Author Topic: UK fatalities in Afghanistan and Iraq (summary) - BBC News  (Read 15565 times)

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Offline Yrys

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UK fatalities in Afghanistan and Iraq

Irak full list

The total number of UK troops killed in operations in Iraq has reached 179 after a soldier died
from a gunshot wound in Basra on 12 February 2009.

Comprehensive details of British fatalities since the invasion of 20 March 2003 are in the table.
The entries are arranged by date, with the most recent at the top.

MoD UK :
Operations in Iraq: British Fatalities


Afghan full list

The number of UK troops killed on operations in Afghanistan since 2001 stands at 168, after a
soldier from the 2nd Battalion the Rifles was killed in an explosion in Helmand province on 12
June.

Of all those killed, 27 died from accidents, illness, or non-combat injuries, according to the
Ministry of Defence. Details of fatalities are in the table. The entries are arranged by date,
with the most recent at the top.

MoD UK : Operations in Afghanistan: British Fatalities


View data of total death

About these figures
These figures may change as more information on individual cases comes to light, for example
following inquests or other investigations.


In pictures

Click on the photographs in the link
 to find out more information on each casualty. 


Sources

Details of UK troops killed in Iraq and Afghanistan are being recorded in tables compiled by
the BBC News website. This guide explains how the information is put together.

« Last Edit: May 07, 2017, 14:48:20 by kratz »
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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: UK fatalities in Afghanistan and Iraq (summary) - BBC News
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2009, 22:33:15 »
And in the same 'vein' (pun intentional):

"There is an overwhelming feeling: 'I have survived'. I have come back and that is reward enough. If people ask me then I tell them I got ambushed in Afghanistan. It is usually good for a pint."


Soaring casualty list forces Army to call on US medics

Scale of injuries caused by roadside bombs and mines in Afghanistan putting unbearable pressure on British surgeons

The rising toll of British casualties in Afghanistan has left Army surgeons so exhausted that they have had to ask for urgent help from an American medical team. The number of British troops injured in Afghanistan has soared – 57 were wounded in action in the first two weeks of July, the highest figure in such a period for both the Afghan and Iraq conflicts.
The number for the whole month is expected to be even higher as further casualties from Panther's Claw, the biggest operation undertaken by UK forces in the Afghan war, filter through. In comparison, there were 46 injuries in the whole of June and 24 in May. July has also been the deadliest month since the mission began, with 22 deaths.
Additional medical staff, including plastic surgeons, X-ray technicians and specialist nurses have been rushed out to Helmand to cope with the steep rise in the numbers of those blown up and shot during continuing and fierce engagements.
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And more beds might have to be provided at the rehabilitation centre at Headley Court, Surrey, for those who had suffered amputations. According to Blesma (British Limbless Ex-Servicemen Association), 73 members of the armed forces had lost limbs and the number is expected to rise to 80 when recent injuries are counted.
The pressure has been intense, according to Surgeon Rear-Admiral Lionel Jarvis, assistant chief of defence staff (Health). "As a result of the exhaustion of the surgeons and the very long hours that they are working in theatre, we talked to our coalition colleagues and an American surgical team from elsewhere came to reinforce the hospital at Camp Bastion [a British base]," he said.
"We have been watching the whole campaign – not just Panther's Claw – over the past two to three years, reacting to the number of patients in the hospital. In fact, we identified that there was a stage at which we needed more surgeons and surgical teams to react to the ongoing flow of casualties."
Colonel Peter Mahoney, who has just returned after serving as medical director for clinical care at Camp Bastion at the height of the fighting in Panther's Claw, said: "It is stressful for everybody dealing with injured young people, particularly when you are cutting off people's camouflage that you recognise as your own; that's always more emotive, it's very distressing. It's been busy, there's no doubt about it.
"There have been days when surgical teams are working constantly. We had pulses of activity depending on what's taking place on the ground."
Colonel Mahoney described the difficulties posed by the increased use of roadside bombs and mines by the Taliban which has been the biggest source of deaths and injuries among British forces. "It has been difficult, it has certainly tested our skills but our results show that our training has been appropriate. We are looking at all the latest advances in surgery to deal with this."
Other statistics released yesterday by the Ministry of Defence reflected the rising tempo of violence in what has been described as a defining time in the Afghan conflict. Already this year, 61 members of the British forces have been seriously or very seriously wounded, compared with a total of 65 for the whole of 2008.
Last month, 230 service personnel were brought back to the UK for treatment. In one week alone this month, 157 people were brought to the Camp Bastion field hospital for treatment, including British, other Nato and Afghan troops. There have now been some 2,650 casualties in Afghanistan since the start of MoD records in 2006.
And yesterday, the bodies of the latest British soldiers killed in the war were returned. Warrant Officer Class 2 Sean Upton, of 5 Regiment Royal Artillery, and Trooper Phillip Lawrence, of the Light Dragoons, died in separate explosions in Helmand on 27 July. Bombardier Craig Hopson, of 40 Regiment Royal Artillery, died on 25 July in a roadside bomb attack.
General Sir Richard Dannatt, the outgoing head of the Army, called on the whole of Government to be put on a "war-like footing" to deliver support for troops and security for Afghanistan. He said: "We should be under no illusion. We are at war and if we want to succeed, which we must, we must get on to a war-like footing.
"Afghanistan is truly war among the people, about the people and for the people. We are succeeding in spite of the tragic losses that we have suffered. Our people have much to be proud of and I have been immensely humbled by the fortitude of our serving young men and women and their families over the past few years."
'You don't hear about life-changing injuries'
Sergeant Major Andrew Stockton, 42, was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade during an ambush near Sangin in June 2006, and lost an arm. He was medically discharged from the Royal Artillery in 2007.
I must confess that when I deployed on overseas tours I always thought I might not come back. What I didn't consider was that I might come back maimed, with life-changing injuries.
I have always said that you hear, very sadly, about those who lose their lives but not about the three or four other people who have suffered life-changing injuries. I've always found that surprising. I think the public should know about the injuries that are occurring out there.
I have found it straightforward dealing with my injury. I had one incident in bed at night when I had phantom limb pains and I suddenly thought 'I've only got one arm now'. But it quickly passed. No amount of crying and griping will help the situation. Most soldiers have the same attitude. Blesma (British Limbless Ex-Service Men's Association) opens doors to a new life. At 40 years of age I learned to water-ski, qualified as an advanced open-water diver and went white-water rafting.
Last time I was told a guy had been shot in the face, I wondered how I was going to react. I have empathy but it is limited as it was so easy for me to recover. There are people who have worse injuries than me.
There is an overwhelming feeling: 'I have survived'. I have come back and that is reward enough. If people ask me then I tell them I got ambushed in Afghanistan. It is usually good for a pint.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/soaring-casualty-list-forces-army-to-call-on-us-medics-1765342.html
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline old medic

