Author Topic: VAC wait times  (Read 175415 times)

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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #450 on: March 25, 2020, 20:18:55 »
I bet you can now, right now, add another 8 weeks to the process. Could be more depending how things go.
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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #451 on: April 02, 2020, 14:36:29 »
I am surprised this wasn't published 1 Apr.

Trudeau gives away millions to other countries continuously, but VAC returns funding.


https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/feds-asked-to-automatically-approve-veterans-claims-backlog-amid-covid-19-fears

Feds urged to approve all veterans' claims in backlog amid COVID-19 fears - 2 Apr 20 - Lee Berthiaume CP

OTTAWA — One of Canada’s largest veterans’ organizations is urging the federal government to automatically approve the roughly 44,000 outstanding applications for disability benefits from injured veterans to help them better deal with the COVID-19 crisis. The call from the National Council of Veteran Associations, which represents more than 60 veteran groups, comes amid fears about the financial and emotional toll the pandemic is taking on veterans struggling with mental and physical wounds.

Veterans Affairs Canada says staff are still processing claims as they work from home and that there are no immediate plans to automatically approve the backlog, which was already a source of frustration and anger for many veterans forced to wait years for support even before COVID-19. But the COVID-19 crisis presents yet another barrier for veterans to get their applications approved, said council chairman Brian Forbes, who is also executive director of The War Amps Canada and a member of Veterans Affairs Minister Lawrence MacAulay’s policy advisory group.

“It was bad enough as far as the backlog and the delays and the number of new claims (before COVID-19),” Forbes said in an interview “And then when you put the coronavirus on top of it, you’ve got a perfect storm. Things are just not getting done. One of the issues facing some veterans is that they require a doctor’s assessment of their medical condition before their applications will be processed by Veterans Affairs. Yet many doctors are not seeing patients in person except in extreme circumstances, Forbes said.

Veterans Affairs recently reported more than 18,000 of the 44,000 applications in the backlog were “incomplete.” The federal government has long faced pressure to automatically approve applications for disability benefits for veterans, with Veterans Affairs going back after the fact to conduct audits and verify eligibility. Not only are approval rates for most categories of injuries — including post-traumatic stress disorder — extremely high, advocates warn delays add undue stress on veterans while potentially exacerbating difficult financial and medical conditions.

Yet Forbes suggests it doesn’t make sense for veterans to keep waiting months when the government is promising tens of billions of dollars in support to Canadians and companies to help with COVID-19 — much of which is expected to be disbursed quickly and verified later.

Veterans Affairs says the past week or so has seen more employees (more than 25, 75, 200? How many are working?) whose job is to process the disability claims continuing their work from home to ensure veterans are receiving decisions, especially those with the most urgent needs.

“Although we are not currently using automatic approvals with audits, we are encouraging decision makers to work more efficiently, using available evidence to reach the fastest decision possible,” Veterans Affairs spokesman Josh Bueckert said in an email. The call for automatic approvals comes as some veterans’ organizations are expressing concerns about the impact that the COVID-19 crisis is having on the mental and physical health of Canada’s wounded warriors.

Veterans Affairs says it has been checking up with former military personnel deemed “at risk” ( anyone on this forum been contacted?) while some organizations are using telephones and video conferences to continue providing therapy, counselling and other support. Yet many veterans suffering from physical injuries are now unable to get physio or rehab because of COVID-19 while the pandemic undermines one of the key messages broadcast to vets suffering from PTSD and other mental injuries in recent years: Don’t isolate yourself.

“We have been talking for many years about getting our veterans out,” said Royal Canadian Legion dominion president Tom Irvine, whose branches are helping former service members get groceries, access financial services and stay connected. “It is a concern. There are going to be veterans or members of the Legion that are going to slip through the cracks. Hopefully it’s minimal, but it is a concern. And that is why we’re reaching out on a daily basis.” Irvine also voiced his support for the government to just sign off on the backlogged applications for help.

