Author Topic: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers  (Read 50355 times)

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Offline RomeoJuliet

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #250 on: July 16, 2018, 10:43:59 »
You mean my comment on Satan's cocaine?  Newfoundland had a big snowstorm in June.  That's what I was referring to.
Okay thanks Remius. Had no clue what that was, now I know.


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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #251 on: July 16, 2018, 10:50:51 »
Okay thanks Remius. Had no clue what that was, now I know.


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Yeah, no worries, it wasn't exactly clear... but the weird weather there turns me off.  I love visiting though!
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Offline Brihard

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #252 on: July 16, 2018, 11:10:10 »
On this whole rather ludicrous 'ship 'em all to Newfoundland' idea... Where precisely do you think the federal government has the legal authority to compel people to be moved from one place to another? What law or mechanism would you envision being used to compel them to do that? Are CBSA inland enforcement or the RCMP going to show up, bundle them into vans, and send them off? Because from my standpoint I can tell you that law enforcement have no power to do that.

Section 6 of the Charter - mobility rights - is not the only part in play here. There would be a section 15 charter challenge faster than you could blink, and it would win. There's no way the government could legally do this.

More to the point, how, precisely, do you think these individuals - many of them just at the early stages of struggling to learn English comprehensible to anyone else, never mind that spoken on the Rock - are going to integrate into the local economy? Newfoundland needs skilled trades workers. It needs technicians, people with trade tickets... es, some seasonal jobs could be filled for sure, but ghettoizing our asylum seeker population in Newfoundland fish processing plants is not going to solve any problems. Are you prepared to see a vast sum spent to get them trade tickets? Qualify them to work in healthcare and energy? I suspect not.

Labour is a commodity, yes, but human beings are human beings. Canada must and will continue to treat them as such.
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Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #253 on: July 16, 2018, 11:41:03 »
On this whole rather ludicrous 'ship 'em all to Newfoundland' idea... Where precisely do you think the federal government has the legal authority to compel people to be moved from one place to another? What law or mechanism would you envision being used to compel them to do that? Are CBSA inland enforcement or the RCMP going to show up, bundle them into vans, and send them off? Because from my standpoint I can tell you that law enforcement have no power to do that.

Section 6 of the Charter - mobility rights - is not the only part in play here. There would be a section 15 charter challenge faster than you could blink, and it would win. There's no way the government could legally do this.

More to the point, how, precisely, do you think these individuals - many of them just at the early stages of struggling to learn English comprehensible to anyone else, never mind that spoken on the Rock - are going to integrate into the local economy? Newfoundland needs skilled trades workers. It needs technicians, people with trade tickets... es, some seasonal jobs could be filled for sure, but ghettoizing our asylum seeker population in Newfoundland fish processing plants is not going to solve any problems. Are you prepared to see a vast sum spent to get them trade tickets? Qualify them to work in healthcare and energy? I suspect not.

Labour is a commodity, yes, but human beings are human beings. Canada must and will continue to treat them as such.
How would it fail a charter challenge? It isn't discrimination on the basis of anything. Those who enter illegally would be located in Newfoundland. Unless you believe that living in Newfoundland would be in "violation of essential human dignity"

Lets face it, as asylum seekers, they are not granted mobility rights right away.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/can-immigrants-be-told-where-they-must-live-in-canada/article31519796/

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If it is determined that such a limitation is indeed a violation of mobility rights, then it would have to pass what is known as the Oakes test.

The federal government would have to show there is a pressing and substantial objective in settling some immigrants in small towns and rural areas. Mr. McCallum's statements so far suggest he is taking an economic perspective that emphasizes business concerns about labour shortages in remote areas. Courts would likely consider this a justifiable purpose.

Similarly, the actual restrictions imposed on these newcomers would have to limit their mobility rights as little as is reasonably possible. Courts would have to be convinced that the benefits of the measure outweigh the seriousness of the infringement.