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Re: UK fatalities in Afghanistan and Iraq (summary) - BBC News
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2010, 19:23:21 »
Britain hits grim milestone before major attack in southern Afghanistan
by The Canadian Press
08 Feb 2010

KABUL, Afghanistan - Three British soldiers have died in southern Afghanistan, officials announced Monday, raising Britain's death toll in the conflict to 256 - breaking the number of Britons lost in the Falklands war of 1982.

Britain reached the grim milestone as British, American and Afghan forces are preparing for a major attack on Marjah in Helmand province, the biggest town in southern Afghanistan under Taliban control. Britain's defence secretary has warned the British public to expect more casualties when the Marjah attack occurs.

U.S. officials have said for weeks that they plan to attack Marjah, a centre of the Taliban's logistical and opium smuggling network about 380 miles (610 kilometres) southwest of Kabul. But the precise date of the attack has been kept secret.

Two soldiers from the Royal Scots Borderers were killed Sunday in an explosion near the Helmand district of Sangin, which is located north of Marjah, the Ministry of Defence said.

Another soldier working with a specialized bomb unit in Afghanistan was killed in an explosion. Lt. Col. David Wakefield said in a statement Monday the serviceman died in the Nad-e-Ali district of Afghanistan's southern Helmand province.

Britain's losses in the Falklands occurred during a 73-day war to drive Argentine forces from the South Atlantic colony they had invaded to affirm their own claim to the islands, which they call the Malvinas...........

continued at link:
http://www.brandonsun.com/story.php?story_id=184415

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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: UK fatalities in Afghanistan and Iraq (summary) - BBC News
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2012, 09:01:17 »
http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/DefenceNews/MilitaryOperations/ModConfirmsNamesOfTheSixSoldiersBelievedKilledInHelmand.htm

The soldier from 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment is named as:

• Sergeant Nigel Coupe, aged 33

The five soldiers from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment are:

• Corporal Jake Hartley, 20
• Private Anthony Frampton, 20
• Private Christopher Kershaw, 19
• Private Daniel Wade, 20
• Private Daniel Wilford, 21

Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: UK fatalities in Afghanistan and Iraq (summary) - BBC News
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2012, 17:32:37 »
Two more,sadly, killed in action, according to this report which is reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the BBC:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-19614592
Quote
Two British soldiers shot dead in Afghanistan

15 September 2012

Two British soldiers have been shot dead in Afghanistan by a man wearing a local police uniform, the MoD has said.

The troops, from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, were killed at a checkpoint in the south of Nahr-e Saraj, Helmand province, on Saturday. The men's families have been informed.

Spokesman Maj Laurence Roche said the regiment had suffered a "deep loss".

The deaths take the number of British personnel killed since operations began in Afghanistan in 2001 to 430.

Maj Roche added: "Everyone serving within Task Force Helmand will want to send our condolences to the soldiers' families and loved ones at this time."

The deaths come a day after a British soldier was killed in southern Afghanistan after his vehicle hit a roadside bomb.

The soldier, from 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, was travelling in Nahr-e Saraj. He has not yet been named by the Ministry of Defence but his family was informed.

The Ministry of Defence said the incident was not connected with an attack later that evening on Camp Bastion, the UK's main base in the Afghanistan.
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
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Offline tomahawk6

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: UK fatalities in Afghanistan and Iraq (summary) - BBC News
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2016, 01:00:15 »
SGT Davidson.RIP. From the comments made he was one hell of an NCO.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2211353/Lee-Davidson-Pregnant-widow-pays-emotional-tribute-soldier-husband-funeral-weeks-expecting-child.html?ICO=most_read_module





Beyond the loom of the last lone star, through open darkness hurled,
Further than rebel comet dared or hiving star-swarm swirled,
Sits he with those that praise our God for that they served His world.

http://www.poetryloverspage.com/poets/kipling/dedication_2.html
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon