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Offline milnews.ca

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #100 on: June 21, 2017, 09:54:05 »
Looks like CSE'll be officially in the game as well - this via The Canadian Press:
Quote
Canada is going all-in when it comes to cyberwarfare.

Weeks after giving the military permission to start developing cyberweapons and other offensive capabilities, the Trudeau government wants to issue a similar directive to Canada's electronic spy agency.

New national security legislation unveiled by the Liberals on Tuesday would, among other things, let the Communications Security Establishment launch cyberattacks against foreign targets.

Those would include potential threats ranging from hackers and terrorists to countries and governments.

The 70-year-old agency's existing mandate includes protecting computer systems that are deemed critical by the federal government, and only allows for the collection of information from foreign targets.

Those responsibilities would continue under the proposed legislation.

The changes being introduced by the government are necessary to protect Canada in the 21st century, said Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan, who is responsible for overseeing the agency.

"Currently we only have a defensive shield," Sajjan told a news conference. "We have to wait to be hit."

The spy agency is also being tapped to help the Canadian military when it comes to developing the latter's ability to fight online, which was included as part of the Liberal government's recently released defence policy.

Taken together, the new measures for CSE and the military mark Canada's late entrance into a realm of warfare already occupied by its Five Eyes intelligence allies and potential foes such as Russia and China — and whose importance is only growing.

CSE, for example, warned last week that cyberthreats to democratic processes around the world are on the rise, and that Canada will face the risk of cyberattacks during the next federal election in 2019.

(...)

the proposed law forbids CSE from hurting or killing anyone through its online actions, or making any intentional effort "to obstruct, pervert or defeat the course of justice or democracy."

One key question is the degree to which Canadians will be notified about what sort of cybermeasures the spy agency and military are engaged in, including attacks on extremist groups and other countries.

Sajjan acknowledged that actual details of any attack will likely be extremely scarce for the public.

"Just like any other type of operation, it goes through a very strict process and obviously for national security reasons, we can't outline a lot of the work that is being done," he said.

"I think Canadians do understand that." ...
More details on how CSE's mandate will be adjusted via the Info-machine here.

If you want to track Bill C-59 thru the legislative sausage machine, click here.
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Online Blackadder1916

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #101 on: June 21, 2017, 12:34:24 »
Looks like CSE'll be officially in the game as well

Well, at least they didn't give this bill, "National Security Act, 2017", some fancy, public relations title as a demonstration of their concern.  That always cheeses me off.

Quote
the proposed law forbids CSE from . . . "making any intentional effort "to obstruct, pervert or defeat the course of justice or democracy."

While this can be taken as a motherhood statement, the bill does not define "course of justice" or "democracy".  When complaints come in, whose definition is used?  Ours (i.e. Canada's)?  Or a foreign enemy's usual practice of justice and democracy?
« Last Edit: June 21, 2017, 13:15:41 by Blackadder1916 »
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Online Blackadder1916

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #102 on: June 21, 2017, 13:34:54 »
In making a quick perusal of Bill C-59, National Security Act 2017 and looking at the proposed amendments to the National Defence Act which will occur due to "The Communications Security Establishment Act" (which is part of this legislation) I noticed an oddity (well, odd at least to me).

The bill proposes two amendments to the NDA in the part that deals with the CSE.

http://www.parl.ca/DocumentViewer/en/42-1/bill/C-59/first-reading#enH4100
Quote
National Defence Act

83 (1) Paragraph 273.‍64(1)‍(c) of the National Defence Act is replaced by the following:

(c) to provide technical and operational assistance to federal law enforcement and security agencies, the Canadian Forces and the Department of National Defence.

(2) Subsection 273.‍64(3) of the Act is replaced by the following:

Limitations imposed by law

(3) Activities carried out under paragraph (1)‍(c) are subject to any limitations imposed by law on federal law enforcement and security agencies, the Canadian Forces and the Department of National Defence.