VETS Canada president Jim Lowther, whose charity provides emergency financial assistance and other services to homeless veterans or those at risk of losing their homes, says the organization has had more calls for help in the past two weeks than usual. A former Canadian Forces member who was previously diagnosed with PTSD, Lowther says many veterans are worried about keeping roofs over their heads while for those suffering from mental injuries, “this is a dangerous time right now and hopefully it won’t last too long.”

Scott Maxwell, executive director of Wounded Warriors Canada, says his non-profit has also received more calls for mental-health assistance, which he took as a hopeful sign veterans suffering from mental injuries aren’t retreating and instead are reaching out for help. And while he says person-to-person contact is the “secret sauce” to his organization’s successful therapy services, he was hopeful its forced shift to online and telephone assistance could eventually see it better supporting veterans in more remote communities.




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Offline Teager

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #452 on: April 02, 2020, 15:07:32 »
Approving all claims is no easy task and backlogs would still exist. A veterans percent would still have to be determined for the injury/illness. This in itself would be a backlog. Then you get another backlog with payments which was already backlogged for all those choosing lump sum.

For new claims it is important for VAC to make sure all relevant information is there because if it's not and they just approve something it could cause issues down the road for other benefits.

Add to the fact VAC employees are working from home and this makes it next to impossible especially for veterans who are not using MY VAC and are still using mail.

Offline Rifleman62

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #453 on: April 02, 2020, 17:22:19 »
I agree, although the backlog is so huge, the wait so long, something has to be done.

Take the risk. How does the gov't ensure our foreign aid is spent as per the agreement? If it's not what does the gov't do?
« Last Edit: April 02, 2020, 18:53:59 by Rifleman62 »
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Offline Harley52

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #454 on: April 06, 2020, 10:18:31 »
Coupled with the backlog of Disability Claims prior to Covid-19 and the current lack of approvals due to Veterans Affairs employees working at home, I envision the wait times for approval of all Disability Claims currently in the system will take 4-5 years at minimum.  The backlog will increase substantially with new Disability claims with no end in sight.  How can we help resolve terrible situation.  We are indeed in dire straits.

Offline Rifleman62

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #455 on: April 07, 2020, 17:36:23 »
Letter from Brian Forbes re Lee Berthiaume's  CP article on 2 Apr 20, above.

Quote
I am attaching a news article entitled “Feds urged to approve all veterans’ claims in backlog amid COVID-19 fears,” published by the Canadian Press this week in a wide number of Canadian newspapers across the country.

During these difficult times, it is my considered opinion that the government must take dramatic steps to address the backlog of veterans’ claims and the significant delays in adjudication. As outlined in the article, we have indeed reached a “perfect storm” with the onset of the COVID-19 crisis.

It is noteworthy that many financial assistance programs currently being rolled out by federal/provincial governments are premised on the philosophy of “pay now and verify later.” In regard to a number of financial initiatives, the earlier need for medical reports to substantiate entitlement to these programs has been waived by the government, given the impracticality of accessing any input from the medical profession in Canada at this troubled time.

I raised this particular initiative at last week’s “Coffee Club” meeting in Ottawa convened by Deputy Minister Walt Natynczyk and Minister Lawrence MacAulay and attended by many leading veteran stakeholder representatives. There was a general consensus that this administrative/adjudicative measure leading to a form of automatic entitlement deserves immediate attention.

In my judgement, the department should adopt the position that veterans’ claims be based on the reasonable evidence provided by the veteran and his or her family with the proviso that individual files could be monitored over time and “spot audits” carried out to address any potential abuses. The clear reality that medical reports usually required by VAC to support these applications are almost impossible to obtain at this time must be recognized in assessing this present dilemma.

