Author Topic: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"  (Read 38918 times)

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Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #125 on: May 08, 2018, 10:47:23 »
Colin P: 

Same applies to our shipbuilding in spades  ;).

Mark
Ottawa

I think our program is farther along in the reality curve, however they have advantages of many yards already capable to build, where we worked hard to dismantle almost every yard that could build ships and now need to rebuild that capability.

Offline Uzlu

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #126 on: June 05, 2018, 07:33:48 »
Quote
Canada now seeks only three converted icebreakers

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) is in negotiations with Federal Fleet Services and Chantier Davie for the conversion of three modern icebreakers for the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), PSPC confirmed to Jane’s on 1 June.

PSPC had initially sought four of the ships.

Federal Fleet has been in negotiations with the Canadian government since January, after proposing its Project Resolute as a solution to replace the CCG’s icebreakers, which have been in service on average for 35 years or more. These icebreakers are plagued by breakdowns, reducing the number of days they are operational and causing numerous ice-related difficulties on the St Lawrence River during the winter.
http://www.janes.com/article/80612/canada-now-seeks-only-three-converted-icebreakers

Offline Uzlu

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #127 on: June 06, 2018, 07:35:30 »
Quote
Feds close to deal with Davie for icebreakers

OTTAWA — The federal government is close to a deal with Davie Shipbuilding that would see the Quebec shipyard provide several used icebreakers to bolster the Canadian Coast Guard's own aging fleet.

While final details are still being worked out, sources have told The Canadian Press that an agreement is imminent after months of intense — and at times contentious — closed-door negotiations.

The pending deal represents a win for Davie and the Quebec government, both of which have been demanding more federal work for the shipbuilder after it laid off 800 workers at its shipyard in Levis late last year.

It is not, however, exactly what Davie originally proposed: the company wanted to convert three medium icebreakers and one heavy vessel and lease them to the coast guard, whose own fleet is nearing the end of its useful life.

The company will still do conversion work on the three medium icebreakers, sources say, but the coast guard will take full ownership of the vessels instead of leasing them.

The two sides also remain far apart on the heavy icebreaker, which Davie has been pushing hard despite strong reticence from senior coast guard officials who say it does not meet their needs.

The federal shipbuilding strategy does already include plans for one heavy icebreaker, the Canadian Coast Guard ship John G. Diefenbaker, which could explain the coast guard's hesitation, said University of Calgary professor Rob Huebert.

"A lot of effort went into the design of the Diefenbaker," said Huebert, who has worked extensively with the coast guard. "If I was the coast guard, I would be terrified that if I got the Davie ship, I would not get the Diefenbaker."

Diefenbaker, however, isn't due to be delivered until the mid-2020s, at the earliest.

Word of the pending deal comes in the face of even more bad news for the coast guard's existing icebreakers, which are on average more than 35 years old and have lost hundreds of operational days in recent years due to mechanical breakdowns.

The most recent headache came in late April, when CCGS Terry Fox ran aground near Bide Arm, N.L.

The vessel sailed back to St. John's under its own power, an official said, where repairs were conducted on two holes in its hull, but it was later determined that more work would be required to get it back into service.

That leaves the 49-year-old CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent as the coast guard's only heavy icebreaker until the Terry Fox is up and operational again, though coast guard commissioner Jeffery Hutchinson said the service could cover for it.

"It will be back in service as part of our Arctic program this summer," Hutchinson told a parliamentary committee on Tuesday, "and we're able to cover all Arctic requirements in our program by reallocating resources internally."

But coast guard officials have conceded for years that they need additional icebreakers to supplement their fleet, and suggested they could turn to novel solutions such as leasing vessels or hiring private companies to help them.

"We're stuck in this kind of limbo with the coast guard where their vessels keep getting longer in the tooth and what they need to do just keeps going up and up and up," said Huebert.

"There is a dire need for them getting some modernized icebreakers. No question about it."

The negotiations between the federal government and Davie have nonetheless been steeped in politics.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau surprised many, including the Canadian Coast Guard and Davie itself, when he announced the launch of talks while visiting Quebec City in January.

The announcement followed concerns about the current icebreaker fleet, but also an intense lobbying campaign by Davie as well as the Quebec government and federal opposition parties on the shipyard's behalf.

