boarding parties.  
  Do NBPs operate as strictly as a police tactical unit would, with respect to preserving the lives and rights of the suspects/hostile resistors , or are they more aggressive and ‘militant‘ when dealing with dangerous opponents?

Offline bobthebui|der

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2004, 18:44:00 »
yah kirk, i was wondering the same thing while i watched it.
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Offline Ex-Dragoon

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2004, 21:51:00 »
When we are about to board a ship....we have the ship‘s master place the crew where they can be clearly seen on the upper decks where they can be covered by our parent unit and if available a helicopter. Obviously some members of the ships company have to remain at their stations like an engineer and 1 or 2 on the bridge. When all the ships company is accounted for then we board. Upon boarding and the securing of key areas onboard the ship then a search is done of the ship. Not knowing the scenario this boarding party was given I can‘t say why they did it the way they did so but on my two deployments to the Gulf in ‘01 and ‘02 we entered the room tactically, not this quick look stuff close the door and then the  "sir, open the door and come out!"? We went in fast and hard. All personnel encountered are treated fairly and with dignity as much as possible and yes we addressed them as sir. For the most part these guys are 3rd world sailors who have not seen their family in a year if not longer and when they see a bunch of armed uniformed guys with weapons they are terrifed and 9 out of 10 times are very co-operative.
Kirk to answer your question different situations called for different rules of engagement but the main one that was important to us was our right to self defence. So far our training has paid off, we have not lost a boarding party member or have killed anyone on vessels we have boarded so that shows the training works.
I will leave your flesh on the mountains and fill the valleys with your carcasses. I will water the land with what flows from you, and the river beds shall be filled with your blood. When I snuff you out I will cover the heavens and all the stars will darken. Ezekiel 32:5-7
Tradition- Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid
Former RCN Sailor now Retired

Offline Sierra Kilo

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #30 on: January 10, 2004, 22:41:00 »
Thanks for the informative reply; that cleared it up for me.  I find nothing wrong with self defence, or the tradeoff of politeness for safety.

  :warstory:

Offline Enzo

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #31 on: January 15, 2004, 04:47:00 »
I enjoyed the way they showed some of those pers holding their Sig P225‘s (broken thumbs anyone). I‘m assuming that was a basic course and that other courses (including live fire training, etc...) are to follow? It seems interesting overall, but I‘m not quite ready to give up the Infantry life for ship life just yet, although living in Victoria is a bonus.

Bear in mind, I say that knowing that I‘m still not reenlisted. I‘m just maintaining my optimism that CFRC will smarten up at some point. Make for a nice surprise.
"Most people would rather analyse risks than take them"

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Offline Enzo

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #32 on: January 15, 2004, 04:57:00 »
Also, "We‘re like the S.E.A.L‘s...almost." Not an exact quote of the young sailor, but something like that. It‘s good to be confident in your skills, but what was that, an 18 day course? Uh. ok. Yep kiddo, you‘re just like that, when you‘re not glued to your monitor. And firing those guns is great fun. Until the day someone decides to send a few rounds back atcha. Then it‘s not quite so much fun anymore.
"Most people would rather analyse risks than take them"

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Offline Ex-Dragoon

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2004, 09:17:00 »
Having been through the course what the kid meant was to give the viewer a frame of reference for what we do. We are nowhere‘s nor will ever be close to the training a SEAL goes through but how do you explain Boarding Party to John Q. Public? He did alright for an AB and on camera on a show to be aired to millions of people.

Also the P225 is the only weapon we do a boarding which will have a round chambered. The MP5 and 870 will only do so when the fit hits the shan. The P225 will have a round chambered before we leave our ship and when a round is chambered the weapon must be decocked and the hammer seated. Checking the hammer with your thumb is just an added check to verify that the weapon is de-cocked. Trigger control was stressed and as it should be, we were taught not to go near the trigger unless you were about to squeeze it.

An Enzo as for you last comment firing guns is fun until a few rounds are sent back at you. I agree but I don‘t think it would be just the navy not to enjoy having rounds sent back at you. I doubt anyone in the army enjoys it very much either.