It is also noteworthy that it has been the longstanding view of NCVA that this form of automatic entitlement approach should have been implemented by VAC years ago in regard to seriously disabled veterans, with the objective of expediting these specific claims so as to circumvent bureaucratic “red tape” and in recognition of the fact that nearly all of these cases are ultimately granted entitlement in the end, often following many months of adjudicative delay. Now is clearly the time to extend this thinking to all veterans’ claims for all the reasons delineated in the news article.

In light of all the circumstances we are confronting today in Canada, NCVA will continue to pursue this solution with the Minister, the Deputy Minister and senior officials of VAC. In addition, I would recommend that all member-organizations in NCVA get behind this initiative by contacting your local Members of Parliament and any media contacts you may have developed over the years. I will be approaching other veteran stakeholder associations to support our position with the department and senior echelons of the federal government.

In my mind, the old adage that “desperate times call for desperate measures” is particularly apt in this situation.

Hoping everyone is keeping safe and your families are well!
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Offline Harley52

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Disability Claims
« Reply #456 on: April 09, 2020, 09:38:09 »
Are there any Disability Claims being completed lately.  I see no evidence whether they are or not.  Can somebody shed some light on this subject.  Thank you

Offline Firebird

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #457 on: April 09, 2020, 09:49:13 »
Current Wait Times Website indicated that 54 weeks for Disability Claims. This has been updated weekly and has remained at 54 weeks for the last month. I am currently at 72 weeks for Step 3. Not sure why it is taking so long. VAC was a mess before Covid 19 and they will be less of a priority going forward. Veteran voices and needs will be the last group that are addressed after the Pandemic.

Offline Brihard

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #458 on: April 09, 2020, 10:33:38 »
Letter from Brian Forbes re Lee Berthiaume's  CP article on 2 Apr 20, above.

The mechanisms for determining eligibility for a claim are regulatory and policy, not legislative- so if the political desire was there, VAC could expedite claims approval without having to change the law. If there's a time to move forward and aggressively approve the more 'obvious' claims they've been talking about for a few years now, this is it...
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Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #459 on: April 09, 2020, 10:40:29 »
There's a whole bunch of factors that come in to play with VAC claims and the complexity of the claim is obviously going to extend wait times.

I was helping a guy with a claim, he applied in December for tinnitus. He was assessed by a specialist in January and had 20 grand popped into his account end of March (after the world exploded). Lots of the cases I hear about seem pretty straight forward.

From what I've been able to gather, even before the bat apocalypse there was a back long in the system for various reasons.
-Mbrs releasing from the CAF submit a dozen claims at once that all have to be processed.
-Mbrs joining the CAF finish basic training or their trade course and start submitting VAC claims for those savage basic training courses
-Mbrs who want extra money put claims in to vac for injuries they think they should be compensated for.
-Mbrs put in fraudulent claims or very tenuous claims
-Mbrs who doesn't submit the proper paperwork
-Mbrs who submit illegible paperwork and need to be contacted and start over.

A huge issue I'm told from the VAC people are the mbrs who essentially hide out and require extra effort to contact and track down. Good ol "I'm not giving the chain of command my phone number!"


With luck maybe the government will actually order VAC to just approve everyone, but that's a lot of money. It's not all lump sum payouts. I know of a service couple out west making more money from monthly VAC payments than their monthly pay.


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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #460 on: April 09, 2020, 16:57:36 »
From what I've been able to gather, even before the bat apocalypse there was a back long in the system for various reasons.
-Mbrs releasing from the CAF submit a dozen claims at once that all have to be processed.
-Mbrs joining the CAF finish basic training or their trade course and start submitting VAC claims for those savage basic training courses
-Mbrs who want extra money put claims in to vac for injuries they think they should be compensated for.
-Mbrs put in fraudulent claims or very tenuous claims
-Mbrs who doesn't submit the proper paperwork
-Mbrs who submit illegible paperwork and need to be contacted and start over.

So whats the solution? You've basically outlined 99% of the reasons people apply for VAC benefits. We don't have people losing legs in combat anymore, those are the easy ones. The paperwork stuff isn't excusable, if you want your money be accessible and accurate.