It also coincided with an RCMP investigation into allegations Vice-Admiral Mark Norman leaked cabinet secrets to Davie to keep the Liberals from cancelling a $700-million contract to provide the navy with an interim support ship.

Norman was suspended as the military's second-in-command last year and charged with breach of trust this past March. He has denied any wrongdoing and vowed to fight the charge in court.

Most of the work on the interim support ship was finished late last year, at which point Davie laid off 800 workers; the shipyard says it did not have enough work for them, but that it is hoping to hire some back for the icebreakers.

Davie initially proposed leasing icebreakers to the coast guard in April 2016, after acquiring the rights to four vessels that were destined for use in Alaska's offshore oil and gas industry until a downturn in the market.
https://www.insidehalton.com/news-story/8652564-feds-close-to-deal-with-davie-for-icebreakers/

Offline Chief Stoker

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #129 on: June 22, 2018, 17:14:22 »
About time, note purchase (real cheap) not lease--a lot of Quebec provincial and federal politics pushing this now:

Quote
Ottawa makes deal to buy three icebreakers for coast guard
Deal avoids major work slowdown, layoffs at the Davie shipyard ahead of Quebec provincial election

The Liberal government has concluded a deal with a Quebec shipyard to purchase, through a sole-source contract, three medium icebreakers to relieve pressure on the Canadian Coast Guard's aging fleet.

The agreement struck with Chantier Davie of Levis, Que., which operates the Davie shipyard, was announced Friday [June 22] in a release by Public Services and Procurement Canada.

No dollar figure was included in the statement, but sources close to the negotiations said that between the purchase and modification phase, the agreement could be worth just under $500 million [emphasis added].

Negotiations to acquire the vessels were launched in January after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau abruptly announced the plan in a Radio-Canada interview.

There has been growing concern in Quebec about not only the shipyard and its workforce of roughly 1,300, but about the coast guard's ability to break ice in the St. Lawrence River.

Competing shipyards will have two weeks to challenge the sole-source contract and demonstrate they can deliver ships with similar — or better — capabilities.

    Analysis
    Why the Liberals really don't want to talk about leasing icebreakers

    Aging icebreaker fleet raises concern in Quebec

When talks started with Davie, the federal government was looking to lease or buy four ships which would be converted from existing vessels. Those vessels had been intended for use in Alaska's offshore oil and gas industry until there was a downturn in the market.

The deal that was struck involves a straight-up purchase of three icebreakers, with the Davie yard set to complete a series of modifications, said the sources.
Contract bound to raise questions

It's a significant deal on political, legal and corporate levels.

The agreement avoids a major work slowdown at the yard — and the resulting layoffs — ahead of a provincial election which will see the Liberal government of Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard fighting for its life.

The contract also is bound to raise questions about the National Shipbuilding Strategy, which was introduced by the former Conservative government and championed by the Liberals since they came to power in 2015.

The Davie shipyard was in bankruptcy when the strategy was announced — so it was excluded from the NSS, which has seen Ottawa form a special relationship with Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax and Seaspan of Vancouver. Irving and Seaspan are the go-to companies for federal ship construction.

    Federal government looks to lease icebreakers from Quebec shipyard Davie

    Quebec ports could lose business if aging icebreakers not replaced, documents warn

The coast guard's new heavy icebreaker is supposed to be built by Seaspan, but the project is still years away from construction [emphasis added]...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/coast-guard-icebreakers-davie-1.4718592

Mark
Ottawa
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #130 on: June 22, 2018, 17:39:59 »
Gov't news release:

Quote
Canada to Acquire Three Interim [when buying them, not leasing?] Icebreakers
...
The Government of Canada is committed to providing the women and men of the Canadian Coast Guard with the equipment they need to keep Canadian waters safe, while supporting economic growth.

On behalf of the Canadian Coast Guard, Public Services and Procurement Canada has issued an Advanced Contract Award Notice (ACAN) to Chantier Davie of Lévis, Quebec, for the acquisition and conversion of three medium commercial icebreakers.  This ensures a fair, competitive process allowing any supplier with a comparable option to also submit a proposal before a contract is awarded.

The ACAN confirms Canada’s intention to enter into a contract with Chantier Davie. Other interested suppliers have 15 calendar days to signal their interest in bidding for this contract, by submitting a “statement of capabilities” that meets the requirements laid out in the ACAN.