The fact that the limitation would be temporary (for the duration of the immigrant visa, for example) would help the government's case. And by structuring the immigrant-selection criteria in a way that grants more points for applicants willing to work in small towns or rural areas, it could also be presented as one option among many available to potential immigrants, who could otherwise apply under the regular economic stream. In other words, the limitation accepted voluntarily by some immigrants would be balanced by the fact that their choice would give them a better chance of obtaining permanent resident status.

Along with clarifying the constitutional question around mobility rights, the policy could play an important role in reinforcing the notion that immigration is not only about the personal well-being and advancement of foreign applicants, but also about the needs of the receiving country.

I think the impending bankruptcy of a province would qualify.

As for getting a bunch of refugees trained in the trades, I would be behind that 100 percent. Go to NFLD and get 3 years of schooling covered, done and done.
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Online Remius

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #254 on: July 16, 2018, 11:43:44 »

Go to NFLD and get 3 years of schooling covered, done and done.

Sound like our METTP program that we can never seem to fill...
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Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #255 on: July 16, 2018, 11:46:43 »
Sound like our METTP program that we can never seem to fill...
Yes, but in this case, people don't have the right to say no, in a sense.
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Offline Larry Strong

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Offline Brihard

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #257 on: July 16, 2018, 12:21:35 »
How would it fail a charter challenge? It isn't discrimination on the basis of anything. Those who enter illegally would be located in Newfoundland. Unless you believe that living in Newfoundland would be in "violation of essential human dignity"

Lets face it, as asylum seekers, they are not granted mobility rights right away.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/can-immigrants-be-told-where-they-must-live-in-canada/article31519796/

I think the impending bankruptcy of a province would qualify.

As for getting a bunch of refugees trained in the trades, I would be behind that 100 percent. Go to NFLD and get 3 years of schooling covered, done and done.

OK, let's put it this way because it's evident you're struggling to take my meaning on this:

Imagine a Nigerian family crosses the border at Roxham Road, Quebec. An adult couple, their 19 year old son, 16 year old daughter, and 11 year old son. They are immediately arrested by RCMP, and are handed off to CBSA. All of that happens due to the established powers under federal legislation including the Customs Act, the Immigration and Refugee PRotection Act, and the Criminal Code. Police and peace officers (e.g., CBSA) get their powers because the law specifically empowers them to do something. Section 11 of the Customs Act makes it an offense to enter Canada without reporting to a customs office. Section 12 makes it illegal to import goods (including literally the contents of your pockets and personal luggage) without reporting. Section 126 of the criminal Code makes it a criminal offense to disobey a federal statute (e.g., breaking the Customs Act). Section 495 of the Criminal Code allows a police officer to arrest without a warrant someone who has committed an offense. Section 25 of the Criminal Code lets a police officer use reasonable force to execute that arrest.

So with all of these legal authorities and powers, this family is arrested by RCMP, handed off to CBSA, and are detained while they are processed. They are all run through criminal databases, and CBSA determine that they can be released with an IRB hearing date. This is what is happening in the vast majority of cases.

What you are proposing is that some power be arbitrarily exercised to then tell that family "You will relocate to Goose Bay, Labrador, in order to help ameliorate labour shortages there". Thing is there is no legislative or regulatory foundation for that. Nothing in Canadian law allows CBSA or Citizenship and Immigration Canada to compel a refugee claimant arriving in Canada in this manner to go to and live in a specific province. They are either detained in custody, or they are out on their own with a hearing date. Nothing in law, therefore, would allow police to round them up and ship them to Newfoundland. A police officer laying hands on a refugee claimant in order to do that would be guilty of assault. Nothing in law would allow for a legally defensible course of action of basically blackmailing them with "if you don't move to Newfoundland, we'll arrest you and hold you in jail". It wouldn't work, the law doesn't allow it.

You asked about S.15 equality of rights- "15. (1) Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability." A law such as you propose would definitely be discriminatory based on national origin. It would be far too great an infringement of the Charter to be saved by S.1.

And, in any case, imagining for a second that everything you suggest wasn't completely illegal, you still haven't made out how it would actually work. If provinces want to attract immigrant populations to remedy their labour shortages, they can do that through all the mechanisms that already exist for provincial governments to tweak their economies and attract labour. Press-ganging refugees is not one of those mechanisms.
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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #258 on: July 16, 2018, 17:09:50 »
Yes, but in this case, people don't have the right to say no, in a sense.

We could set up some sort of encampment for them to live at. They could work out of that encampment, for the good of the nation, and then maybe attend classes in the evening to ensure a proper education in our political system.

Comrade Stalin, is that you?

Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #259 on: July 16, 2018, 17:18:58 »
We could set up some sort of encampment for them to live at. They could work out of that encampment, for the good of the nation, and then maybe attend classes in the evening to ensure a proper education in our political system.

Comrade Stalin, is that you?
Meh. Okay.

NFLD and Lab can continue to watch its young people migrate away, with no way to encourage immigrants to move there.

They can continue on the road to bankruptcy.

I like the way people say this wouldn't work, while not even to attempt mentioning a solution of their own.

Meh.
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Offline Chief Engineer

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #260 on: July 16, 2018, 17:25:19 »
Meh. Okay.

NFLD and Lab can continue to watch its young people migrate away, with no way to encourage immigrants to move there.

They can continue on the road to bankruptcy.

I like the way people say this wouldn't work, while not even to attempt mentioning a solution of their own.

Meh.

People in Quebec are in for a treat when you enter politics that's for sure. Newfoundland will be fine without your style of forced immigration.
"When your draught exceeds your depth, you are most assuredly aground"

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Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #261 on: July 16, 2018, 17:35:17 »
People in Quebec are in for a treat when you enter politics that's for sure. Newfoundland will be fine without your style of forced immigration.
https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/the-rock-on-the-rocks-newfoundland-labrador-bankruptcy

Quote
A January poll by Abacus Data found that 53 per cent of Newfoundland and Labrador residents expect the province to go bankrupt sometime in the next few years, the most likely outcome a federal bailout.
Just fine.
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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #262 on: July 16, 2018, 18:22:12 »
https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/the-rock-on-the-rocks-newfoundland-labrador-bankruptcy
 Just fine.

Polls is not the same as being bankrupt and sending in immigrants to burden the system is not going to help things.
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Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #263 on: July 16, 2018, 18:29:40 »
Polls is not the same as being bankrupt and sending in immigrants to burden the system is not going to help things.
Burden the system?

Isn't this the province hurting for immigrants, but can't attract them?
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Offline Loachman

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #264 on: July 16, 2018, 18:41:33 »
NFLD and Lab have a aging population and trouble attracting people to live there.

Win win.

Current residents may not see it that way.

Importing large numbers from foreign cultures is seldom looked upon favourably by the host communities.

People want their replacements to be like them, not completely oblivious to our laws and culture.

They will generally welcome small numbers that can be supported and eventually assimilated, but they do not want to be overwhelmed as is happening in the UK, Europe, and Sweden.

There will eventually be a backlash.

Isn't that a pickle. NFLD and Lab need more immigrants, yet cannot afford to pay for more immigrants, because it has a aging population which can really only be rectified by more immigrants.

The right kind of immigrants would be welcome. The wrong kind - unskilled, unable to communicate, and law-breakers from the start - would be a drain on an already fragile province, and could quickly overwhelm it.

Who benefits from that?

If they want to come in, there is a process that thousands of people manage to follow every year, without entering the US on visitors' visas and immediately heading north to illegal advertised border crossing sites.

The patient and law-abiding immigrants certainly don't appreciate thousands of people illegally cutting in front of them and delaying their legal entry.

while not even to attempt mentioning a solution of their own.

Like our current federal government?

Here's the first step:

Before attempting to correct a plumbing problem, shut off the %@#$*&! main water supply.

Has that happened yet?

Or is the basement continuing to flood?