A lot of the folks in BMQ and DP1s are putting claims in early because us old folks are telling them to because we were too stupid/proud to do it ourselves and regret it. Its a lot easier to put in a timely claim after an injury and have it reassessed (or at least document that it was service connected) then to file 25 claims on the way out the door. I applied for a reassessment a week before COVID-19 shut things down and have a new assessment pending so I'm kind of testing the timelines in both systems side by side. Obviously anything is going to be delayed but it'll be interesting to see what's completed first.

Offline Tcm621

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #461 on: April 09, 2020, 20:34:47 »
There's a whole bunch of factors that come in to play with VAC claims and the complexity of the claim is obviously going to extend wait times.

I was helping a guy with a claim, he applied in December for tinnitus. He was assessed by a specialist in January and had 20 grand popped into his account end of March (after the world exploded). Lots of the cases I hear about seem pretty straight forward.

From what I've been able to gather, even before the bat apocalypse there was a back long in the system for various reasons.
-Mbrs releasing from the CAF submit a dozen claims at once that all have to be processed.
-Mbrs joining the CAF finish basic training or their trade course and start submitting VAC claims for those savage basic training courses
-Mbrs who want extra money put claims in to vac for injuries they think they should be compensated for.
-Mbrs put in fraudulent claims or very tenuous claims
-Mbrs who doesn't submit the proper paperwork
-Mbrs who submit illegible paperwork and need to be contacted and start over.

A huge issue I'm told from the VAC people are the mbrs who essentially hide out and require extra effort to contact and track down. Good ol "I'm not giving the chain of command my phone number!"


With luck maybe the government will actually order VAC to just approve everyone, but that's a lot of money. It's not all lump sum payouts. I know of a service couple out west making more money from monthly VAC payments than their monthly pay.

So it must be the members fault? I don't file unless I have all the documents, I never just hope it's in my file. I cross every t and dot every i yet it still takes more than a year. The one claim I had that required more information from me was essentially because I couldn't get the Doc and VAC to get on the same page in terms of how they wanted the wording.

If VAC hadn't planned to deal with a certain amount of fraud, they failed in their risk management plan. If they did plan to see a surge in claims after Afghanistan, they failed to accurately assess the situation. As for the huge amount of members who "hide out" I have literally never met anyone who has done anything like that. Most people I know contact VAC proactively asking for updates.

I'm so sick of this "blame the victims" approach. Everything you mention is likely either overblown or the kind of thing they should have anticipated. If it is more than 10‰ of the cases, I'd be very surprised. The plain fact is that there is no legitimate reason for VAC to be more than a year behind. We have heard for literally years how VAC is adding more staff but apparently they can't add enough staff to even halt the back log from getting worse. It's disgraceful and hopefully it will bite them in the *** at some point.

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #462 on: April 09, 2020, 20:40:30 »
So whats the solution?
I'm not sure. My personal dealings with VAC for myself and trying to help others out has been nothing short of awesome and super fast. Other people suffer endless wait times and get so stressed they're ready to jump off a bridge. Very much a bureaucracy.

I might be wrong but I think one of the negative aspects of speeding up service e.g the idea about just accepting/approving common claims *might* result in VAC becoming a sort of Money Mart.

Quote
A lot of the folks in BMQ and DP1s are putting claims in early because us old folks are telling them to because we were too stupid/proud to do it ourselves and regret it.

Quote
Its a lot easier to put in a timely claim after an injury and have it reassessed (or at least document that it was service connected) then to file 25 claims on the way out the door.

No disagreement here. We tell people to be smarter than us and submitting claims in a timely manner and not 25 at the end of a career helps mitigate the backlog. It's a good thing. Same time I'm still a bit biased and when I see someone coming off their trade course and submitting 3, 4 ,5 claims with a pocket full of golden chits I think a certain way. Not my money though.
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Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #463 on: April 09, 2020, 21:01:35 »
So it must be the members fault?
I don't think it's always the members fault. I'm certain VAC screws up too. I should have included that caveat in my other post.