These ships would provide interim capability for the Canadian Coast Guard, while replacement vessels  are being built under the National Shipbuilding Strategy [emphasis added--plural? only one planned, years away from delivery by Seaspan]. Icebreakers are essential to ensuring that Canadian ports remain open during Canada’s ice seasons, ensuring goods such as fresh produce and fuel are delivered safely...

Quick facts

    This acquisition will consist of purchasing a class of three existing Anchor Handling Tug Supply icebreakers [emphasis added, definition would be nice].

    These ships will be used to backfill for Canadian Coast Guard vessels while they are undergoing maintenance, refit and vessel life extension.

    These ships will conduct critical icebreaking duties for the Southern wintertime program and are to be deployed as needed in support of Arctic summertime programs.

    The first ship will be put to immediate use for icebreaking during the upcoming 2018-2019 season...
https://www.canada.ca/en/public-services-procurement/news/2018/06/canada-to-acquire-three-interim-icebreakers.html

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Swampbuggy

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #131 on: June 22, 2018, 18:53:06 »
What’s the issue with AIVIQ? It hasn’t been mentioned in any way since the PM announced his surprise.

Offline Uzlu

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #132 on: June 23, 2018, 14:53:29 »
What’s the issue with AIVIQ? It hasn’t been mentioned in any way since the PM announced his surprise.
There might not be anything wrong with the icebreaker.
Quote
The two sides also remain far apart on the heavy icebreaker, which Davie has been pushing hard despite strong reticence from senior coast guard officials who say it does not meet their needs.

The federal shipbuilding strategy does include plans for one heavy icebreaker, the Canadian Coast Guard ship John G. Diefenbaker, which could explain the coast guard's hesitation, said University of Calgary professor Rob Huebert.

"A lot of effort went into the design of the Diefenbaker," said Huebert, who has worked extensively with the coast guard. "If I was the coast guard, I would be terrified that if I got the Davie ship, I would not get the Diefenbaker."
https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/feds-close-to-deal-with-quebec-shipyard-davie-for-coast-guard-icebreakers-1.3960465

Offline Swampbuggy

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #133 on: June 23, 2018, 15:22:59 »
There might not be anything wrong with the icebreaker.https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/feds-close-to-deal-with-quebec-shipyard-davie-for-coast-guard-icebreakers-1.3960465

I was under the impression that AIVIQ is more in line with TERRY FOX or LOUIS ST LAURENT and as such, doesn’t have the same capability as DIEFENBAKER. It should be complimentary to the heavy ice breaker, not a replacement for it. I guess I understand their fears, but it’s not like we couldn’t use more than one or two top tier icebreakers.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #134 on: June 23, 2018, 16:53:26 »
1) More on Davie's Aiviq here:
http://www.davie.ca/pdf/Aiviq.pdf

From a tweet:

Quote
https://twitter.com/chantierdavie/status/918565826650890240

2) Will Finland's Arctia contest the sole-source to Davie within the 15-day ACAN window? CETA with EU implications? From January this year:

Quote
Arctia Ltd. ready to support Canada\

The Finnish shipowner Arctia Ltd. is moving forward to support Canada in icebreaking and towing services. The company has responded to the Canadian Government’s Request for Information and Industry Consultation for Interim Icebreaking and Towing Capability for the Canadian Coast Guard, and continues to follow the tendering process. Arctia’s purpose-built icebreaker fleet is promptly available, and can serve the Canadian industry and Arctic communities within weeks.



“We were quite surprised yesterday reading the news stating that negotiations will be launched with one interested supplier for the conversion and lease of existing supply vessels. We have understood that the open tender for interim icebreaking services is still open and does not cover any conversion costs“, states Tero Vauraste, the President and CEO of Arctia Ltd.

Arctia Ltd. participates in the Canadian Government’s tender for interim icebreaking solutions. The company is ready to charter its icebreakers to the Canadian Coast Guard and explore cooperative solutions to help Canada avoid the so-called icebreaker gap within the formal purchasing process. The Government’s public tender issued in November 2016 states that the Canadian Coast Guard may require additional icebreaking capacity provided by one (1) to five (5) icebreakers at various times over the next number of years.