And then, immediately following, the bill proposes to repeal that part of the NDA in its entirety.

Quote
Consequential Amendments
 
National Defence Act

84 Part V.‍1 of the National Defence Act is repealed
.
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Offline PuckChaser

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #103 on: June 21, 2017, 18:09:56 »
Why modify an act if they're going to repeal the specific portion?

This is the current Act paras if anyone is interested:

Quote
Mandate

    273.64 (1) The mandate of the Communications Security Establishment is

        (a) to acquire and use information from the global information infrastructure for the purpose of providing foreign intelligence, in accordance with Government of Canada intelligence priorities;

        (b) to provide advice, guidance and services to help ensure the protection of electronic information and of information infrastructures of importance to the Government of Canada; and

        (c) to provide technical and operational assistance to federal law enforcement and security agencies in the performance of their lawful duties.
    Marginal note:Protection of Canadians

    (2) Activities carried out under paragraphs (1)(a) and (b)

        (a) shall not be directed at Canadians or any person in Canada; and

        (b) shall be subject to measures to protect the privacy of Canadians in the use and retention of intercepted information.
    Marginal note:Limitations imposed by law

    (3) Activities carried out under paragraph (1)(c) are subject to any limitations imposed by law on federal law enforcement and security agencies in the performance of their duties.

Offline MCG

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Re: "Canadian military to relax deployment-readiness rule" ...
« Reply #104 on: June 26, 2017, 12:25:59 »
I noticed the "Canadian military to relax deployment-readiness rule ..."  thread got merged into the cyber operator thread.  That is unfortunate because, while the cyber operator was the preferred whipping boy of the topic, the idea of expanding the catchment population for recruiting will be something that applies to many if not most or all occupations.  The topic is back in the news today, and apparently "In order to be successful in the future, we need to be able to recruit from the entire population."  That statement sounds (to me) uncomfortably like saying we need to remove universality of service as a barrier to hiring.  I'm sure that is not the message that was intended.

Quote
Military broadens horizons
Canada's armed forces widens search for potential soldiers
Lee Berthiaume
Kingston Whig-Standard
26 Jun 2017


Canada's military is going all out to erase its reputation for intolerance and misogyny, aiming to recast itself instead as welcoming to Canadians of all races, religions and sexual orientations.

The effort - driven by several factors, including a need to bolster its dwindling numbers - includes a comprehensive effort to connect with and recruit women, new citizens and even members of the LGBT community.

The Trudeau government's plan to invest an extra $62 billion in the military over the next 20 years includes hiring 3,500 more fulltime personnel and 1,500 parttime reservists, numbers that would bring the ranks of the Forces to their highest level since the end of the Cold War.

First, though, comes a significant and persistent challenge: getting more Canadians to join.

The Forces have struggled for years to hit recruiting numbers, resulting in thousands of unfilled positions such as pilots and technicians.

That's why fixing the recruiting system is a top priority, said Lt.-Gen. Charles Lamarre, the chief of military personnel, whose role is to oversee all aspects of human resources in the Canadian Armed Forces.

Central to that goal is making the military more inclusive, diverse and attractive to all Canadians, regardless of their backgrounds.

"Our population doesn't look like all white guys," Lamarre said in an interview with the Canadian Press.

"If you want to get the very best people - the very smartest, most capable, most committed and most ingenious - then you need to look broadly and not exclude groups that would be very useful to you."

There is more to the push towards increased diversity and inclusiveness than simply recruiting, though that part of the equation is vitally important. Gen. Jonathan Vance, Canada's chief of the defence staff, recently released a diversity strategy in which he noted that Canada was becoming more diverse - and the military needed to follow suit.

Doing so would be necessary to attract and retain people, Vance wrote, as well as to ensure the military continued to reflect the society it is sworn to protect, and to increase its effectiveness on missions abroad.

