Author Topic: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay  (Read 105062 times)

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Offline jmt18325

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #125 on: June 27, 2016, 03:22:24 »
Yeah, common people, like Trump.

Anyway, I haven't turned down any pay raises lately.

jollyjacktar

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #126 on: June 27, 2016, 03:28:15 »
Common people do like Trump, I agree.  Pay raises, haven't seen one of those for some time.

Offline jmt18325

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #127 on: June 27, 2016, 04:19:18 »
Common people do like Trump, I agree. 

I know that you know that I didn't mean that at all.

Won't they be ever so disappointed in him if he wins though.  There's nothing common about him.

jollyjacktar

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #128 on: June 27, 2016, 04:55:24 »
I know that you know that I didn't mean that at all.

Won't they be ever so disappointed in him if he wins though.  There's nothing common about him.

I think they'll be disappointed with either option on the table.  Most options leave you wanting.  We are no different here.

Offline Lightguns

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #129 on: June 27, 2016, 07:10:35 »
;)

Although I'd wager there's more than one ABC Veteran who's suffering buyer's regret seeing as they were gulled by false promise.

Not according to their twitter account, they re-tweet liberal propaganda like a partisan party member (which they likely are).  But speaking of regret, County Cornwall, poorest county in UK, is now changing their minds as most of their welfare benefits comes from the EU.
Done, 34 years, 43 days complete, got's me damn pension!

jollyjacktar

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #130 on: June 27, 2016, 10:51:24 »
With the Labour party tearing itself to pieces, I'm sure there's more than on on the dole who's nervous now.

Offline Remius

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #131 on: June 27, 2016, 11:48:01 »
Interesting article from CNN on the Brexit broken promises that are already taking shape.

http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/27/news/economy/brexit-broken-promises/index.html

I think I agree with the first two.  Clearly the leaver side made some promises it can't or won't keep.  The third one though is too early to tell. But if the economy continues to tank, it might be a good thing for any country that might have issues with separatists and what not.  It may be something to discourage them from leaving their own unions.
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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #132 on: June 27, 2016, 12:25:41 »
Surely the point is that the UK now has the authority to reallocate those funds as it sees fit.... and that could include a new hospital, or any other application foreign or domestic.  But that money will be controlled by Westminster and not Brussels.
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Offline Remius

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #133 on: June 27, 2016, 12:37:50 »
Surely the point is that the UK now has the authority to reallocate those funds as it sees fit.... and that could include a new hospital, or any other application foreign or domestic.  But that money will be controlled by Westminster and not Brussels.

The point is that leaders on the leave side are backing away from statements they made prior to the referendum.  And yes they can allocate funds any way they want, the problem is that those sectors who were assured that those funds would still go to them are being told that now, that might not happen.
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Offline YZT580

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #134 on: June 27, 2016, 13:28:51 »
One thing is certain.  The EU is going to play hardball right up until the final divorce papers are signed and acted upon.  They will make it as noticeably difficult as possible to discourage other would-be exiters. 

Offline Remius

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #135 on: June 27, 2016, 13:37:40 »
One thing is certain.  The EU is going to play hardball right up until the final divorce papers are signed and acted upon.  They will make it as noticeably difficult as possible to discourage other would-be exiters.

They have already stated that no discussions, formal or informal will be made until article 50 is initiated.
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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #136 on: June 27, 2016, 14:01:17 »
One thing is certain.  The EU is going to play hardball right up until the final divorce papers are signed and acted upon.  They will make it as noticeably difficult as possible to discourage other would-be exiters.
:nod:

So, out-of-left-field scenario:  is the UK government going to be craven enough to say, "well, a referendum provides us with INPUT from the public, but this'll have to be voted on" now that there's a lot of folks soiling their silks? 
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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #137 on: June 27, 2016, 14:22:54 »
Germany has already said there is no reason to be nasty.  Britain is to take its time to get a negotiating team in place.

The Germans are leaning towards a modified Norwegian solution.  The French are leaning towards a modified Swiss solution.

German industry has said they don't want to lose access to the British market for cars.

Hollande has started to be less histrionic after a talk with Merkel.

A meeting of BeNeLux plus France, Germany and Italy has pissed off the other 21 who have decided to have their own meetings. 

The French and German foreign ministers have floated the prospect of eliminating all national sovereignty. Lead balloon.

The Czech Republic has called for Juncker's resignation.

It is all to play for.

The game of Rugby has an interesting history.  A game of football was being played.  At some point a chap name of William Webb Ellis picked up the ball and ran with it.  Chaos ensued.  Two sports emerged.  Rugby and Soccer.

Some of the Brits have just picked up the ball and run with it.  We wait to see what will emerge.

And by the way - on the subject of campaign statements - there are statements and there are statements and there are interpretations of statements.

"We can move money to health care."  "We will move money to health care." "They said they would move money to health care."

Equally:

"The universe will end."  "A black hole will ensue."  "Your pensions will disappear." "Nobody will trade with us ever again."

And let us not get into the subject of domestic Canadian politicians and campaign statements.



It is permissible to point out worst case scenarios during debate.  Equally it is permissible to point out best case scenarios.  Both scenarios are equally unlikely.
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Offline Journeyman

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #138 on: June 27, 2016, 14:29:33 »
The game of Rugby has an interesting history.
Oh, and this whole scenario isn't tragic / magnificent enough (perspective dependent),  you had to bring up rugby.....after Canada's boring 20-18 defeat by Italy yesterday....   :(   *****!