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #265 on: July 16, 2018, 18:51:37 »
Newfoundland had a job vacancy rate of 1.6% in 2017, which is the lowest in the country. That means that you're going to dump a whole whack of immigrants on them, and they won't have jobs. Newfoundland doesn't have a people problem, they have a jobs problem. It is the opposite of Alberta, where there were tons of jobs and no one to do them.

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/daily-quotidien/180111/dq180111a-eng.pdf?st=PXNuxphF

Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #266 on: July 16, 2018, 18:54:49 »
Current residents may not see it that way.

Importing large numbers from foreign cultures is seldom looked upon favourably by the host communities.

People want their replacements to be like them, not completely oblivious to our laws and culture.

They will generally welcome small numbers that can be supported and eventually assimilated, but they do not want to be overwhelmed as is happening in the UK, Europe, and Sweden.

There will eventually be a backlash.

Beggars can't be choosers, but I guess in this case, they can.
Quote

The right kind of immigrants would be welcome. The wrong kind - unskilled, unable to communicate, and law-breakers from the start - would be a drain on an already fragile province, and could quickly overwhelm it.

Who benefits from that?

If they want to come in, there is a process that thousands of people manage to follow every year, without entering the US on visitors' visas and immediately heading north to illegal advertised border crossing sites.
Ya, maybe. But when life gives you lemons...if these people can be successfully integrated, isn't that a win?
Quote

The patient and law-abiding immigrants certainly don't appreciate thousands of people illegally cutting in front of them and delaying their legal entry.

Like our current federal government?
Exactly. The feds are dropping the ball on this file, and they need a plan on how to deal with it. Even a bad plan is better than no plan, which is the case now
Quote

Here's the first step:

Before attempting to correct a plumbing problem, shut off the %@#$*&! main water supply.

Has that happened yet?

Or is the basement continuing to flood?
How would you shut off the main water supply? Build a fence?
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Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #267 on: July 16, 2018, 18:59:48 »
Newfoundland had a job vacancy rate of 1.6% in 2017, which is the lowest in the country. That means that you're going to dump a whole whack of immigrants on them, and they won't have jobs. Newfoundland doesn't have a people problem, they have a jobs problem. It is the opposite of Alberta, where there were tons of jobs and no one to do them.

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/daily-quotidien/180111/dq180111a-eng.pdf?st=PXNuxphF
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/aging-population-leads-to-financial-trouble-1.4345078


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/population-decline-newfoundland-labrador-harris-centre-report-1.4279580

Quote
According to the numbers, the province's population will drop by about eight per cent. That's just over 41,000 people.

The average age will bump up from 43 to 48, compared to the average Canadian who is now 41.

Some places, like River of Ponds and Roddickton on the Northern Peninsula, will see their population plummet by 40 per cent. The average resident there will be 54 years old.

Many other towns will shrink by 30 per cent, the report predicts: Musgrave Harbour, the Lewisporte and Twillingate region, the Gander Bay and Fogo Island area, and the south coast.

Quote
The problem, says Askari, is the province's changing demographics.

"I think the main problem in Newfoundland [and Labrador] really is the aging of the population and the loss of population," he said. "Which is really a structural issue for the province."

"It's a major challenge for the government and I know it's extremely difficult to deal with that."

It's a problem not even oil revenues can solve, he said.

"If the oil prices come back, maybe some help will come from that and that will raise the revenues," he said. "But I don't think that's going to really solve all the problems."

In particular, it won't help the extra spending on health care that goes along with an aging population. The report estimates that the province will have to bump its health-care expenses by almost seven per cent of its current GDP — the largest increase in the country.

"The loss of population will lead to lower economic growth and then the increase in spending as a result of the aging of the population, those two will lead to a continuous and rising fiscal deficit and, as a result, rising public debt in Newfoundland," he said.

If you say so.
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Offline Larry Strong

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #268 on: July 16, 2018, 19:07:07 »
Meh. Okay.

NFLD and Lab can continue to watch its young people migrate away,

Why do you think all the young people in Newfoundland are leaving?????????

Ya think because there is no work????

So what are all these immigrants going to do for work in NFLD????

Talk about simplistic.....


