Author Topic: Tablets  (Read 51492 times)

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Offline Old EO Tech

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Re: Tablets
« Reply #75 on: August 05, 2014, 01:43:43 »
BB is running on borrowed time at this point, and the Playbook is almost a year discontinued. I know that SSC is trialing BES 10 right now, as well as other 3rd party mobile manager software.

If I were a betting man I would say we'll see an end to the BB only policy within a couple of years as the ability to manage iOS and Android devices from an enterprise perspective is starting to be just as well developed as that for BB.

Once that happens you will see tablets, until then, anything you do see is just something a unit bought out of O&M without proper approval.

Well yes the Playbook is EoL but I still have one and it makes a fine ereader among other things.  But the demise of BB has been greatly exaggerated.  With BB10.3 coming out and BES 10/12 there is really no reason to not stay with the most secure system you can get, and the only one currently FIPS certified.  Most people have a bad taste with BB phones because DND buys the cheapest 5 year old curves that Rogers wants to off load on us :-/  My Z10 is as good as any iphone or android out their.  And if you want something closer to a tablet the Z30 is available.  And the new large business oriented BB Passport is about to hit the streets this fall.  And looks like a killer business phone.  But I'm sure some itoy loving exec at SSC will be pushing iphone6's soon and holding up a BBOS 6 curve as evidence :-/

Offline Pre-flight

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Re: Tablets
« Reply #76 on: August 05, 2014, 05:36:11 »
Well yes the Playbook is EoL but I still have one and it makes a fine ereader among other things.  But the demise of BB has been greatly exaggerated.  With BB10.3 coming out and BES 10/12 there is really no reason to not stay with the most secure system you can get, and the only one currently FIPS certified.  Most people have a bad taste with BB phones because DND buys the cheapest 5 year old curves that Rogers wants to off load on us :-/  My Z10 is as good as any iphone or android out their.  And if you want something closer to a tablet the Z30 is available.  And the new large business oriented BB Passport is about to hit the streets this fall.  And looks like a killer business phone.  But I'm sure some itoy loving exec at SSC will be pushing iphone6's soon and holding up a BBOS 6 curve as evidence :-/

Yes, given the 8 months since I made that post, it does seem that the current BB leadership is doing well, they've made the smart move of retreating from consumer products. They've lost the consumer market, at less than 3% they'll never have the critical mass to make more than a dent there. They are refocusing on business and enterprise customers. Essentially they're pulling an IBM move, which worked wonderfully for Big Blue.

Personally, from an IT standpoint, I really like BB. The phones have an incredibly robus and secure operating system (BB 10, derived from QNX) and it has a powerful management tool in BES.

That said, I'd never buy a blackberry phone as my personal phone, because all the cool new stuff comes out on iPhone and Android first.

Offline Old EO Tech

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Re: Tablets
« Reply #77 on: August 05, 2014, 20:55:59 »
Yes, given the 8 months since I made that post, it does seem that the current BB leadership is doing well, they've made the smart move of retreating from consumer products. They've lost the consumer market, at less than 3% they'll never have the critical mass to make more than a dent there. They are refocusing on business and enterprise customers. Essentially they're pulling an IBM move, which worked wonderfully for Big Blue.

Personally, from an IT standpoint, I really like BB. The phones have an incredibly robus and secure operating system (BB 10, derived from QNX) and it has a powerful management tool in BES.

That said, I'd never buy a blackberry phone as my personal phone, because all the cool new stuff comes out on iPhone and Android first.

Well you can run 95% of android apps on BB10 phones, only ones that require google services can't be run without some hacking.  I much prefer the swiping interface of BB10 to the home button centric iOS, but to each his own.


Offline Pre-flight

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Re: Tablets
« Reply #78 on: August 08, 2014, 09:44:44 »
Well you can run 95% of android apps on BB10 phones, only ones that require google services can't be run without some hacking.  I much prefer the swiping interface of BB10 to the home button centric iOS, but to each his own.

Yes BB10 can now run Android apps, and yes the OS is a better system, and yes, the hardware is superior to alot of android phones, and no, it won't make a difference and BlackBerry's market share of the consumer market will continue to fade.