For sailors joining a boarding party is hard work but its different from your usual job and thats where a lot of the rush is.
I will leave your flesh on the mountains and fill the valleys with your carcasses. I will water the land with what flows from you, and the river beds shall be filled with your blood. When I snuff you out I will cover the heavens and all the stars will darken. Ezekiel 32:5-7
Tradition- Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid
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Offline kaspacanada

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2004, 18:16:00 »
Wow I wish we had a TV with cable in this house...or a TV at all for that matter...I gonna check online and if I can‘t find any, mabey order them on DVD or something.
What's right is a matter of perspective.   If you don't stand up for what is right by yours, then you fade away losing not only the respect of those around you, but your self-respect as well.

Offline Enzo

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #35 on: January 16, 2004, 01:34:00 »
Dragoon - I‘ll give you that about the kid and the camera. I know I‘m not much of a public speaker and he probably came across better than I would have.

As for the show itself. I noticed people thumbing the hammer from time to time. I figured something along those lines as they were usually appearing as though they were preparing to deploy. However, one female was supposed to be behind cover firing upon a combatant (she was using the red dummy gun) and as she was calling "bang, bang" her thumb was clearly behind the hammer as she was doing so. This suggested to me that live fire hadn‘t occured at this phase of the training. That‘s a habit that will be broken quickly with live ammunition (literally).

I also had to admit that while watching some of what was shown was easy to criticize from the couch. I agreed with the comment that for many, this was their first weapons handling since BMQ. In addition, most are not combat arms trained from the outset, so for technicians and support pers, they did well. It‘s the Infantry in me to speak out. Besides, we never were able to play w/ MP5‘s or P225‘s.  :D

What I‘d like to know is, was that a basic course or the full course? Is there a more intensive course that provides a mock up with simulated fire training? Either blanks, MILES, or simunitions? Something to get the pers used to actual fire in close quarters so that their first experience with that isn‘t in the field (or on a ship to be more precise)? As for the rounds back at you comment, difference is the training that the Infantry specializes in. Some may not like it, but by the time they deploy abroad, they should have enough simulated training to prep them for the real thing. Therein lies the difference. Then again, you can only train so much and hope for the rest. Sometimes courage comes from where it‘s least expected.
"Most people would rather analyse risks than take them"

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #36 on: January 16, 2004, 04:12:00 »
This was the Basic Course and as was stated last 18 days. Within those 18 days you get 5 days on the range of staright shooting and some minor tactical stuff. Nothing to what an infanteer goes through but enough to get you thinking about concealment and cover. You can‘t do section battle drills in the holds of too many ships anyways  :D . We don‘t see any MILES gear but do get to practice in the Small Arms Simulator. The drawback there is only 2 members can go through at any one time. The only onces that get an advanced course is the boarding party officer, the PO1 (2IC) and the witnessing officer. We also go through periodic team training where we practice procedures, empty hand control, tactics search procedures that type of thing. When we sail we also do range practices off the flight deck. Placing your thumb behind the hammer of a pistol and leaving it therer is definitely something they would only do once and learn the hardway but that comes with practice.
I will leave your flesh on the mountains and fill the valleys with your carcasses. I will water the land with what flows from you, and the river beds shall be filled with your blood. When I snuff you out I will cover the heavens and all the stars will darken. Ezekiel 32:5-7
Tradition- Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid
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Offline Enzo

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #37 on: January 16, 2004, 04:59:00 »
Thanks Drag. I can appreciate all of that. When I was toying with the idea of going to the navy as a MARS officer (primarily to keep me in Victoria, still may if I can ever get back in  :D  ) I always said that I‘d have to be involved with the boarding party to keep my adrenaline requirements satiated and my interest up. In the Reg Force, can you apply for both Ships Diver and Boarding Party, or is it a matter of only one? What about pilots, can they take either course? I‘d think that both would be, have to do something while the Sea King‘s in the hangar eh?  :D
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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #38 on: January 16, 2004, 06:38:00 »
We have people qualified for both but they can usually only do one or the other because it doesn‘t do the ship‘s company any good if one of the rescue divers is doing a boarding and you have a man overboard. None of the air detachment can go for either ships diver or NLBP.
I will leave your flesh on the mountains and fill the valleys with your carcasses. I will water the land with what flows from you, and the river beds shall be filled with your blood. When I snuff you out I will cover the heavens and all the stars will darken. Ezekiel 32:5-7
Tradition- Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid
Former RCN Sailor now Retired

Danny

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #39 on: January 18, 2004, 10:52:00 »
I like the show but I find it gets boring, they should talk about two different topics instead of just one.