    “We have extensive experience in the North American Arctic. All our icebreakers have diesel-electric propulsion and they are designed specifically for challenging and long-lasting icebreaking operations. They need no conversion for operations in the Canadian Arctic. This is a clear advantage compared to our competitors. We are the only operator in the world that can provide multiple powerful heavy and medium heavy polar class icebreakers promptly and on a commercial basis“, Vauraste explains.

Arctia Ltd. is a Finnish shipowner specialized in icebreaking, ice management and towing. The company currently has eight icebreakers in its fleet, including IB Polaris, the first Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) powered icebreaker in the world. Finnish multipurpose icebreakers have been proven effective in the Canadian Arctic. Just this July, the Finnish MSV Nordica transited the Northwest Passage (NWP) from Vancouver, Canada, to Nuuk, Greenland, in 24 days with researchers and a Canadian Coast Guard officer on board. This transit set the record for the earliest crossing of the NWP. The Nordica now holds the records for both the earliest and latest season transits of the NWP.

Along with the Nordica, its sister vessel MSV Fennica has served in ice management tasks in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas in 2007 and from 2012 to 2015. Arctia’s converted IB Otso has worked on the north-eastern coast of Greenland...
https://www.vesselfinder.com/news/11295-Arctia-Ltd-ready-to-support-Canada

Mark
Ottawa

Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Uzlu

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #135 on: July 09, 2018, 20:17:39 »
Quote
Politics at play in major shipbuilding contract that could land in Quebec

The federal government is looking to a Quebec company for a major shipbuilding contract, but a competitor is questioning the backroom politics behind who gets the job.

The contract is to convert three used ships from Norway and the United States into icebreakers. Levis’ Davie Shipyards is vying for the contract.

“The only company in the world that can fit all these criteria is Davie,” said the company’s VP of Public Affairs Frederik Boisvert.

However, competing company Fednav, Canada’s largest ocean-going cargo shipper, said it wants to build several brand new icebreakers in Norway, where they said shipbuilding is more efficient.

“It’s about having built an assembly line effectively and perfecting something,” said Fednav CEO Paul Pathy.

Canada’s current fleet of icebreakers is aging and Pathy questioned the federal government’s practice of stretching the ships’ lifespan.

“Right now, there are no heavy icebreakers available because they’re all on layup because they’re so old,” he said. “They keep being renewed and renewed and renewed.”

The oft-ice clogged St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes – St-Lawrence Seaway is the source of $35 billion a year in revenue and 225,000 jobs in Canada and the U.S., making the presence of icebreakers essential for the Canadian economy.

University of British Columbia professor Michael Byers said the government can’t ignore the benefits of building ships in Canada.

“The shipworkers here in Canada pay taxes, they buy homes, they buy cars, they buy groceries,” he said.

But Aaron Wudrick of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation said Ottawa must make decisions based on the best deal.

“We need to get the best icebreaker for the lowest price and not worry about where it’s being built,” he said.

The federal procurement ministry did not respond to requests for comment by deadline. A decision on the contract is expected on July 11.
https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/politics-at-play-in-major-shipbuilding-contract-that-could-land-in-quebec-1.4005945

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #136 on: July 14, 2018, 14:26:33 »
Sure could use those Davie-converted icebreakers, at very least--this old one (built 1985) off to help resupply USAF base at Thule, Greenland, amongst other things:

Quote
Canadian Coast Guard Ship Samuel Risley departs for its first-ever Arctic mission



The Canadian Coast Guard’s annual Arctic operational season is underway and includes a maiden voyage to the Arctic by the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Samuel Risley.

CCGS Samuel Risley departed Quebec City today with 25 officers and crew on board.

Their first task will be to support the annual resupply mission for the United States Air Base at Thule Greenland.   “My crew and I will be doing the Operation Pacer Goose mission [emphasis added].  We are very much looking forward to seeing and working on the rugged west coast of Greenland, a place few people ever get to experience,” said Captain John Cork, who is in command of CCGS Samuel Risley for the first month of its eight week Arctic mission.  “This is a wonderful opportunity for the crew, and personally I am thrilled to have this as my last assignment before I retire after 34 years with the Canadian Coast Guard”.

1200 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, Thule is locked in by ice about nine months out of the year.  Icebreaking service is needed to allow for a rapid resupply of food, fuel, construction materials and cargo.  After Thule CCGS Samuel Risley will transit to the eastern Canadian Arctic and the waters of Baffin Bay, the Hudson Strait and northern Hudson Bay.