That's why the Forces appear to be turning a page: Leaders are recognizing the real importance of diversity, said Alan Okros, an expert on diversity in the military at the Canadian Forces College in Toronto.

"This idea that people with different views, different experiences, different skill sets are going to make the military stronger has been kind of coalescing and coming together for about a year and a half," Okros said.

"This isn't a luxury, this isn't social engineering, this isn't political manoeuvring or political correctness. This is now an operational requirement."

Vance has since taken the unprecedented step of ordering the military to grow the percentage of female personnel to 25 per cent in the next decade, up from 15 per cent.

Recruiters are now launching targeted advertising campaigns and reaching out to women who previously expressed an interest in a military career but didn't join.

Senior commanders, meanwhile, are reviewing everything from uniforms and ceremonies to food and religious accommodations to see whether they meet the requirements of a more diverse force.

Lamarre plans to speak Monday at a citizenship ceremony in Ottawa in hopes of explaining to new Canadians what he describes as "a tangible way in which they can serve their nation."

And he hopes to sit down with Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde and other indigenous leaders to talk about ways to reach out and attract people from those communities.

Others within the military are getting in on the action too, with the head of the navy, Vice-Admiral Ron Lloyd, issuing a directive last week encouraging his sailors to attend Pride parades in uniform.

Vance is expected to issue a similar directive to the rest of the military in the coming days.

Not everyone agrees with what the military is doing, Lloyd acknowledged, including some of those who are already in uniform. But changing the face of the Forces isn't just some feel-good exercise, he said.

"In order to be successful in the future, we need to be able to recruit from the entire population."

There are other challenges to overcome besides convincing some current personnel of the importance of diversity.

The military is still trying to overcome years of bad headlines about the treatment of women and members of the LGBT community by adopting a zero-tolerance approach to sexual misconduct.

There has also been a historic lack of interest in the Forces by many ethnic communities, particularly those that trace their origins to countries where the military has a bad reputation.

And then there are the problems identified by auditor general Michael Ferguson last year, namely that the recruiting system is struggling with red tape and the effects of Conservative budget cuts.

"We're definitely still at the planning stage," Lamarre acknowledged. "We're in the process of actually saying: 'What is it we must do?'"
 

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #105 on: June 26, 2017, 12:59:36 »
Quote
Senior commanders, meanwhile, are reviewing everything from uniforms and ceremonies to food and religious accommodations to see whether they meet the requirements of a more diverse force.


Two years ago I was on a change of command parade. A soldier from another unit was telling me how he was on summer leave with family out in New Brunswick. He got a call from his chain of command that they didn't have enough members for the parade and he was ordered to cancel his leave get on a plane and fly back to base, which he did.  He showed up for parade practice and surprise, his unit now had too many people, so he was cut and ordered to watch the parade from the stands.

All the diversity and accommodations won't make people stay in, once trained, if we keep treating people like crap. They're just going to do their 3 years and quit.
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Offline Spectrum

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #106 on: June 26, 2017, 14:54:21 »
Unfortunately the retention of white males (the bulk of CAF members) doesn't score political points nor does it fit with the current social narrative.

Offline Pre-flight

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #107 on: June 26, 2017, 15:25:59 »

Two years ago I was on a change of command parade. A soldier from another unit was telling me how he was on summer leave with family out in New Brunswick. He got a call from his chain of command that they didn't have enough members for the parade and he was ordered to cancel his leave get on a plane and fly back to base, which he did.  He showed up for parade practice and surprise, his unit now had too many people, so he was cut and ordered to watch the parade from the stands.

All the diversity and accommodations won't make people stay in, once trained, if we keep treating people like crap. They're just going to do their 3 years and quit.

What an effective use of taxpayer money, paying for flight changes and leave cancellation costs, all for a parade.

Offline Pre-flight

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #108 on: June 26, 2017, 15:28:22 »
Unfortunately the retention of white males (the bulk of CAF members) doesn't score political points nor does it fit with the current social narrative.