Offline Yeoman

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #40 on: January 18, 2004, 19:38:00 »
my buddy is in the basic para one, can‘t wait to see his ugly mug on the TV so I can record it and sent it to him.
Greg
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Offline Mike Bobbitt

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #41 on: October 30, 2004, 10:48:10 »
Recently Colin McKeown, Producer of Truth Duty Valour invited me to his office to talk about the much anticipated second season.

Mike: A lot of folks I've talked to have seen some or all of season one. Given that many readers are already familiar with the series concept, what will they find new about season two?

Colin: Quite a bit actually. First, we have much better technology than last year. The cameras we're using provide better quality shots, and we have some interesting new gadgets. Helmet cams, boot cams and cameras capable of filming underwater to name a few. The camera crew are also more experienced and we're able to do things like dolly shots and POV shots to enhance the experience. This translates to a much more professional look and feel compared to last season.

The downside though is that while we're barely into second season shooting, we've already sustained over $5,000 in damaged equipment. The total loss last season was $8,000 for comparison.

Technology wasn't the only thing we've changed though. We're also trying to make the episodes more interesting by creating some continuity with the people we're filming. So instead of simply filming a company on exercise, or a particular course serial, we focus on a few individuals in that organization and follow them throughout the duration of the show. This gives the series a much more personal feeling. We typically try to select different types of individuals where possible. For example, in an episode about deploying overseas, we may pick a Reg Force Sgt. who's "been there, done that," and a Reserve Pte. who has never been on tour to provide as much variety as possible.

We've also tried to inject more history and background into the episodes. In the Pathfinder show, instead of just describing what the Pathfinders do today we trace their history back through to their origins. The intent is to give the viewer more context for the events they're watching.

Mike: It's been said that TDV isn't always well rounded in it's coverage. For example there was little or no Reservist representation and it seemed that Western Canada stole the spotlight last year.

Colin: It's true, last year we did spend a lot of time out West. That was primarily due to the fact that we had a better relationship with the CF out West than anywhere else in the country. This year however we've managed to build up a much better rapport with the other headquarters which translates into pretty even coverage. We also have two episodes that are devoted to the Reserves, who were admittedly not well represented last year.

Mike: Speaking of "rapport" how has your relationship with the CF been to date? Any differences between this season and last?

Colin: Definitely. Last season there was a lot of suspicion and hesitation, especially on the part of the Army. I think soldiers were reluctant to go in front of the camera because they didn't know how we would portray them. After seeing last season, things have changed a lot. People know we're not out to make them look bad or change the context of what they're saying. We try to focus on the positive, and edit out anything that seems like it would be inappropriate to air.

I think as a result of seeing how we portray things, this season the Army has been a lot more open and cooperative, from the top to the bottom. I believe that's going to translate into better coverage for them in the end.

This season, you'll be happy to know, the Army gets a bit more coverage than the other components. While the Air Force and Navy have lots of interesting things on the go, many Army activities lend themselves to this type of series. That is, more action oriented and less technical or equipment based in general.

Mike: Focusing on the positive aspects of the CF is likely a contributing factor to the show's success. Can you point to any other factors that you feel have made TDV so popular?

Colin: I try to remain faithful to the CF. I try to capture what they do, how they do it, and why we should be proud of them. And we should be proud of what they accomplish, given the resources they work with. They rely on skill, training and dedication - not kit - to get the job done.

Mike: What have your biggest challenges been in putting the show together?

Colin: It may sound odd, but mandatory leave has been a problem for us. Under this system, many soldiers are taking their block leave at the same time, usually in the summer. That forces a lot of training into the September-November time frame, which is a scheduling challenge for us. A lot of what we want to cover happens concurrently or in rapid succession. That doesn't leave us a lot of time to shoot an entire season of episodes and makes for a very busy shooting schedule.