Captain Signe Gotfredsen notes her crew members are truly looking forward to providing Coast Guard service in the north.  Captain Gotfredsen will assume command of the ship during the second half of this mission. “For a number of the crew, this will be their first time plying Arctic waters, so there is a sense of exploration onboard,”  said Captain Gotfredsen.  “Some of our preparation time has been spent on training including Indigenous Engagement, helicopter slinging operations and environmental response.”

CCGS Samuel Risley joined the Coast Guard fleet in the fall of 1985 [2000 t. https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/details/ships/shipid:380038/mmsi:316001890/imo:8322442/vessel:SAMUEL_RISLEY ]. During most of the navigational season the ship operates out of the Canadian Coast Guard base in Parry Sound Ontario. The vessel is multi-tasked and in addition to its icebreaking and aids to navigation duties on the Great Lakes it has also served on Canada’s east coast [emphasis added].

The Canadian Coast Guard’s Arctic operational season will run into late November, providing extended vessel presence in the Arctic under investments from the $1.5-billion Oceans Protection Plan.

CCGS Samuel Risley joins other coast guard ships serving the Arctic this year including CCGS Amundsen, CCGS Martha L. Black, CCGS Pierre Radisson, CCGS Sir Wilfrid Laurier, CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent and CCGS Henry Larsen.
http://www.manitoulin.ca/2018/07/12/canadian-coast-guard-ship-samuel-risley-departs-for-its-first-ever-arctic-mission/

Mark
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Offline Colin P

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #137 on: July 16, 2018, 00:18:26 »
All of those ships were in service when I joined in 1990 and will still be active when I retire 2019........

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #138 on: August 02, 2018, 13:00:02 »
CCG can only look on in envy--but this is only authorization, Congress still has to appropriate funds:

Quote
National Defense [Authorization] Act has heavy Arctic focus

...The U.S. Coast Guard has only two [icebreakers]--and one of them is 10 years beyond its intended use.

The bill passed Wednesday authorizes six new icebreakers.

“For the first time ever, the NDAA includes an authorization of up to six heavy, polar-class icebreakers for the U.S. Coast Guard – something that is long overdue,” said Senator Dan Sullivan (R - Alaska)...

Authorization of Six Heavy Polar-Class Icebreakers: The FY19 NDAA includes a provision secured by Senator Sullivan to authorize up to six heavy, polar-class icebreakers for the U.S. Coast Guard. In addition, this provision expresses Congress’ belief that the first new icebreaker should be delivered no later than Fiscal Year 2023, the next two by FY 2026, and the final three by FY 2029...
http://www.ktva.com/story/38793068/national-defense-act-has-heavy-arctic-focus

Useful cautionary tweet:

Quote
Rob Levinson
‏@levinsor

A plea. Please stop referring to the NDAA as a spending bill. I realize that the difference between authorization and appropriation is pretty wonky but it does matter. The NDAA matters for policy but many things that get authorized don't necessarily get funded.
https://twitter.com/levinsor/status/1025004264425435136

Mark
Ottawa
« Last Edit: August 02, 2018, 13:16:21 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #139 on: August 02, 2018, 20:17:49 »
The Aiviq has been discussed elsewhere in the thread, but it doesn't look like the other three "new" icebreakers have been mentioned.

Vidar viking

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vidar_Viking

Tor viking

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tor_Viking

Baldor viking

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balder_Viking

The Norwegians build a good ship, and Viking is a reputable operator, so they should be good boats, but I hope they're getting a good price, as all three are pushing 20 years old!
« Last Edit: August 03, 2018, 06:00:05 by Not a Sig Op »
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #140 on: August 02, 2018, 20:48:39 »
Well, it's Canada--why buy new (built here at stupid price when one could buy abroad) rather than refurbish? Cf. RAAF Hornets, eh?

Too silly. And all politics all the time and the public/voters/media do not care.

