Author Topic: Lessons Learned by a LAV Captain - Defense  (Read 21340 times)

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Offline Infanteer

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Re: Lessons Learned by a LAV Captain - Defense
« Reply #50 on: January 20, 2019, 21:36:01 »
All of that sounds about right to me.  I'd argue that at the lowest echelons of combat (company, battalion) you're probably going want to position elements in depth to mask them somehow from enemy direct fires.  If I'm a Bn CO, I'll pop a company in front in a series of strongpoints, and have the other companies in depth.  By being in depth, they can afford to wait before unmasking their fires as the enemy starts hitting the forward elements, helping to "absorb the momentum of the enemy's attack."
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr

Offline Colin P

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Re: Lessons Learned by a LAV Captain - Defense
« Reply #51 on: August 08, 2019, 19:36:36 »
The need will likely come far faster than we can rearm the ships. The one thing Canada does very well is to fail at correctly predicting the military needs and likely conflicts. Hell even the Brits with their experience and resources failed to prepare for the Falklands, Had the Arges waited a bit long the RN would have had even less resources.

Offline Dimsum

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Re: Lessons Learned by a LAV Captain - Defense
« Reply #52 on: August 08, 2019, 20:20:32 »
The one thing Canada every country does very well is to fail at correctly predicting the military needs and likely conflicts.

At the risk of misremembering history, the French knew for a fact that Germany was going to invade again and there are only so many ways to do it by land - hence the Maginot Line. 

We all know how that turned out.
Philip II of Macedon to Spartans (346 BC):  "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city."

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Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Lessons Learned by a LAV Captain - Defense
« Reply #53 on: August 09, 2019, 18:59:16 »
At the risk of misremembering history, the French knew for a fact that Germany was going to invade again and there are only so many ways to do it by land - hence the Maginot Line. 

We all know how that turned out.

Unfortunately, the French didn't think that may be the Germans might do hook through Netherlands/Belgium to outflank the Maginot Line.
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Lessons Learned by a LAV Captain - Defense
« Reply #54 on: August 09, 2019, 20:10:39 »
Retired AF Guy: In fact the French thought the Maginot Line would force the Germans to do the northern hook (as in WW I with Schlieffen Plan, though not including the Netherlands in the end).  And in 1939 the German General Staff's plan did involve doing just that; the French--and British--had anticipated that and the BEF and the best of French army were stationed in NE France, prepared to march into Belgium as soon as the Germans attacked (which they did in May 1940).

The Germans actually planned to execute the northern attack. Orders to execute it were repeatedly cancelled by Hitler in November and December and into January 1940, mainly because of bad weather. Then a light plane carrying a German officer with the plans crashed in Belgian territory and the Germans had to assume the allies had the plan.

So Hitler went back to the drawing board (he never really liked the initial planning) and adopted the Manstein Plan (Sichelschnitt) for the main Panzer attack to be switched to the Ardennes Forest in Luxembourg and the south of Belgium with the aim of outflanking and cutting off the French and British troops in northeast France, who were expected to move into Belgium thus increasing their vulnerability to being cut off.

All worked out a treat for the Germans. And the 1939 plan might well have been stopped or at least not led to any great war-winning breakthrough. Excuse the potted hiistory.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/fall_france_01.shtml

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« Last Edit: August 09, 2019, 20:20:43 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Infanteer

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Re: Lessons Learned by a LAV Captain - Defense
« Reply #55 on: August 09, 2019, 20:55:38 »
Moving forward to the Dyle River line is what doomed the French, not the Maginot Line.
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Lessons Learned by a LAV Captain - Defense
« Reply #56 on: August 09, 2019, 21:03:37 »
Moving forward to the Dyle River line is what doomed the French, not the Maginot Line.

A couple of decades of a continuous succession weak and ineffective national governments beforehand didn't help much either...

...but that's probably not really within a LAV Captain's arcs.

"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon