Author Topic: general nickname?  (Read 3835 times)

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Offline americantory

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general nickname?
« on: November 12, 2016, 23:19:31 »
Hi folks, I am a supporter of the Forces, though never a member. I have been a historical soldier however, and have been involved in reenacting groups for about 15 years. This is my first post.

Anyhow, is there a general nickname that's used for a member of the Canadian Forces, similar to how a British soldier has been called a "Tommy"? I found a page that listed nicknames for some of the regiments, but I don't want to be that specific. I want something general, like Tommy. I thank you in advance for your help.

Calvin.

Offline americantory

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2016, 23:31:29 »
Doing more research, it seems "cornflake" might apply? "a tri-service cap badge affixed to a new CF member's beret in his or her early recruit stages, prior to wearing the badge of a given branch or regiment, or regimental headdress. It displays the crossed swords (Land), bird (Air), and anchor (Sea). Its shape and colour resembles a piece of corn flakes cereal, hence its name."

Does this seems legit?

Calvin.

Hi folks, I am a supporter of the Forces, though never a member. I have been a historical soldier however, and have been involved in reenacting groups for about 15 years. This is my first post.

Anyhow, is there a general nickname that's used for a member of the Canadian Forces, similar to how a British soldier has been called a "Tommy"? I found a page that listed nicknames for some of the regiments, but I don't want to be that specific. I want something general, like Tommy. I thank you in advance for your help.

Calvin.

Offline medicineman

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2016, 23:34:26 »
Bloggins

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline americantory

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2016, 23:44:10 »
Thanks. I saw that name associated with some controversy regarding gays in the Forces in the recent past. That said, it does seem to generally mean a Canadian soldier.

Bloggins

MM

Offline Tcm621

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2016, 00:14:07 »
Thanks. I saw that name associated with some controversy regarding gays in the Forces in the recent past. That said, it does seem to generally mean a Canadian soldier.
Bloggins, is the name used in any situation where you don't want to use a real name. For example, 'let's say Cpl Bloggins is drunk on duty.  What do you do?'  or on an example piece of paper work like  release memo for Sgt.  Bloggins.

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Offline medicineman

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2016, 08:11:31 »
Bloggins, is the name used in any situation where you don't want to use a real name. For example, 'let's say Cpl Bloggins is drunk on duty.  What do you do?'  or on an example piece of paper work like  release memo for Sgt.  Bloggins.

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What he said.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline sledge

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2016, 10:49:58 »
Army types in WW2 were called Herbies. After the Herbie cartoon.

Offline George Wallace

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2016, 11:06:47 »
Army types in WW2 were called Herbies. After the Herbie cartoon.

And:

Pongos;
Brown Jobs;
Two Cylinder Jobs; and
Bush Bunnies.

In modern times, "Herbies" refer to members of the Artillery; just as "Zipperheads" refer to Armour crewmen by most, most particularly to the members of the Lord Strathconna Horse (RC).  Much the same way as "Grunts" refer almost universally to Infantry......The British call them "Squaddies".

There are many terms applied to various members of the forces.  Some we can not print here.   [:D

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Offline Kat Stevens

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2016, 13:24:58 »
Canon fodder?  Political puppets? Redheaded stepchildren? Inconvenient expense?
Apparently, a "USUAL SUSPECT"

“In peace there's nothing so becomes a man as modest stillness and humility; but when the blast of war blows in our ears, then imitate the action of the tiger; stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, disguise fair nature with hard-favor'd rage.”

 Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and start slitting throats

Offline Michael O'Leary

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2016, 13:33:06 »
Hi folks, I am a supporter of the Forces, though never a member. I have been a historical soldier however, and have been involved in reenacting groups for about 15 years. This is my first post.

Anyhow, is there a general nickname that's used for a member of the Canadian Forces, similar to how a British soldier has been called a "Tommy"? I found a page that listed nicknames for some of the regiments, but I don't want to be that specific. I want something general, like Tommy. I thank you in advance for your help.

Calvin.

There isn't a generic one-size-fits-all term for the Canadian soldier that you might equate to the use of "Tommy" for the British soldier.

During the First World War, the popular use of "Tommy" in news articles and other references could also be applied to Canadians (keep in mind this would be in English publications with that linguistic viewpoint and an overwhelmingly British cultural background).

During the Second World War, you can find "Johnny Canuck" used occasionally, but not generally used in the military or widely applied.

The type of term you're looking for doesn't exist and trying to force one to fit, like "cornflake," probably won't go over well.


Offline Journeyman

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2016, 08:11:02 »
We seem to have a growing number who are "special snowflakes"    :whistle:

Offline PPCLI Guy

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2016, 14:43:21 »
I thought this was about nicknames for Generals, like "Bald Fonzie" or "Ned Flanders" or "Doogie Howitzer".

Never mind....
"The higher the rank, the more necessary it is that boldness should be accompanied by a reflective mind....for with increase in rank it becomes always a matter less of self-sacrifice and more a matter of the preservation of others, and the good of the whole."

Karl von Clausewitz

Offline George Wallace

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2016, 16:26:40 »
 [:D

Well then!  We would have to include 'Stache'

 >:D
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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #13 on: November 14, 2016, 16:33:49 »
[:D

Well then!  We would have to include 'Stache'

 >:D
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Offline sledge

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2016, 20:20:41 »
Mind you sailors have been known as hairy bags for decades now.

Offline Pusser

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Re: general nickname?
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2016, 12:20:41 »
"Bloggins" and "Tommy" seem to have their origins in British service publications.

"Bloggins" was used as a name on sample forms illustrated in Royal Navy publications.  Initially, the RCN simply adopted RN publications, but as they were re-written or re-branded for Canadian use, the name Bloggins was brought across.

The British Army's "sample soldier" was "Thomas Atkins."  The term was also made popular by Kipling in his poem, called, "Tommy:"

I went into a public-'ouse to get a pint o' beer,
The publican 'e up an' sez, "We serve no red-coats here."
The girls be'ind the bar they laughed an' giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an' to myself sez I:
O it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, go away";
But it's "Thank you, Mister Atkins", when the band begins to play,
The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,
O it's "Thank you, Mister Atkins", when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,
They gave a drunk civilian room, but 'adn't none for me;
They sent me to the gallery or round the music-'alls,
But when it comes to fightin', Lord! they'll shove me in the stalls!
For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, wait outside";
But it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide,
The troopship's on the tide, my boys, the troopship's on the tide,
O it's "Special train for Atkins" when the trooper's on the tide.

Yes, makin' mock o' uniforms that guard you while you sleep
Is cheaper than them uniforms, an' they're starvation cheap;
An' hustlin' drunken soldiers when they're goin' large a bit
Is five times better business than paradin' in full kit.
Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, 'ow's yer soul?"
But it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll,
The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
O it's "Thin red line of 'eroes" when the drums begin to roll.

We aren't no thin red 'eroes, nor we aren't no blackguards too,
But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;
An' if sometimes our conduck isn't all your fancy paints,
Why, single men in barricks don't grow into plaster saints;
While it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Tommy, fall be'ind",
But it's "Please to walk in front, sir", when there's trouble in the wind,
There's trouble in the wind, my boys, there's trouble in the wind,
O it's "Please to walk in front, sir", when there's trouble in the wind.

You talk o' better food for us, an' schools, an' fires, an' all:
We'll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.
Don't mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face
The Widow's Uniform is not the soldier-man's disgrace
For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Chuck him out, the brute!"
But it's "Saviour of 'is country" when the guns begin to shoot;
An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please;
An' Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool -- you bet that Tommy sees!
Sure, apes read Nietzsche.  They just don't understand it.