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Xylric

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #141 on: August 09, 2018, 03:15:00 »
My grandfather's grandfather was originally employed at a Royal Navy shipyard somewhere in Scotland, and moved to Nova Scotia once those shut down. The yards he was a shipwright for after he arrived in Canada were at one time the largest in Canada. He would be most put out to know they're pretty much sitting idle these days - even my grandfather was, but that's probably because he was *from* the town surrounding them.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #142 on: August 10, 2018, 13:18:14 »
Official release--finally contract with Davie for three icebreaking ship conversions--if vessels are capable and have serious life in service then sure looks a lot cheaper and more effective than doing all the building here:

Quote
Government of Canada awards contract to enhance Canadian Coast Guard icebreaking capability, securing middle class jobs in Quebec
...
August 10, 2018 – Lévis (Quebec) – Public Services and Procurement Canada

The Government of Canada is committed to providing the Canadian Coast Guard with the equipment it needs to carry out its important work, while providing economic opportunities for the Canadian marine sector. The purchase of three medium commercial icebreakers will help to ensure continuity of service for Coast Guard clients and the safe passage of marine traffic through Canada’s waterways.

Following a fair, open and transparent process that included extensive industry engagement, Public Services and Procurement Canada, on behalf of the Canadian Coast Guard, has awarded a $610-million contract to Chantier Davie, of Lévis, Quebec for the acquisition of three icebreakers and work to prepare the first ship for service in the Canadian Coast Guard.

Further costs will be known once the Government of Canada has examined the vessels and determined what work is required to prepare them for service.

This contract will help to secure up to 200 well-paying middle class jobs at Chantier Davie.

The first vessel is expected to begin operations for the upcoming icebreaking season, beginning in December 2018. The second and third vessels will be converted, refit and available to support Coast Guard programs by the summer of 2019 and the winter of 2019-2020, respectively.

This contract follows an Advance Contract Award Notice that was issued on June 22, 2018...

[Tee hee] These ships will supplement the Coast Guard’s existing fleet while they undergo refits and repairs. They will conduct critical missions such as icebreaking duties for the Southern wintertime program and will be deployed as needed in support of Arctic summertime programs...
https://www.canada.ca/en/public-services-procurement/news/2018/08/government-of-canada-awards-contract-to-enhance-canadian-coast-guard-icebreaking-capability-securing-middle-class-jobs-in-quebec.html

Mark
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Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline tomahawk6

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #143 on: August 10, 2018, 16:15:36 »
Saw this vessel online and thought it might be a nice addition and it has a helo deck..

http://www.workboatsinternational.com/ice-classed-antarctic-supply-vessel-for-sale-asv3647.html 

Built:
1986 / UK Ferguson

Class:
BV Ice Class A1 Super / Special Service
LOA:
65.5
LBP:
58.33
Beam:
12.80
Depth:
5.35
Draft:
4.78
Main Engines:
2 x Miirlees Blackstone 8MB275 Marine Diesel Engines
Power:
2 x 2,300 kW
Auxiliary Engines:
3 x 300 kW Caterpillar 3408
Propulsion:
2 x Variable Pitch Propellers
Thruster:
1 x 500 BHP Bow Thruster
Maximum Speed:
14.2 knots
Crane:
swl 32 t

Rear A Frame:
20 Ton
Passenger capacity:
50 persons in 13 cabins
Crew:
5 Officers / 12 Total
Aviation Facilities:
Helideck for Lama or Ecureuil type Helicopters

DECK SPACE
Cargo Deck:
320 m2
Helideck:
162 m2 | Access to
Cargo Deck:
10.5 m x 3.7 m | Over Cargo
Deck:
160 m2
Price: Best Offers ( Can Guide Named Buyers)
Location: South Pacific

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #144 on: August 10, 2018, 18:12:25 »
Official release--finally contract with Davie for three icebreaking ship conversions--if vessels are capable and have serious life in service then sure looks a lot cheaper and more effective than doing all the building here:

Mark
Ottawa

It's a good start, but they already have half their lives well lived. However, since about six River icebreakers need replacements, they can stop the gap before three new ones can be bought and come in service (about 12 to 15 years if you start the design and contracting process now) to replace the three oldest ones on hand and then continue up to six to replace those stop gap ones over the following six to eight years. This way, you would replace the River fleet in eighteen to twenty years with no icebreaker getting over the age of forty and most being replaced at around age 35. That would be an incredible achievement for the Canadian government.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #145 on: August 10, 2018, 19:27:30 »
Some (all?) for Davie? What the Conservative gov't allocated to Seaspan in 2013, to be built some never never land day (later was decided the one polar icebreaker would follow the two JSS--that icebreaking vessel now supposedly mid-2020s):

Quote
Canadian Coast Guard Shocker – Ten (maybe) New Serious Vessels
...
"VANCOUVER, British Columbia, October 7, 2013 – The Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Public Works and Government Services, joined by the Honourable James Moore, Minister of Industry and Regional Minister for British Columbia, today announced that Vancouver Shipyards will be building up to 10 additional large non-combat ships [backgrounder at link] for the Canadian Coast Guard fleet at an estimated cost of $3.3 billion [that's $330 million each, people)...