Forces needs new people more than they need to retain the older ones.

CAF now is disgustingly top heavy. When you have more MCpls and Sgts than you have Ptes, or more Capts and Majors than you have Lts and 2Lts then it's an issue.

And given the current demographics of Canada, if we want to meet recruiting goals, we need to make inroads in the communities that historically have been joining up in low relative numbers.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #109 on: June 26, 2017, 15:50:47 »
Good piece by Bill Robinson at his Lux Ex Umbra blog on CSE and offensive cyber ops (role with CAF noted):

Quote
CSE to get foreign cyber operations mandate
https://luxexumbra.blogspot.ca/2017/06/cse-to-get-foreign-cyber-operations.html

Mark
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Offline Spectrum

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #110 on: June 26, 2017, 15:57:59 »
Forces needs new people more than they need to retain the older ones.

CAF now is disgustingly top heavy. When you have more MCpls and Sgts than you have Ptes, or more Capts and Majors than you have Lts and 2Lts then it's an issue.

And given the current demographics of Canada, if we want to meet recruiting goals, we need to make inroads in the communities that historically have been joining up in low relative numbers.

Unfortunately when it's your experienced MCpls and Cpls pulling pin, what do you expect? Who's going to train and supervise that Pte? Yes we are way too top heavy, but that's a failure in the establishment. Bringing in waves of new people without solving the underlying problems will solve nothing.

Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #111 on: June 26, 2017, 16:47:42 »

Two years ago I was on a change of command parade. A soldier from another unit was telling me how he was on summer leave with family out in New Brunswick. He got a call from his chain of command that they didn't have enough members for the parade and he was ordered to cancel his leave get on a plane and fly back to base, which he did.  He showed up for parade practice and surprise, his unit now had too many people, so he was cut and ordered to watch the parade from the stands.

All the diversity and accommodations won't make people stay in, once trained, if we keep treating people like crap. They're just going to do their 3 years and quit.

http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/caf-community-benefits/leave-policy.page#chap1

1.1.11 Imperative military requirements

Imperative military requirements mean a situation or circumstance that precludes a CF member from taking leave or permits a CO to recall a member from leave.

IMR include, but are not limited to:
•participating in an operational deployment or major military exercise;
•participating in an unforecasted tasking;
•attending a career course;
•attending a court martial; or
•posting or attached posting (including any action related to it, such as HHT, out-clearances, travelling time, Special Leave (Relocation))

IMR do not include:
•recalling a member from sick leave to take annual leave;
•recalling a member from LWOP to take annual leave;
•recalling a member from leave for an annual medical/dental exam; or
recalling a member for performing routine personal administrative issues such as, but not limited to, PER interviews, testing or parades.

2 things the CAF is great at:

1.  developing and publishing policy; and

2.  ignoring policy. 

 :nod:
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Offline Pre-flight

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #112 on: June 27, 2017, 09:06:18 »
Unfortunately when it's your experienced MCpls and Cpls pulling pin, what do you expect? Who's going to train and supervise that Pte? Yes we are way too top heavy, but that's a failure in the establishment. Bringing in waves of new people without solving the underlying problems will solve nothing.


There will still be plenty of MCpls/Sgts to train them. When's the last time you been in a unit that had too many Ptes and not enough supervisors?

Offline Journeyman

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #113 on: June 27, 2017, 09:52:16 »
China has signed an agreement saying it will stop conducting state-sponsored cyberattacks aimed at stealing Canadian private-sector trade secrets and proprietary technology.

I guess JTF-Geek will pre-emptively have their budget/ORBAT cut, now that China is no longer a threat.   :nod:

Offline Brihard

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #114 on: June 27, 2017, 11:39:14 »

There will still be plenty of MCpls/Sgts to train them. When's the last time you been in a unit that had too many Ptes and not enough supervisors?