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Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #269 on: July 16, 2018, 19:09:05 »
Why do you think all the young people in Newfoundland are leaving?????????

Ya think because there is no work????

So what are all these immigrants going to do for work in NFLD????

Talk about simplistic.....


Cheers
Larry


Cheers
Larry
Okay, fine. What was your solution again?
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Offline Larry Strong

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #270 on: July 16, 2018, 19:14:13 »
Uphold the law.....and NO it's not being done....


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Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #271 on: July 16, 2018, 19:17:25 »
Uphold the law.....and NO it's not being done....


Cheers
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How do you want that done?
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Offline Loachman

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #272 on: July 16, 2018, 19:54:42 »
Beggars can't be choosers, but I guess in this case, they can.

Importing people who will be nothing more than an expensive burden on a fragile province for a long period does not leave people much choice.

Dumping masses of unemployable into areas with no employment is a recipe for disaster.

Turning large sections of towns into ghettoes of non-English-speaking, welfare-dependent people ignorant of Canadian laws and customs, thereby driving more locals out of their towns and possibly province is not a viable solution.

This is happening elsewhere in the world.

if these people can be successfully integrated, isn't that a win?

Can they be? How long will it take? How much will it cost? At what point do taxpayers say "enough"? At what point does our immigration system become overwhelmed? When does the backlash start? When do you move to the real world?

I was a volunteer with a privately-funded Burundian family support group several years ago. I have seen similar a similar group work with my Syrian neighbours.

It takes far more effort, by far more people, over far longer than you are aware. There are only so many people willing and able to do that, and nowhere nearly enough, and they tend to need longish breaks before picking up another family, if they are willing to do so at all. Interpreters can be a huge challenge to find, and they may have, um, quirky agendae of their own. The Burundian family included ten children. Nobody spoke any English. Nobody had any real education, and no skills, with most of the children having been born in a refugee camp (which was rife with violence; the father was severely injured in one of two attacks), and really seemed to be under-equipped to adapt to their new lives. They ended up leaving for Montreal a year later, where there is a Burundian community. I have no idea how they are doing now.

The Syrian family has one more child than that. Several of their supporters had lived in Syria many years ago, had a good understanding of the culture, and spoke Arabic, and they continue to visit frequently. A second Syrian family moved in close a year later, and there are some Libyans and Egyptians nearby, so they have a fairly happy community but have not ghettoized themselves as has happened elsewhere, and can happen all too easily.

The two older boys have general construction labourer jobs, and the father is a farm hand. How many construction companies, or farms, are looking for unskilled workers in a province with a shrinking population?

How would you shut off the main water supply? Build a fence?

That's a good start. Much better than turning RCMP into RCBH.

Immediately flying illegal border crossers back to their home countries with directions about how to make legal applications would be another. We already expect would-be immigrants to apply for admission from their countries and will not accept applications from those here on holidays or student visas etcetera. Word would get around at least as quickly as Trudeau's "everybody welcome" tweet did. There are millions of actual, known refugees who have, in many cases, been languishing for years in camps, some of whom we could take instead of illegal queue-jumpers. We can't accept all, but we can pick and choose. Building camps where they could be held while awaiting adjudication on their refugee claims, rather than releasing them into the wild, would be another good thing to do.

Asking that nice President Trump to have his people better assess visa applicants from certain countries, and crack down on traffickers south of illegal border crossing points, would be a good thing to do, but that's a little late, now. Renegotiating the Safe Third Country Agreement to remove the not-crossing-into-Canada-at-an-official-port-of-entry loophole, in exchange, perhaps, for dropping/modifying supply management would be a big discouragement as well.

If only a certain prime minister had not pissed him off....

Offline Altair

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #273 on: July 16, 2018, 20:08:49 »
Importing people who will be nothing more than an expensive burden on a fragile province for a long period does not leave people much choice.

Dumping masses of unemployable into areas with no employment is a recipe for disaster.

Turning large sections of towns into ghettoes of non-English-speaking, welfare-dependent people ignorant of Canadian laws and customs, thereby driving more locals out of their towns and possibly province is not a viable solution.