Offline Old EO Tech

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Re: Tablets
« Reply #79 on: August 12, 2014, 22:34:19 »
Yes BB10 can now run Android apps, and yes the OS is a better system, and yes, the hardware is superior to alot of android phones, and no, it won't make a difference and BlackBerry's market share of the consumer market will continue to fade.

Well John Chen is certainly more concerned about making money of corporate/government software side of the business.  Saying that BB will fade from the consumer market would depend on what market you are taking about, yes they are already dead in the US and fading in the G8 countries.  But we have yet to see what the impact of the Z3 will have on the bottom line especially in the Asiapacific, middle east and africa, were that phone is doing very well so far.  BB has even started up a new run of the Bold 9900 as many people still want that in countries that still have data per mb based plans were the compression of OS7.1/BES 5 saves a lot of money.  In the end BB doesn't need to push Apple or Android out of the top sales tier to be a profitable company, they just need to find their niche and be the best at it.  I'm personally looking forward to see how the public/business greets the square BB Passport, it has impressive specs and a top notch keyboard, but it's not your normal rectangle of glass.  But looks great for editing docs on a phone.

Offline c_canuk

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Re: Tablets
« Reply #80 on: April 15, 2015, 12:42:20 »
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/12/31/blackberry-sony-hack_n_6400640.html

Sony executives switched back to blackberry after being hacked.

"BlackBerrys are back in vogue — at least at Sony Pictures Entertainment. Executives dusted off the once-cutting edge smartphones following a well-publicized cyberattack, according to several reports.

The Wall Street Journal and New York Times report that Sony staff hauled out old BlackBerrys from a basement storage room post-hack, trusting the smartphones because they can send and receive emails through their own servers.

Sony was forced to shut down its computer systems and landlines after hackers infiltrated their network. Staff reverted to using the old BlackBerrys, Gmail accounts and notepads. The payroll department even dug up old machines to issue physical cheques instead of using e-transfer to pay out salaries.


 

A group called the "Guardians of Peace" took credit for the Sony hack over the U.S. Thanksgiving weekend. Hackers stole internal data, exposing employees’ private information and private company memos including humiliating and sometimes racist emails. The hack disrupted the release of Sony's movie “The Interview,” a dark comedy about the assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. The FBI later concluded North Korea was responsible for the attack.

The company’s high-profile switch to BlackBerrys could be good news for the struggling Canadian tech company, which has tried to remain relevant in competitive smartphone market by boasting of its superior data security and business-oriented technology. Its newest phone, the BlackBerry Classic, was released just before Christmas and includes BBM Protected, a secure, encrypted way to message others within a company.

The company has had a busy year, releasing several new phones that return to its roots with a physical keyboard and other distinguishing features and has strengthened its position as an enterprise security company.

PC Magazine speculated that the hack might serve as a wake-up call to companies about the importance of security and that might benefit BlackBerry.

BlackBerry Ltd. shares have been rising since it released the new Classic phone on Dec. 17 and hover around $11 apiece on the NASDAQ.

However its third-quarter results, reported Dec. 19, fell short of analysts’ expectations. Revenue was $793 million for the three months ended Nov. 29. Analysts had predicted $900 million. It reported a net loss of $148 million that shrunk significantly from a loss of $4.4 billion in the year earlier period. "

Seems what us IT Pros have been saying about the switch over to Apple and Android being a stupid thing for Enterprises to do is being proved correct.
"War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."
-John Stewart Mill

Offline GreenWood

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Re: Tablets
« Reply #81 on: April 15, 2015, 16:25:12 »
US Navy : First Navy recruits issued tablets at Great Lakes

Quote
For nearly 140 recruits at Recruit Training Command Great Lakes, Illinois, embarking on their eight-week odyssey to become sailors, April 7 was just another day of gear issue before training starts next week.

But with their seabags, these 137 sailors-in-training were handed tablet computers — a first in the Navy.

The smart device will be their constant companion throughout training at Great Lakes. And though they'll leave them behind when they graduate, this test program is expected to pave the way for the service to add a tablet fleetwide.

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens and Rear Adm. Richard Brown, who heads Naval Service Training Command, helped hand out the tablets to the recruits.

"I really believe that in a few years, we'll look back at today as a watershed moment in the Navy," Stevens said in a phone interview April 7. "This isn't a nice to have item, as many believe. This is absolutely necessary to our Navy and our sailors in making them a more capable 21st century warfighter."