Actually that's a pretty chronic issue in the PRes. My platoon this past year was a Capt, 2x Sgt (one acting Pl WO, and me as a Sect Comd), 1x MCpl as Sect Comd (and pregnant), and a full complement of Pte/Cpl. The PRes, especially in cities, is chronically short of NCOs due to the significant attrition we tend to see in the year or two after guys graduate university/college and get busy with adult life.
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Offline Pre-flight

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #115 on: June 27, 2017, 15:00:14 »
Actually that's a pretty chronic issue in the PRes. My platoon this past year was a Capt, 2x Sgt (one acting Pl WO, and me as a Sect Comd), 1x MCpl as Sect Comd (and pregnant), and a full complement of Pte/Cpl. The PRes, especially in cities, is chronically short of NCOs due to the significant attrition we tend to see in the year or two after guys graduate university/college and get busy with adult life.

Honestly that's a problem PRes is always going to have. For about 80% of recruits are only there as a part-time/summer job while they're going to school, so you get them for 4-5 years max, hence they release before getting to MCpl/Sgt, otherwise you'll have something of a crisis of leadership as your JNCOs/SNCMs effectively disappear as things like fulltime jobs obviously become a bigger priority in their lives. Best strategy for PRes is to take in more retiring Reg F or ideally those that release early as these people are likely to be able to devote more time and have more practical experience to offer.

That said, the Reg F needs to prioritize their org structure and focus on recruiting new recruits rather than what they are doing, which seems to be trying to retain broken Officers and NCOs by relaxing fitness and deployability standards.

Offline George Wallace

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #116 on: June 27, 2017, 16:48:51 »
Honestly that's a problem PRes is always going to have. For about 80% of recruits are only there as a part-time/summer job while they're going to school, so you get them for 4-5 years max, hence they release before getting to MCpl/Sgt, otherwise you'll have something of a crisis of leadership as your JNCOs/SNCMs effectively disappear as things like fulltime jobs obviously become a bigger priority in their lives. Best strategy for PRes is to take in more retiring Reg F or ideally those that release early as these people are likely to be able to devote more time and have more practical experience to offer.

That said, the Reg F needs to prioritize their org structure and focus on recruiting new recruits rather than what they are doing, which seems to be trying to retain broken Officers and NCOs by relaxing fitness and deployability standards.

You may find that those stats are different in units not in large metropolitan areas and/or near universities.

I think the Government and Army made a very big mistake in the '70s when they folded up/disbanded a large number of Reserve units in rural areas. 
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Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #117 on: June 27, 2017, 17:09:00 »
Quote from: RADOPSIGOPACISSOP
Best strategy for PRes is to take in more retiring Reg F or ideally those that release early as these people are likely to be able to devote more time and have more practical experience to offer.

I'm not so sure this is a 100% solution brother.  Reg F has some drastic (at times) different ways of doing things and I'd say 50% of the time I've seen Reg F members get burnt out or so frustrated with the reserve system that they stop caring.  They're two fairly different worlds IMO.  On the other hand the contacts and resources that reg F members bring to the reserve world is priceless

Quote
That said, the Reg F needs to prioritize their org structure and focus on recruiting new recruits rather than what they are doing, which seems to be trying to retain broken Officers and NCOs by relaxing fitness and deploy-ability standards.
I think what would really benefit the regs is to get soldiers moving up through the NCO ranks faster. It's not uncommon for someone to sit at the rank of cpl for years, get PLQ then stay a cpl for years after that, mopping concrete floors and taking out garbage and crap. We have a very experienced  NCO core (and the envy of some allies I think) but we're also old. We could use with getting soldiers promoted sooner and moving through the ranks somewhat faster. We're too clique orientated and need to replace our promotion system with some kind of testing format like the US has.