(That's all I've got on Brexit;  I'm still going through John Oliver's "analyses" (in the CBC sense of the word) on YouTube until the dust settles a bit  :pop: )

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #139 on: June 27, 2016, 14:35:58 »
I'm with this 'MEPpit':

EU Debate - Oxford Union. Daniel Hannan MEP


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzNj-hH8LkY
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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #140 on: June 27, 2016, 15:23:00 »
Oh, and this whole scenario isn't tragic / magnificent enough (perspective dependent),  you had to bring up rugby.....after Canada's boring 20-18 defeat by Italy yesterday....   :(   *****!
As a descendant of a round-ball-fanatic country, I didn't want to mention it ...  >:D
... on the subject of campaign statements - there are statements and there are statements and there are interpretations of statements.

"We can move money to health care."  "We will move money to health care." "They said they would move money to health care."

Equally:

"The universe will end."  "A black hole will ensue."  "Your pensions will disappear." "Nobody will trade with us ever again."

And let us not get into the subject of domestic Canadian politicians and campaign statements.

It is permissible to point out worst case scenarios during debate.  Equally it is permissible to point out best case scenarios.  Both scenarios are equally unlikely.
:nod:
“The risk of insult is the price of clarity.” -- Roy H. Williams

The words I share here are my own, not those of anyone else or anybody I may be affiliated with.

Tony Prudori
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Offline Fishbone Jones

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #141 on: June 27, 2016, 17:45:30 »
The point is that leaders on the leave side are backing away from statements they made prior to the referendum.  And yes they can allocate funds any way they want, the problem is that those sectors who were assured that those funds would still go to them are being told that now, that might not happen.

So just like the Trudeau Liberals then.
Corruption in politics doesn't scare me.
What scares me is how comfortable people are doing nothing about it.

Offline Fishbone Jones

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #142 on: June 27, 2016, 17:55:14 »
The Brits can afford to hold off a bit on Article 50. Right now the EU wants to punish them and make it a nasty acrimonious divorce.

Meanwhile, a number of other countries are planning referendums.

By the time Article 50 is invoked by Britain, the EU just might be negotiating from a position of weakness and fighting other sovereign  states on a number of fronts.

If a few others go along with Britain, it might well be the end of the EU.

And really, who needs to be told you can only buy two bananas at a time and they have to be straight, not curved, or other such nonsense.
Corruption in politics doesn't scare me.
What scares me is how comfortable people are doing nothing about it.

jollyjacktar

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #143 on: June 27, 2016, 18:06:04 »

And really, who needs to be told you can only buy two bananas at a time and they have to be straight, not curved, or other such nonsense.

Which is why I would have voted to leave.  The meddling From Brussels would piss me off to no end.  Nevermind being pushed around by Germany or this migration issue.

Online Brad Sallows

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #144 on: June 27, 2016, 20:47:49 »
>Brexit broken promises

Given the evolution of the Lisbon Treaty, claims about misrepresentations by those opposed to EUnification need not be taken seriously.

I doubt many EU members are going to go to the wall to satisfy the desire of EUrocrats to punish Britain.  Spain, for example, needs tourist dollars.  I can't imagine why the average Spaniard would accept any fraction of hardship to satisfy fat technocrats in Brussels.

The harder Brussels squeezes, the more likely it becomes that additional EU members will slip the grasp.
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Offline Remius

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #145 on: June 27, 2016, 20:54:20 »
So just like the Trudeau Liberals then.

Yep. Minus the hair and the uhms. 
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #146 on: June 28, 2016, 11:44:29 »
>Brexit broken promises

Given the evolution of the Lisbon Treaty, claims about misrepresentations by those opposed to EUnification need not be taken seriously.

I doubt many EU members are going to go to the wall to satisfy the desire of EUrocrats to punish Britain.  Spain, for example, needs tourist dollars.  I can't imagine why the average Spaniard would accept any fraction of hardship to satisfy fat technocrats in Brussels.

The harder Brussels squeezes, the more likely it becomes that additional EU members will slip the grasp.

Plus Spain has it's own separatist issue to deal with and won't be keen on accepting an independent Scotland.

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #147 on: June 28, 2016, 11:51:49 »
Plus Spain has it's own separatist issue to deal with and won't be keen on accepting an independent Scotland.
Not to mention Belgium's tensions ...
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Offline Remius

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #148 on: June 28, 2016, 12:36:31 »
Plus Spain has it's own separatist issue to deal with and won't be keen on accepting an independent Scotland.

Maybe, but it is keen on getting some sovereignty over Gibraltar.
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Brexit Vote: 51.9% leave, 48.1% stay
« Reply #149 on: June 28, 2016, 15:30:25 »
Scotland to the rescue of English as EU official language?

Quote
Brexit prompts a push to end English in the European Union
...
With the impending British exit from the European Union, the polyglot Babel that has 24 official languages may soon strike English off the list, according to officials here, who note the change with a mixture of sadness and glee.

...if Britain pulls out, the European Union will lose the only nation that has designated English as its official language inside E.U. institutions. Each country is allowed to pick one tongue, and Ireland and Malta — the other two E.U. nations that are predominantly English-speaking — chose Gaelic and Maltese, respectively. But they are tiny compared with the juggernauts of France and Germany, which supply the other two “unofficial” working languages of the European Union...
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/06/28/brexit-prompts-a-push-to-end-english-in-the-european-union/?wpisrc=nl_wv&wpmm=1

Mark
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Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.