Quote
I don't file unless I have all the documents, I never just hope it's in my file. I cross every t and dot every i yet it still takes more than a year. The one claim I had that required more information from me was essentially because I couldn't get the Doc and VAC to get on the same page in terms of how they wanted the wording.

Great example of the system not working.

Quote
As for the huge amount of members who "hide out" I have literally never met anyone who has done anything like that. Most people I know contact VAC proactively asking for updates.
Fair enough, bad wording on my part. Hide out was my conjecture (though I have seen that) but members change their cell number or contact info and don't contact VAC to update them. From what I understand VAC can't (or isn't supposed to?) call someones unit and leave a message to contact them because of privacy issues.

Quote
I'm so sick of this "blame the victims" approach. Everything you mention is likely either overblown or the kind of thing they should have anticipated.
Quite possible. I don't work at vac and just basing an opinion off my experience with them and in conversations with them.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2020, 08:19:21 by Jarnhamar »
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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #464 on: April 09, 2020, 21:08:03 »
We tell people to be smarter than us and submitting claims in a timely manner and not 25 at the end of a career helps mitigate the backlog. It's a good thing. Same time I'm still a bit biased and when I see someone coming off their trade course and submitting 3, 4 ,5 claims with a pocket full of golden chits I think a certain way. Not my money though.

Yep, agree completely, but those outliers who are probably trying to scam the system are ruining it for the rest of us. There are a ton of legitimate injuries occurring on BMQ and DP1. Part of it has to link to physical fitness. Do we start denying claims because someone who didn't even get Bronze on their PT test strained their back on a ruck march? I'd hate to see one guy who is legitimately injured lose a claim because we're scared of the 1% scamming. We have a huge mental health challenge in the CAF (the suicide issue is not getting better) but yet we're still not properly screening mental health at the Recruiting Center. As my officer term of the day, we really need to do a holistic look at the CAF approach to injury (physical and mental) prevention from the minute someone steps into the Recruiting Center until they get their DWD 25+ years later. If we can get a high percentage solution that gives every opportunity for people to be healthy and stay healthy, then maybe we can stop VAC from being an insurance company with "Deny First, then appeal" as its mission statement.

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #465 on: April 09, 2020, 21:24:32 »
Yep, agree completely, but those outliers who are probably trying to scam the system are ruining it for the rest of us. There are a ton of legitimate injuries occurring on BMQ and DP1. Part of it has to link to physical fitness. Do we start denying claims because someone who didn't even get Bronze on their PT test strained their back on a ruck march? I'd hate to see one guy who is legitimately injured lose a claim because we're scared of the 1% scamming. We have a huge mental health challenge in the CAF (the suicide issue is not getting better) but yet we're still not properly screening mental health at the Recruiting Center. As my officer term of the day, we really need to do a holistic look at the CAF approach to injury (physical and mental) prevention from the minute someone steps into the Recruiting Center until they get their DWD 25+ years later. If we can get a high percentage solution that gives every opportunity for people to be healthy and stay healthy, then maybe we can stop VAC from being an insurance company with "Deny First, then appeal" as its mission statement.
Mental health screening at the recruiting center is only ever going to weed out the honest people. People who want to fly under the radar, will.  It's just like your post deployment mental health check-in; its up to you to self-identify because 30 minutes talking to a random social worker/psychologist running through a checklist doesn't bring anything to the surface that the interviewee doesn't want to disclose.
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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #466 on: April 11, 2020, 00:11:26 »
Yep, agree completely, but those outliers who are probably trying to scam the system are ruining it for the rest of us. There are a ton of legitimate injuries occurring on BMQ and DP1. Part of it has to link to physical fitness. Do we start denying claims because someone who didn't even get Bronze on their PT test strained their back on a ruck march? I'd hate to see one guy who is legitimately injured lose a claim because we're scared of the 1% scamming. We have a huge mental health challenge in the CAF (the suicide issue is not getting better) but yet we're still not properly screening mental health at the Recruiting Center. As my officer term of the day, we really need to do a holistic look at the CAF approach to injury (physical and mental) prevention from the minute someone steps into the Recruiting Center until they get their DWD 25+ years later. If we can get a high percentage solution that gives every opportunity for people to be healthy and stay healthy, then maybe we can stop VAC from being an insurance company with "Deny First, then appeal" as its mission statement.