As for being broken yea there is a lot of that but personally I find fresh soldiers coming from battles school are the most broken and injured. Soon as they get to battalion it's on to a med chit, t-cat and physio. I've often commented physio should be on their clear-in sheets.
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Offline Pre-flight

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #118 on: June 28, 2017, 09:17:19 »
I'm not so sure this is a 100% solution brother.  Reg F has some drastic (at times) different ways of doing things and I'd say 50% of the time I've seen Reg F members get burnt out or so frustrated with the reserve system that they stop caring.  They're two fairly different worlds IMO.  On the other hand the contacts and resources that reg F members bring to the reserve world is priceless
I think what would really benefit the regs is to get soldiers moving up through the NCO ranks faster. It's not uncommon for someone to sit at the rank of cpl for years, get PLQ then stay a cpl for years after that, mopping concrete floors and taking out garbage and crap. We have a very experienced  NCO core (and the envy of some allies I think) but we're also old. We could use with getting soldiers promoted sooner and moving through the ranks somewhat faster. We're too clique orientated and need to replace our promotion system with some kind of testing format like the US has.

As for being broken yea there is a lot of that but personally I find fresh soldiers coming from battles school are the most broken and injured. Soon as they get to battalion it's on to a med chit, t-cat and physio. I've often commented physio should be on their clear-in sheets.

Bit of a off topic but I do agree. Part of our issue is we promote too slow, but we also canonize ranks as supervisors too quickly. In most allied military I've worked with right up to Sgt is a working rank, in which case they're sort of leading in a participatory method. In the CAF it seems the Sgt level has a more hands off and seperate style that kind of establishes everything from Sgt and above to be more supervisory/management ranks and less the side by side leadership you see of Sgts elsewhere.

We do definitely need more young blood at all rank levels. I wouldn't want to see the 4 and 5 year Sgts like in he US but I have been seeing more 23 y/o MCpls and 26 y/o Sgts and by and large it's not a bad thing.

Offline Pre-flight

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #119 on: June 28, 2017, 09:20:03 »
You may find that those stats are different in units not in large metropolitan areas and/or near universities.

I think the Government and Army made a very big mistake in the '70s when they folded up/disbanded a large number of Reserve units in rural areas.

Honestly I don't put much thought into the reserves. I spent years in the P Res and am not very convinced on value for money. I get that the reserves mean a lot to you but to others they don't matter much.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #120 on: July 12, 2017, 12:57:45 »
The IDF goes a different route, their Cyber-Commandos are actually real commandos. No armchair warriors there:

https://strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/20170712.aspx

Quote
Information Warfare: Israel Plays Rough

July 12, 2017: The Israeli domestic intelligence service (Shin Bet, similar to the British MI5) recently confirmed what was already widely known among hackers; trying to hack Israeli networks will often trigger instant counter-hacks that will at least halt the hackers with unexpected error messages or, worse, generate a powerful counter-hack directed against the attackers system. The worst result is that, as several thousand foreign hackers have already discovered, the Israelis will identify who you are and where you are operating from. If the hacker is in a nation that has extradition or similar arrangements with Israel the hacker can start worrying about getting arrested or, at the very least, being placed under investigation and added to a list of the usual suspects.

Shin Bet could not hide the fact that it was expanding its Cyber War operations and recruiting additional personnel. So announcements like this are considered part PR and part recruiting. Since 2010 various Israeli government and military organizations have been seeking additional staff for new Cyber War efforts that can detect and thwart enemy hackers. This included seeking expert hackers willing to train to operate in the field with Israeli commando units. That new Cyber War unit was actually part of military intelligence and sought recruits from those already in the military as well as civilians.

Israel had long had troops dedicated to Cyber War activities, but in 2010 they introduced a new twist to this. Israel used the same screening and recruiting techniques they had developed for commando units to find suitable recruits for an elite Cyber War unit. Thus the Israelis were not just seeking men (or women) with the right technical skills, but also with the mental toughness characteristic of the regular commandos. The new Cyber War unit handled the most difficult and dangerous Cyber War situations. An example would be a Cyber War attack using an unknown and seemingly devastating new technique. For that you needed a Cyber War commando unit available to send against the problem. Same with an enemy Cyber War target that has to be disrupted, or simply investigated. You needed a unit to do the job because this unit had already been recruited and trained to be the best of the best. Similarly, if you were sending in regular commandos on a raid, to steal technology (something Israel has already done several times), several of the Cyber War commandos would go along. Already known to be tough minded, but possessing high technical skills, the Cyber War guys could keep up with the regular commandos, and quickly sort out the enemy technology, and take, or destroy, the right items.

But in the meantime Israeli Cyber War organizations had been ordered to be more aggressive in dealing with hackers and hacking attempts. There was a certain urgency to this because Islamic terrorists were developing better hacking skills, often because many recruits came from Western countries where young Moslem men have more access to computers and college level training in computer science and security. Groups like ISIL (Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant) and al Qaeda found that they could use many of these Western recruits who had skills, but were not willing to carry out suicide attacks or engage in armed combat. Apparently many of these Islamic cyber terrorists were first detected and identified when they tried to hack Israeli systems. Israel now has Cyber War intelligence sharing arrangements (official or unofficial) with most Western nations containing Moslem minorities.

By going public about some of this counter-hacker activity Shin Bet may also cause some of the less disciplined Islamic cyber terrorists to get angry enough to make an attack and get caught. Whatever works.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #121 on: July 12, 2017, 22:28:29 »
This is a very long and detailed blog post. It technically debunks the claim of Russian hacking (essentially the author proves the "DNS logs" given to the media were fabricated). This is important in two respects, in that this is the sort of thing a CF Cyber unit may have to do in order to protect the integrity of the GoC, and if you can follow this, it shows the true level of detail that Cyber warriors will need to master in order to actually carry out their task. I'll just leave the link:

https://weaponizedautism.wordpress.com/2017/04/09/trump-dns-logs-fabricated/
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline mrswoodca

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Re: "Canadian military to relax deployment-readiness rule" ...
« Reply #122 on: July 13, 2017, 14:58:47 »
Since this cyber chat isn't going over to the Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread, I'll continue the derail.

Ok, we're talking about the CAF. No one really knows where we're going with this (except apparently one poster who is amazingly prescient, or hooked up to the Matrix).  One thing we do  know, is how the Force's tribal elders deal with retention issues, whether SOF or this Sheldon Cooper Command.....


...uniforms & badges.

I predict that we'll see Cyber Commando uniforms combining the 'best' elements of Starship Troopers and Transformers and whatever else the little geek darlings are into these days.... such that they'll be the envy of COMICONs everywhere.

     :nod:

Worst Case, they could got the whole Borg route and try adopting a "You are about to be assimilated, Resistance is Futile" type of approach...

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Cyber Operator trade Mega Thread
« Reply #123 on: August 05, 2017, 11:20:37 »
Very good detailed analysis by Bill Robinson at his essential Lux Ex Umbra blog--note definitions, cyber work with CAF (should MND still be the minister?), covert human
help abroad, exploitation of social media:

Quote
CSE and Bill C-59 overview

My first two posts on the contents of Bill C-59 covered the proposal to give CSE a new foreign cyber operations mandate [ https://luxexumbra.blogspot.ca/2017/06/cse-to-get-foreign-cyber-operations.html ] and the proposal to replace CSE's current watchdog [ https://luxexumbra.blogspot.ca/2017/07/bill-c-59-new-dogs-for-new-tricks.html ], the CSE Commissioner, with two new institutions, the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) and the Intelligence Commissioner. These are the most important changes proposed for CSE, but the bill also contains a number of other important measures that deserve comment. I'll try to cover the key remaining points in this post...

Establishment established


...
https://luxexumbra.blogspot.ca/2017/08/cse-and-bill-c-59-overview.html

Well worth the read.

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.