This is happening elsewhere in the world.
Canada has been rather decent at integrating new immigrants into Canada.
Quote

Can they be? How long will it take? How much will it cost? At what point do taxpayers say "enough"? At what point does our immigration system become overwhelmed? When does the backlash start? When do you move to the real world?

I was a volunteer with a privately-funded Burundian family support group several years ago. I have seen similar a similar group work with my Syrian neighbours.

It takes far more effort, by far more people, over far longer than you are aware. There are only so many people willing and able to do that, and nowhere nearly enough, and they tend to need longish breaks before picking up another family, if they are willing to do so at all. Interpreters can be a huge challenge to find, and they may have, um, quirky agendae of their own. The Burundian family included ten children. Nobody spoke any English. Nobody had any real education, and no skills, with most of the children having been born in a refugee camp (which was rife with violence; the father was severely injured in one of two attacks), and really seemed to be under-equipped to adapt to their new lives. They ended up leaving for Montreal a year later, where there is a Burundian community. I have no idea how they are doing now.

The Syrian family has one more child than that. Several of their supporters had lived in Syria many years ago, had a good understanding of the culture, and spoke Arabic, and they continue to visit frequently. A second Syrian family moved in close a year later, and there are some Libyans and Egyptians nearby, so they have a fairly happy community but have not ghettoized themselves as has happened elsewhere, and can happen all too easily.

The two older boys have general construction labourer jobs, and the father is a farm hand. How many construction companies, or farms, are looking for unskilled workers in a province with a shrinking population?
Population booms sometimes come with a GDP boost, and more economic activity. Less people, and it's the exact opposite. NFLD and Lab is stuck in a demographic time bomb right now, with less young working age people, more older, retired people, who need more health care than younger people. Rising health care costs and shrinking working age population is a demographic crisis, an economic crisis, and very soon, a government crisis. What would you suggest? You may not like my idea, but I don't hear you proposing any solutions
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That's a good start. Much better than turning RCMP into RCBH.

Immediately flying illegal border crossers back to their home countries with directions about how to make legal applications would be another.
If they make an asylum claim, we have to hear their case
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We already expect would-be immigrants to apply for admission from their countries and will not accept applications from those here on holidays or student visas etcetera.
Sure, but these people are making asylum claims once they arrive, which usually means we need to hear their case before we can simply kick them out
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Word would get around at least as quickly as Trudeau's "everybody welcome" tweet did.
It was a dumb tweet, but here we are.
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There are millions of actual, known refugees who have, in many cases, been languishing for years in camps, some of whom we could take instead of illegal queue-jumpers. We can't accept all, but we can pick and choose. Building camps where they could be held while awaiting adjudication on their refugee claims, rather than releasing them into the wild, would be another good thing to do.
Can the camp be in NFLD?
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Asking that nice President Trump to have his people better assess visa applicants from certain countries, and crack down on traffickers south of illegal border crossing points, would be a good thing to do, but that's a little late, now. Renegotiating the Safe Third Country Agreement to remove the not-crossing-into-Canada-at-an-official-port-of-entry loophole, in exchange, perhaps, for dropping/modifying supply management would be a big discouragement as well.

If only a certain prime minister had not pissed him off....
The only leader the president seems to get along with is Putin, I wont blame Trudeau for that.

Also, I think it's wishful thinking that the USA would want to stop immigrants from leaving. The situation on the Canadian border is probably a blessing for the current administration. So the Safe 3rd country act isn't going anywhere, so we need a canadian solution. America isn't going to help us.
Someday I'll care about milpoints.

Offline Loachman

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Re: Illegal Border Crossing into Canada - Asylum Seekers
« Reply #274 on: July 16, 2018, 20:31:29 »
Canada has been rather decent at integrating new immigrants into Canada.

In controlled numbers, according to an established process.

America isn't going to help us.

Of course not, given the prime minister that has been inflicted upon us.

And who still refuses to take any corrective measures.