As soon as we started accepting people wiithout ensuring they were in good shape first, we guaranteed an increase in injuries during the initial courses. It is so obvious I'm wouldn't be surprised if they completely missed or ignored it. The fact is that unlike 50 years ago, the average Canadian is not robust enough to handle the level of physicality required just to pass basic. Even the fit ones often are gym fit but unused to hard labour. We either need to refuse to let them in unless they have a minimum level of fitness or accept that there will be injuries and staff VAC accordingly. The problem is the they are two different ministries with 2 different Ministers, 2 different DMs and all the bureaucracy that goes with it.


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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #467 on: April 11, 2020, 18:00:43 »
Mental health screening at the recruiting center is only ever going to weed out the honest people. People who want to fly under the radar, will.  It's just like your post deployment mental health check-in; its up to you to self-identify because 30 minutes talking to a random social worker/psychologist running through a checklist doesn't bring anything to the surface that the interviewee doesn't want to disclose.

I see what you're trying to say, but that logic implies we shouldn't even bother doing medical screenings because someone could hide a serious medical condition that isn't picked up by the standard MO/PA checklist for a Pt1/Pt2 exam. If we at least put the effort into screening people for mental health/personality disorders we can put hand on heart and say we at least did some screening before throwing them into a huge culture shock and extremely stressful environment.

TCM621: I concur. The biggest travesty to the recruiting process that was done to save time/cost was the removal of the FORCE test for all applicants. Instead of addressing staffing/red tape issues they chopped at the low hanging fruit.

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #468 on: April 11, 2020, 18:07:08 »
Quote from: PuckChaser
If we can get a high percentage solution that gives every opportunity for people to be healthy and stay healthy, then maybe we can stop VAC from being an insurance company

We could ban sports. Seriously.
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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #469 on: April 11, 2020, 18:28:22 »
We could ban sports. Seriously.

Because morale and physical fitness isn't low enough already? Those same people are going to go play in civvie leagues if military leagues aren't around, and speaking specifically to hockey the CAF is FAR more player safety conscious than a downtown beer league.

I know you're anedotally seeing a lot of people hurt in sports, but I'd really say you'd need some hard numbers before going down that road. You only notice more when a "sports guy" is hurt because he's usually the one not on chit every 2nd week and is now a change in the parade state. The dude who's constantly on chit is where I'd like to see us target our time/effort.

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #470 on: April 16, 2020, 21:15:29 »
Anyone else having trouble uploading forms in MyVAC?
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Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #471 on: April 16, 2020, 22:27:59 »
Because morale and physical fitness isn't low enough already? Those same people are going to go play in civvie leagues if military leagues aren't around, and speaking specifically to hockey the CAF is FAR more player safety conscious than a downtown beer league.

I know you're anedotally seeing a lot of people hurt in sports, but I'd really say you'd need some hard numbers before going down that road. You only notice more when a "sports guy" is hurt because he's usually the one not on chit every 2nd week and is now a change in the parade state. The dude who's constantly on chit is where I'd like to see us target our time/effort.

I know this won't be a popular opinion  :nod:

There are a lot of people who's morale drops when they're forced to play sports they don't want to play. Well maybe not drops, but they don't like sports. Some of them at all. I'd rather run 15kms than play half an hour of sports, for example.