This significant investment will enable the Coast Guard to acquire up to five Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels and up to five Offshore Patrol Vessels…"

...Let’s just hope things proceed fairly smoothly from now on [SEEN NO MOVEMENT SINCE].
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/mark-collins-canadian-coast-guard-shocker-ten-maybe-new-serious-vessels/

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #146 on: August 10, 2018, 21:43:25 »
Saw this vessel online and thought it might be a nice addition and it has a helo deck..

Built:
1986 / UK Ferguson

It's 32 years old.

30 years is pretty much the end of reliable service life for any ocean going vessel.
Remember troops, the minimum acceptable standard is still an acceptable standard.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #147 on: August 12, 2018, 19:47:46 »
Anglophone Canadian media pretty much ignore CCG procurements compared to those of CAF--even the, gasp, sole-source contract to Davie for three icebreaker conversions.  So far both

1) CBC
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/ottawa-will-allow-quebec-s-davie-shipyard-to-bid-on-national-shipbuilding-plan-contracts-1.4780836

and

2) CTV
https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/610-million-contract-awarded-to-convert-icebreakers-at-davie-shipyard-1.4048440

treat the acquisition as simply a Quebec story, not a national one.  And have seen nothing in print media.

Lack of serious media interest sure allows CCG procurements, including effective sole-sourcing of two new helicopter buys (more here https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2015/04/11/mark-collins-canadian-coast-guards-new-medium-lift-helos-sole-sourced-to-bell-canada/ ), to escape the sort of controversy that almost inevitably follows those of CAF. 

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #148 on: August 14, 2018, 11:27:40 »
Sale of the three icebreaking ships to Davie confirmed--note price in US$, so far gov't has said it will be paying Davie C$610 million:

Quote
Viking Supply [Norwegian-owned] confirms sale of icebreaking AHTS trio to Canada

Confirming the identities of the three vessels that Chantier Davie, Lévis, Quebec, is to convert to icebreakers for the Canadian Coast Guard (see earlier story) Viking Supply Ships AS, a wholly owned subsidiary of Sweden's Viking Supply Ships AB (VSS) said today that it has sold its three icebreakers, Tor Viking, Balder Viking and Vidar Viking to Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

In its fleet listings, Viking Supply Ships describes each of the ships as "Combined AHTS & Ice-breaker with DNV Ice-10 notation. Capable of operations in harsh environment offshore regions and Arctic/Sub-Arctic regions."

Impact on net result of the sale is estimated at $274 million [emphasis added] and will be booked in Q3. The transaction is expected to close by the end of August...

"The offshore supply market was very disappointing throughout the first half year, and the very weak market has caused both fixture rates and utilization to remain on unsatisfactory levels," says the company...


https://www.marinelog.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=30090:viking-supply-confirms-sale-of-icebreaking-ahts-trio-to-canada&Itemid=257

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline garb811

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Re: "Canadian Coast Guard Going Down"
« Reply #149 on: August 14, 2018, 12:02:34 »
Colour me confused but...

When I read this in the original release:
Quote
Following a fair, open and transparent process that included extensive industry engagement, Public Services and Procurement Canada, on behalf of the Canadian Coast Guard, has awarded a $610-million contract to Chantier Davie, of Lévis, Quebec for the acquisition of three icebreakers and work to prepare the first ship for service in the Canadian Coast Guard.
I interpreted the $610mil to be inclusive of the cost of the ships proper via Davie.

Yet the article just posted by Mark states the vessels had been sold to "Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada."

So, I take it this means the $610mil to Davies is for overhaul/fit up etc only and the Govt has bought the ships direct, making the actual cost in the vicinity of $1 billion, once currency conversion is factored in?