It's also a challenge to make sure we're technically accurate, within available timelines and budgets. For example I've seen stock footage of an F16 inserted during a segment on CF-18s, or a shot of someone firing the M72 while the voiceover discussed the Carl Gustav. That type of thing is going to be spotted immediately by an audience like ours. A lot of military shows let this type of detail slip past, but having a military background helps me identify some of the obvious inaccuracies.

We also have an SME review the final cut for some shows, to make sure it's technically sound. For example we've invited a Capt. and a Sgt. instructor from the Pathfinder's course to review that episode. Granted, they'll be viewing the final cut for technical accuracy and suitability, not for artistic input, but I think it helps create a more realistic and seamless show in the end.

Mike: How much work goes into producing a single episode?

Colin: It varies from episode to episode, but generally we shoot 25-40 hours of video for each show. [Colin backed this up by showing me a stack of about 35 hours worth of tape for the Pathfinder episode.] We then have to distil all that footage down into a one hour show, which generally takes about 10 days of editing.

Mike: What does the episode list look like for season two?

Colin: Here is the full episode list:

Army Combat Divers
Op Celebration (Medic Competition)
HMCS Naniamo (Navy Reserves)
Non Combatant Evacuation (NEO with PPCLI)
SAREX (SAR Tech Competition)
Exercise Stalwart Guardian (Army Reserves)
HMCS Ville De Quebec (with SNFL)
Sea Kings (onboard HMCS Athabaskan)
Pathfinders
TALEX (Hercules Low Level Sustainment Drops)
Jungle Warfare Training
Training for Afghanistan (RCD/CER/RCR)
Aurora (War on Terrorism - Italy)

Mike: Sounds like you have some interesting topics lined up this season. What have your personal favourites been so far.

Colin: By far the Pathfinders. Those guys are hard core! But the Medic competition was also very cool. Very realistic, having to deal with scenarios from drunks to wounded soldiers with their guts hanging out.

Mike: Ok, I'm hooked. When does the new season start?

Colin: The exact date is TBD, but look for us in early January on Outdoor Life Network. The first episode covers Op Celebration, the Medic Competition.

Mike: I know the second season hasn't even aired yet, but do you have any long term plans for a third season? Or beyond?

Colin: Well that depends on a lot of things of course. To be honest, I don't see us going beyond four seasons in total regardless of what else happens. Anything more than that and I believe we would run out of good, solid content.

Mike: What other projects do you have in the works? Anything Army.ca visitors may be interested in.

Colin: Actually yes. I'm working on a couple of concepts that I believe will hold a lot of interest for Army.ca visitors, but unfortunately it's too early to provide any details.

Mike: I guess we'll have to save that for a future interview. Keep us posted, and thanks for your time.



Note: To read an interview conducted with Colin regarding TDV Season 1, click here.

Offline Scotty

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #42 on: October 30, 2004, 12:49:10 »
Glad to hear there will be a second season.  Nice work Mike.

Crazy_Eyes

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #43 on: October 30, 2004, 13:53:32 »
Sweeeet 8) I love this show, but I'm getting pretty bored with season 1, so season 2 will be good

Offline Alex252

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #44 on: October 30, 2004, 14:57:51 »
Good work mike! Cant wait to see the Stalwart Guardian episode
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Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2004, 21:04:46 »
Sounds like I'll see the crews out again for the "Training for Afghanistan" filming during OP Athena mission specifc training end Nov.
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Offline MrRGoyer

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #46 on: November 10, 2004, 19:57:42 »
NICE so glad to hear there is going to be a second season thr jungle warfare sounds mighty interesting well done on the interview :salute:
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Offline Bruce Monkhouse

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #47 on: November 10, 2004, 20:01:13 »
I take it he shot down :sniper: my "what are they doing after" idea? :-[
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Offline Mike Bobbitt

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #48 on: November 10, 2004, 20:04:26 »
Bruce, we're stuck in that boring spot between vets who fought for our freedom and those still serving. :)

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Re: Truth Duty Valour
« Reply #49 on: November 10, 2004, 20:23:42 »
Great interview, Mike! :)