There's a team building component to it sure, I think it's less than people give it credit for. There's a lot of injuries.

It's not the "sports guys" getting hurt that I notice (or big picture worry about). It's everyone else who are forced (or if you don't like that word, told to) play sports and get hurt. We have both seen lot of people get hurt playing sports and I'm going to guess there are quite a few medical releases that happened due to sports injuries.

I don't consider playing casual sports beneficial in terms of physical fitness. Floor hockey now and then for 40 minutes (but really maybe half that if you're subbing in unless you don't have big teams). It's more fun and morale for people who enjoy it.

I'd be curious to see the number of release's we've had stemming from sports injuries. Maybe I'm off line and it's low.
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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #472 on: April 17, 2020, 01:02:53 »
I know this won't be a popular opinion  :nod:

There are a lot of people who's morale drops when they're forced to play sports they don't want to play. Well maybe not drops, but they don't like sports. Some of them at all. I'd rather run 15kms than play half an hour of sports, for example.

There's a team building component to it sure, I think it's less than people give it credit for. There's a lot of injuries.

It's not the "sports guys" getting hurt that I notice (or big picture worry about). It's everyone else who are forced (or if you don't like that word, told to) play sports and get hurt. We have both seen lot of people get hurt playing sports and I'm going to guess there are quite a few medical releases that happened due to sports injuries.

I don't consider playing casual sports beneficial in terms of physical fitness. Floor hockey now and then for 40 minutes (but really maybe half that if you're subbing in unless you don't have big teams). It's more fun and morale for people who enjoy it.

I'd be curious to see the number of release's we've had stemming from sports injuries. Maybe I'm off line and it's low.

I agree. We had more, and more serious injuries incurred by troops playing soccer waiting to jump into an airborne exercise than were ever injured in the jump itself. Some numbers from the US Army:


Sports and physical training injury hospitalizations in the army.

INTRODUCTION:

Injuries are the leading health problem in the military services. Sports and physical training activities are an area in which a substantial number of injuries can occur. Although athletic injuries are not often investigated in military populations, the Armed Forces database provides a unique opportunity to investigate sports injuries.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10736548
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Offline meday875

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #473 on: April 22, 2020, 10:36:28 »
I put in for reassessment last year, in October. It’s was more than three months before I received the package to even have a medical professional fill it out. Every time I asked about it, I was told that putting together a reassessment package was complicated due to having to have specific member medical information, then got standard forms for the actual application. So take the “Average” wait time, and add at least three months, and this was before the pandemic.

I have another application in, that was filled out improperly by a physician when I first released (as I didn’t have a family doctor I had to go to anyone willing to fill it out) and then when I finally had a good family doctor, was told to reapply but as a new application, not an appeal, and I asked specifically. So I did. And about a year later I get a call, they’re going to approve it, yay, then somewhere in the conversation she reads my file (I guess this hadn’t already been part of the year long processing of the application) and realizes that it should have been an appeal. FML. So, I filed for an appeal. Six months later I final hear from the appeals people, they tell me departmental review, should be simple especially since it would have been an easy approval if it had been done right the first go around. Average wait times on departmental review were just decreased to 42 weeks, I’m at 43... for the departmental review of an application I initially submitted in 2015. And this is a simple application, no complexities and was basically approved at one point. Five years for an injury that was documented while I served.

So although they are updating the wait times and saying that there are no extra issues with them working from home, I simply don’t believe it. But if someone has had an application finished recently, please tell me. It’d be comforting to know that they actually are being done.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2020, 10:51:02 by meday875 »

Offline Firebird

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Re: VAC wait times
« Reply #474 on: April 22, 2020, 11:06:49 »
I am in the same boat. Submitted my reassessment in 2016. Was told to resubmit as a new application and so I did. Application was later Suspended by VAC for lack of info from doctor. I had to resubmit and I am now at 74 weeks since it reached Step 3. Wait times say it is an average of 56 weeks.