The "eSailor" effort was dreamed up by Stevens nearly two years ago as a way to improve sailors' access to computers and the Internet. This includes all the online sites and data centers the Navy requires sailors to access to manage their careers.

Eliminating the waiting lines to use a computer at sea is just one of the end goals. Taking training to the next level is another. Issuing tablets to sailors is still a ways away, as officials work through security issues and infrastructure changes, but Stevens says wider smart device usage on the job is only a matter of time .

"We simply can't afford not to move in this direction," he said. "There's still a lot of things to work out as we move ahead, but we'll manage those things as we go."

Still to be worked out at recruit training as well as "A" schools is the Wi-Fi access at ships and commands.

Smart devices are all over the Navy these days. Just take a walk around the weather decks of a Navy ship as it pulls in or out of port and you'll see sailors on their phones and tablets.

Other formal efforts to use tablets and Wi-Fi have sprung up around the fleet and even at "A" schools. The joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal School at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, is already stretching the technology in its advanced training and operations.

"All this has many already looking down the line and how we'll integrate these into "A" schools," Stevens said. "That's the next step, but we can't get ahead of ourselves, yet."

The types of tablets

At Great Lakes, the tests are focused on integrating the tablets into the training of recruits.

"We are looking at this as an extension of the classroom," said John Drake, head of NSTC's strategy and analysis division, who's overseeing the tests. "These first tests are really a test of concept and the the tablets being issued were picked based on the requirements we developed for what it needed to do."

A total of 200 small tablets were purchased.

Most recruits are being issued an off-the-shelf Acer Iconia Tab 8, an 8-inch tablet that comes with a protective case.

In addition, 50 MilSpec, 8-inch Getac T800 tablets were purchased.
AM1 Maureen Lydon and AM2 Robert Reynolds, both recruit

AM1 Maureen Lydon and AM2 Robert Reynolds, both recruit division commanders, go over features of the new tablets with Seaman Recruit Joseph Jacobus. (Photo: Scott A. Thornbloom/Navy)

"The current maintenance plan is to issue the Acer tablets first," Drake said. "As they break or are damaged, we'll replace them with the MILSPEC version."

"The goal is to see how the off-the-shelf version performs," Drake said. "We'll be seeing how they survive being dropped, carried and used regularly over the eight weeks."

Though Drake didn't offer up a unit cost, it's clear that the off-the-shelf tablets are the way to go, if they can survive the sailor test. The Iconia Tab 8 retails for about $150, compared to $1,500 for the more rugged Getac device.

Recruits will carry the Acer tablets in the cargo pocket of the trousers of their blue-and-gray Navy working uniform, Drake said. But the MilSpec version is slightly larger because of the built-in protection and may have to be carried in backpacks.

The recruit division commanders will also get tablets, in part to help train with them.

Along with the Windows 8.1 software, all documents and books normally issued to recruits have been loaded on the tablets, including their Trainee Guide — which tells them how to fold clothing and make their beds and other vital boot camp gouge. Also included is an electronic version of the venerable Bluejackets' Manual, which has been a main reference book since 1902.

"The Bluejacket's Manual is the only non-Navy owned content on the tablet," Drake said. "The [U.S.] Naval Institute ... worked with us to provide an electronic version."

In addition, two interactive games have been loaded. One is designed to teach sailors the perils of human trafficking. The other will teach recruits about information and computer security, Drake said.

Initially there will be no access to email or the Internet, Drake said. There are no plans to allow any kind of open Web surfing. But the recruits will be able to start accessing Wi-Fi in their barracks after the midway point of their eight-week training.

"They will have access to Navy.mil web

During the pilot, the tablets will cycle through three of the two-division cycles of recruits over the next six months.

If successful — and both Drake and Stevens believe it will be — the plan is to start early in fiscal year 2016 by expanding the tablets and Wi-Fi to one entire "ship," as barracks at RTC are called.

The 'ship" where the tests are taking place is the USS Grace Hopper, named in honor for one of the Navy's computer pioneers.

"It truly is coincidence that happened," Drake said. "But it wasn't lost on those here that we think she'd be quite pleased by the whole thing."

http://www.navytimes.com/story/military/tech/2015/04/08/first-navy-recruits-issued-tablets-great-lakes/25452877/